Coronavirus

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  • #108156 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    There is a lot of knowledge amongst us, I exclude myself.

    The COVID 19 is dominating the news:

    How worried should we be?

    Will this be Spanish flu proportions or just another contained outbreak as SARS and MERS were?

    Oh – and when will we start to see ‘Just in time’ manufacturing suffer?

Viewing 25 replies - 601 through 625 (of 658 total)
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  • #125920 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Just a minute. Are you saying the earth is round?

    #126284 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126351 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Daily Telegraph:

    ‘The analysis looked at data for 36,061 people who had a test between the end of April and the end of June.’

    ‘More than eight in ten people who test positive for coronavirus show none of the main symptoms at the time they are tested, a major study has shown.
    Scientists at University College London (UCL) have found that 86 per cent did not have a cough, temperature of loss of taste or smell, while some 77 per cent of people showed no symptoms at all.’

    #126357 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    So the whole test and trace system is pointless and we should just let the virus run as according to the NHS to get a test you have to be suffering from symptoms:

    a high temperature
    a new, continuous cough
    lost your sense of smell or taste or it’s changed

    It does not say what % of the 36,061 in the study tested positive, perhaps it was only 10 people and perhaps they fall into the false positive category, perhaps…..

    Quizas, Quizas, Quizas.

    #126451 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126452 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126453 Reply
    rox
    Participant

    Data shows the average age of death from coronavirus is 82.4 years

    The average age of people who died from Covid-19 in England and Wales since the pandemic began is 82.4, the Daily Mail can reveal.

    That figure – computed from Office of National Statistics data by experts at Oxford University – is significantly higher than the average age reached by people recorded as dying from all other causes, which is 81.5.

    The study by Oxford’s Centre for Evidence Based Medicine also suggests that fewer than six people per thousand who get coronavirus now are likely to die from it.

    The death rate – known as the infection fatality ratio, or IFR – has plummeted since June, even allowing for a big increase in testing.

    The figures also show that currently 40 per cent of those who die from Covid are over 85, and a further 33 per cent are between 75 and 84.

    A quarter were suffering from advanced dementia. Barely 1 per cent of those who die are under 44.

    The new figures appear to provide support for the ‘Great Barrington Declaration’, which has now been signed by nearly 15,000 leading scientists and doctors.

    The declaration, named after the Massachusetts town where it was drawn up last weekend, urges governments to switch from blanket, lockdown-style measures to ‘focused protection’ for the most vulnerable.

    It criticises lockdown policies and represents a splintering of the scientific consensus over the coronavirus response.

    As of last night it had been signed by 4,800 doctors and 9,050 medical and public health scientists.

    According to the declaration, younger people who are most unlikely to die ‘should immediately be allowed to resume life as normal’.

    It argues that this would build herd immunity, which in turn would protect the elderly and sick – who would be in isolation – because there would be lower infection rates in the community.

    Source/ The daily mail?

    #126455 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Yup.  There is also evidence of groups of students being isolated in their accomodation because of positive tests who have no symptoms and are perfectly well.

    #126457 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    It’s great news that less people are dying from Covid.

    I’ll share two personal experiences:

    1. My sister, a fit, open water swimmer, contracted Covid in April, she had some breathing issues and a cough at the time and it laid her pretty low. Now – all this time later, sometimes she struggles to climb a flight of stairs without stopping. She now has an inhaler and has been for an x-ray on her lungs to see the permanent damage caused.  The worst thing for her is that a cup of tea, a gin and tonic and many drinks taste metallic, some foods have no or a peculiar taste.

    2. A friends mother contracted covid in her care home and was on deaths door, the family pleaded to be allowed say goodbye and be with her at her time of passing, they reluctantly agreed to let my friends sister be with her. He lost his mother that day and two weeks later his sister at 64.

    I heard an excellent interview with a top chap from SAGE who said that the herd immunity gang should be classed in the same camp as anitvaxers, in that they were a disruptive and dangerous minority. More importantly antivaxers are not allowed to be interviewed or reported on in the press. The media are scrambling for stories and this group fits the narrative perfectly.

    #126464 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Sorry to hear your story wmcforum. Long Covid is definitely a thing but how much of a thing is of course unknown.  My daughter had covid quite badly and recovered completely.  Mrs W had mild symptoms which we believe was the virus and has been suffering from fatigue ever since.

    I’ve been offered the flu vaccine for many years but haven’t bothered despite catching flu badly enough to put me in bed for two weeks two winters ago.  I’ve decided to have it this year.  I’m not going to risk being laid low by flu and the possible complication of the coronavirus on top.

    #126466 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126468 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    Where are pubs? Are they in the 38% of uni students?

    #126469 Reply
    Philjb
    Participant

    Two people at my daughters office tested positive in the last two days.
    Both are students and both in halls in two different universities in London.
    she’s had no symptoms so far but she was here on Tuesday morning.
    Now we’ve also got to wait and hope we don’t have symptoms.

     

    Her department has had to close for 14 days and her boses are now saying staff won’t be paid while they are isolating.

    #126507 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126513 Reply
    ajn
    Participant

    Virus info

    #126546 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126550 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126677 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    #126687 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    This is long but we’ll worth watching through to the end.

    #126746 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    And again, if you have the time:

    #126888 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    So is it, or isn’t it?

    #127068 Reply
    rufinojoe
    Participant

    The second worst thing about corona is that people are losing jobs due to lockdowns.  I haven’t lost my job yet but I think it’s a matter of time.

    #127076 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Bitcoin or gold. Hard to think of any national currency which the coming world recession won’t hit.  I know someone who is selling his shares portfolio and mortgaging his house to buy gold.  He’s a financial adviser…

    If I had any shares and wasn’t already mortgaged I would be following his advice.

    #127082 Reply
    rox
    Participant

    It’s a tuff one to explain wigwam it depends how long you got and how deep you wanna go..

    Gold was at it’s highest recently and had a fallback and then there’s also silver, poor mans gold and other pm’s. There has been supply issues of physical metals and there’s more than just one reason for that imo.

    The main issue though is paper contracts and the dollar plunge protection team.. flooding the market and keeping the price low, although people are paying inflated prices to get hold of the physical metals. why because if you don’t hold it you don’t own it and those paper contract / derivatives etc will not be met, When the time comes. like with the fractional banking system, Everyone cannot get there share / stake back as there is not enough phyisical stored in the vaults. So you’ll just get paid back in fiat (paper) and at that time the fiat will be worth less and less overtime as more $$$ £££ is created it’s all has less buying power and pm’s are a hedge against inflation.

    So i can see why he is, the smart ones get out early and i do see a crash coming, some sort of reset, is covid part of that. i think so.. something to blame it all on.. so they can offer the next monetary system, Which i think will be cashless and that’s bad for all of us. This is were we going, where everything we do is recorded, and every transaction we make is logged and everything is just virtual and has no tangable wealth and costs nothing to create, but we need to exchange our time for it to live.

    If they deem you have a different view to the narrative, They’ll put sanctions on you, Then how do you buy food for example.. You’ll soon step into line.. like the 10k fines or threats of fines now they for a reason.. to scare owners into doing what they say at the point of entry.

    Plus we all slaves to the debt. which they cannot wait for you to slipup on, so they can take it all from you. Even councils take peoples house because they fight them in court say and when you lose their huge barrister costs etc must be met and who owns the courts. All they care about is who pays them and backing up the system, it’s all not as it seems. The only safe place is where they never tell you to put it.. but where those in the know do..

    #127118 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Look at the grey line…

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