Octopus Electric Juice ‘roaming’ service adds Ionity network access

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #141576 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Octopus Energy’s Electric Juice service gives access to multiple electric-car charging networks, with all payments appearing on a single bill

    Energy provider Octopus Energy has announced that Ionity is the latest charging provider to join its charging ‘roaming’ service Electric Juice, which gives access to well over 1,000 charging points around the UK. The service offers electric-car drivers a single way to pay for all their charging, whether off-street, on-street or at public charging points.

    Octopus partners with multiple charging networks so drivers are able to use their Octopus account to pay for a charging session at any of them, with the costs appearing on a single bill. Electric Juice is available to both existing Octopus Energy customers and all other electric-car drivers.

    The service’s launch partner was Char.gy, which offers charging points integrated in lamp-posts so those without off-street parking can charge at or near their homes.

    In October 2020, it was confirmed that the Franklin Energy LiFe, Hubsta, Alfa Power and Plug-N-Go networks would join the service, which also encompasses charging points on the Osprey (formerly Engenie) network. In March 2021, the manufacturer-backed Ionity network of ultra-rapid chargers was added to the list.

    Electric Juice grew out of Octopus’ existing work with UK charging-point operators, many of whom it supplies electricity, analytics and time-of-use tariffs to. Commenting on the launch, Octopus founder and CEO Greg Jackson said: “Electric vehicle drivers have rightly long complained that public charge points can be a real hassle, and it’s hard to keep track of costs, as every network runs on a unique app or card basis.

    “Octopus’ Electric Juice Network doesn’t just consolidate charging costs, it adds them to your Octopus Energy bill if you’re an existing customer. For non-Octopus customers, you can still use the service to ensure you’re able to track (and pay) in one simple way.”

     

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

Viewing 17 replies - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • Author
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  • #141577 Reply
    Kevin

    share.octopus.energy/dusk-cub-513

    The above will give you £50.00 credit if you join them

    #141612 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Be careful with Octopus Electric Juice, it’s a great idea but you still pay the same amount for the charge as you would using contactless (credit or debit card) with Ionity, that’s 69p kWh, if you have a car from one of the manufacturers involved with Ionity it will be much cheaper using the card you get from that manufacturer, & if you don’t then you can still use a ChargePoint card I think it is to get it at 58p kWh.

    So yes, an Electric Juice card is a useful car to have (I don’t have one yet despite being with Octopus Energy), but all it saves is the hassle of having ever more cards, & the nasty deposit charges that most of the companies issuing cards charge.

     

    #141637 Reply
    Kevin

    Octopus tariff octopus go  4 hours off peak 12.30-4.30 am 5p kwh to charge car its on their website

    #141649 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Ionity for their fast chargers charge 69kWh with Electric juice 5% discount that approximately 65/66p for a kWh.

    So a 160 mile journey if a EV achieves 4 miles/kWh @ 0.69/kWh = £27.60

    So a petrol car doing the same journey achieving 35mpg @£.15 litre = approximately £23.86

    A diesel car doing the same journey achieving 40mpg @£1.22 litre = approximately £22.20

    Someone is making a real financially killing you car understand why the public are so sceptical, I am  100% all for EV cars but come on.

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Oscarmax.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #141710 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ionity is a group of fossil manufacturers who have to release EVs to meet pollution credit goals & it is part funded by the EU, so of course it’s a corrupt papering over cracks & fleecing consumer scheme.

    Tesla superchargers cost about 24 p per kWh as a benchmark.

    PodPoint rapids 23 p per kWh

    BP Pulse ultra rapids (150kW) 42 p per kWh, 27 p per kWh for members

    Many other providers charge in the 30-40 p per kWh range

    Last summer when the Ionity chargers at Cobham services were free vending, you’d see a constant stream of EV owners turning up to try them, but now they’re almost always deserted & the cheaper charging opportunities in the area are taken instead, but an occasional Audi eTron or VW ID3 does turn up & use their discount card (We Charge Go – £5.99 per month (introductory 1st year free on ID3) and 45 p per kWh. We Charge Plus – £13.99 per month (introductory 1st year £7.99 per month on ID3) and 25 p per kWh).

    (As a comparison to these figures, BP Pulse membership is £7.85 per month, then AC chargers 12 p per kWh (supermarket BP pulse posts are free), 50kW DC chargers 15 p per kWh, and ultra rapid DC chargers 27 p per kWh, BUT, anyone can get a BP Pulse membership card).

     

     

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    #141713 Reply
    Kevin

    So better charging at home it would seem electric not worth the hassle unless you are always near home then city car electric ok with this tariff plus get 50.00 credit a good deal

    Octopus tariff octopus go  4 hours off peak 12.30-4.30 am 5p kwh to charge car its on their website

    Put into your account during signing up with them this code and a 50.00 credit will be added after your switch.

    share.octopus.energy/dusk-cub-513

     

    #141714 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Ionity is a group of fossil manufacturers who have to release EVs to meet pollution credit goals & it is part funded by the EU, so of course it’s a corrupt papering over cracks & fleecing consumer scheme. Tesla superchargers cost about 24 p per kWh as a benchmark. PodPoint rapids 23 p per kWh BP Pulse ultra rapids (150kW) 42 p per kWh, 27 p per kWh for members Many other providers charge in the 30-40 p per kWh range Last summer when the Ionity chargers at Cobham services were free vending, you’d see a constant stream of EV owners turning up to try them, but now they’re almost always deserted & the cheaper charging opportunities in the area are taken instead, but an occasional Audi eTron or VW ID3 does turn up & use their discount card (We Charge Go – £5.99 per month (introductory 1st year free on ID3) and 45 p per kWh. We Charge Plus – £13.99 per month (introductory 1st year £7.99 per month on ID3) and 25 p per kWh). (As a comparison to these figures, BP Pulse membership is £7.85 per month, then AC chargers 12 p per kWh (supermarket BP pulse posts are free), 50kW DC chargers 15 p per kWh, and ultra rapid DC chargers 27 p per kWh, BUT, anyone can get a BP Pulse membership card).

    I was waiting for that super brain of your to gives us some real life costs, we need real users like yourself to guide us all through the EV changes.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #141715 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    So better charging at home it would seem electric not worth the hassle unless you are always near home then city car electric ok

    Well, not quite, if your journeys are mainly near home for say 90% of the year then you save a vast amount charging at home, so it offsets when you go on a summer holiday in the EV & you use those Ionity chargers at 69 p per kWh on the outward & inbound legs of your holiday. As you’d only book holiday accomodation that has an EV charging point, that won’t cost you much more than charging at home anyway (you would, wouldn’t you? when I look for a hotel or other accomodation I only look at the ones with EV charging, the other ones can go bust).

     

    p.s. Both Brydo & myself already use Octopus Energy as our provider & we also have the refer codes, no need to spam them on every post & the thread is Brydo’s.

     

    #141716 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    So better charging at home it would seem electric not worth the hassle unless you are always near home then city car electric ok with this tariff plus get 50.00 credit a good deal Octopus tariff octopus go 4 hours off peak 12.30-4.30 am 5p kwh to charge car its on their website Put into your account during signing up with them this code and a 50.00 credit will be added after your switch. share.octopus.energy/dusk-cub-513

    Too late Kevin I have been with Octopus for the last 2 years.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #141719 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I was waiting for that super brain of your to gives us some real life costs, we need real users like yourself to guide us all through the EV changes.

    Ah, now, I’ve been a little economical with the truth with the charging figures, as often the Ionity chargers will limit to 37 or 43kW rather than the higher power figures quoted, & whilst sat at a BP Pulse ultra rapid 150kW charger yesterday it was trickling around 50kW maximum (measured by my latest PSA monitoring toy with the USB dongle plugged through a cunning adapter cable – yes I really am a nerd) and was decidedly unstable, the chap on the next charger gave up charging his Jaguar iPace when his charger failed after reconnecting several times & the screen showed it as being broken after.

    Some chargers are decidedly flaky, the ones here, Ionity & BP Pulse ultra rapids were all made by ABB, & they’re supposed to be pretty reliable, perhaps it’s the way they have been set up, or, more likely, their connection & load on the grid is being limited. Some of the BP Pulse installations do pull constantly on the grid & store energy in batteries to supply at higher rates when an EV demands it, Ionity too, maybe we are draining these chargers more quickly than they can charge their battery banks.

    Tesla superchargers also use battery storage & limit charge speeds as seen in some of Bjorn Nyland’s videos so it’s all across the industry.

    There are all sorts of snippets that you pick up about EVs when you follow them a lot, such as the Renault Zoe being a choosy little beastie with chargers, if it detects even the slightest residual to earth it won’t charge, wheras other cars will tolerate this upto where the RCD on your distribution board (a.k.a. fusebox in your house) trips, which is around 6mA if memory serves.

     

    #141724 Reply
    Kevin

    Sorry did not see it like that,don’t wish to upset, can see a lot of issues before ev cars can be used for long journeys,watched an article the other day, came of an A road to charge,one charging point only,car just pulled in before them,took 45 mins. to charge,then they charged their car 3/4 hour stop altogether added to journey  not good,all for ev,when better services ,but not for about 3 years so petrol it is when due this time around.

    #141725 Reply
    Kevin

    Sorry 90 mins in total long long time so you need think carefully how far you travel before you go electric,for now anyway

    #141726 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Long time EV drivers don’t stop at a charger & completely charge to 100% because of the way that batteries work.

    The fastest charging is at the lower states of charge, so 10-80% charge will very likely take less time than 80-100%, my own EV charges upto 27% at 100kW, then upto 52% at 72kW, then upto 72% at 54kW, then upto 84% at 27kW, then it gets really slow, seeing 13kW, then 7kW & the last 2% at 3kW. You’d unplug from the DC rapid & plug into a 7kW AC post to achieve 100% where the car is trying to balance the battery.

    So, for me, I’ll try to stop at 10-15% SoC & charge until I reach 72%, then I’ll set off to my next charger/destination, I’m not going to sit around on a rapid or ultra rapid charger blocking others from charging for the rest of their journey, that would be incredibly rude & selfish & is why rapid chargers have overstay penalties. As my car will do 10% to 80% in 30 minutes on the right ultra rapid charger then that’s the range I work in. Hopefully the next generations of these EVs will charge much faster, we are already seeing that in Tesla/Porsche/Hyundai.

    I tend also to charge to 100% on my home charger the night before a long journey so I set off with the maximum range. It’s also worth knowing that it’s best not to leave these batteries at 100% SoC for too long (a few hours after reaching the 100% before a journey is fine, a few days will degrade the battery).

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    #141728 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Now I have been charging our PHEV battery up to what I am assuming is 100%, the PHEV battery 13.8kWh, the battery has a 30% self protection  a full charge takes 9.6/9.9kWh weather temperature dependant


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #141742 Reply
    John

    I have just ordered my new car, a PHEV, I have noticed when we go to our local Aldi supermarket where there are two charging bays next to the disabled parking bays, that there often cars parked in the two bays that are not charging them, they look for the most of the time that these cars are ordinary diesel or petrol cars. The problem is these bays are the nearest to the supermarket entrance apart from the disabled bays, and most motorists wont use these.

    #141744 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    I have just ordered my new car, a PHEV, I have noticed when we go to our local Aldi supermarket where there are two charging bays next to the disabled parking bays, that there often cars parked in the two bays that are not charging them, they look for the most of the time that these cars are ordinary diesel or petrol cars. The problem is these bays are the nearest to the supermarket entrance apart from the disabled bays, and most motorists wont use these.

    They are probably staff cars, we have the same at our local Tesco a Outlander PHEV plugged in all day virtually every day, the EV charger flashing full the majority of the day, it just a fact of life.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #141759 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    You’ll find that BEV drivers don’t rely on 7kW AC charging posts as part of their journeying, if they are there at a stop then plugging in for an hour whilst you have lunch is great but not critical to a journey, the only time they matter that much is when all the faster chargers in the area have failed & they risk being stranded.

    So, the 7kW AC chargers at the Aldi being blocked is perhaps rude but look back over the years & see how these posts were put in & then simply not used anyway as there were so few EVs around. My local Asda has teh same issue, two out of the 4 charging spaces always blocked by the same PHEVs that are never charging. Don’t rely on them being available.

    With a PHEV, always leave home with a full charge, and always plug in at the destination if you can using AC posts or a domestic socket, don’t forget to unplug once charged. It’s the leaving home fully charged that will add up the electric miles the most.

    Try to leave a 7kW post at overnight destinations for BEVs that will need to charge for around 7 hours.

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