Brexit?

This topic contains 196 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  fwippers 12 hours, 46 minutes ago.

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  • #93237 Reply

    POPS
    Moderator

    This is the place for reasoned comment or questions about Brexit …. Posts must stay respectful at all times even when we believe that other posters are wrong.

Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 196 total)
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  • #93361 Reply

    Brydo

    I think we all feel the same about labour wigwam.

    fwippers can you help me out, I don’t know what is provocative in my post, if my post is offensive in any way then what’s the point of debate?

    #93365 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    I see the parliamentary leader of the fiscally incompetent populist SNP, Ian Blackford, doesn’t think his voters in Ross, Skye and Lochaber will be able to find their way to the polling stations in the bleak midwinter and it’s unfair to have a GE in December.

    Provocative enough?

    #93368 Reply

    Menorca Mike
    Participant

    Wigwam like you I don’t live in Scotland but I respect Ian’s views I think he is a good speaker he has a lovely wife and family and he answers questions etc

    BBC Breakfast expert, VW Golf driver.

    #93372 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    I think we all know what Ian Blackford looks like, Mike but no idea who the woman is.

    #93374 Reply

    POPS
    Moderator

    I happen to agree with Brydo that candidate selection in these vacated seats will show a distinct move to the right. After all, most of the candidates not standing are centrists or those that have had the whip removed for disagreeing with distinctly right wing led policy. It makes sense to assume that the PM wants to strengthen the far right of his government benches in the next election.  The same goes (only left) for the few vacated Labour seats.

    I also believe that Labour is controlled by the extreme left of the party. Seumas Milne and Momentum have an iron grip on Jeremy Corbyn to the point that they are totally unelectable at this moment in time (in my opinion)

    The Lib Dems and the Brexit party have both taken opposite ends of the Brexit argument, but have made sure they remain “minority parties” as they they will both stand on a “Single Issue manifesto” and will convince no one that they have an agenda for running the country on a day to day basis. They will no doubt have an influence on the way individual constituencies end up being represented, but that’s as far as they can go (again in my opinion).

    My view is that the conservatives will win the next GE, but I wouldn’t like to predict whether they will gain a workable majority (if I were to guess I think it unlikely).

    Perhaps it’s time for the creation of a new “Centre Party” formed by an amalgamation of the reasonable minded decent politicians on both sides whose function has been taken away from then by two groups of zealots. One thing’s for sure, we cannot hope to improve the UK while Parliament remains in the grip of two parties controlled by polar opposite extremes.

    This is only my own personal view of things folks.

    #93380 Reply

    Menorca Mike
    Participant

    I didn’t know Ian was a sheep farmer 

    BBC Breakfast expert, VW Golf driver.

    #93386 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    A fair summary POPS. Of course in times past the Liberals were the centre party.  Seems the Libdems have now become a single cause party like the Brexit party.

    #93388 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    Although I disagree with you on one thing, POPS, the Tory MPs who had the whip removed was because of the position they took on Brexit.  Brexit is not rightwing.

    #93392 Reply

    POPS
    Moderator

    Although I disagree with you on one thing, POPS, the Tory MPs who had the whip removed was because of the position they took on Brexit. Brexit is not rightwing.

    You may be right Wigwam, but my recollection is that it was because they were against a “No Deal” exit (which they saw as being ERG generated) and were not against leaving with a deal. At the beginning of September they voted to block “No Deal” but undertook to support a Brexit Deal when it was achieved.

     

    #93400 Reply

    brydo

    Winter election: What difference does it make?

    On Monday, MPs are expected to consider the prime minister’s call for an election on 12 December. UK elections usually take place in May or June – the last December election was in 1923 – so what difference might a winter election make?

    Are all the polling stations booked up?
    Elections are huge organisational feats. Millions of polling cards have to be distributed. Postal votes need to be sent. And thousands of school halls, churches and community centres have to be booked to be used as polling stations.

    The worry is that lots of these locations will already be booked up in mid-December for Christmas events.

    Laura Lock, of the Association of Electoral Administrators, says her members have been making calls, and finding many of the usual venues already have bookings.

    “We will find polling stations,” she told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme – but they might not be where people expect. Voters could find themselves casting their ballots in garages or under caravan awnings.

    And the counting of votes, which takes many hours and relies on volunteers, may also have to take place in similarly makeshift locations.

    Will bad weather stop people voting?
    This is an enduring idea which instinctively feels right. In the cold and damp December weather, surely people will be less inclined to turn out and vote.

    However, experts say there is no evidence from the UK to suggest that bad weather stops people from voting.

    Research from the University of Oxford found virtually no correlation between the weather and turnout – instead people are more likely to vote if the election race is close and there is a strong difference between the leading parties.

    They are far less likely to vote if it feels like a foregone conclusion, or the main candidates seem relatively close in their political outlook.

    What about shorter days?
    As in the case of polling stations, the shorter winter days provide a logistical challenge for election organisers.

    Some are already planning to buy in temporary street lighting for health and safety reasons, according to Laura Lock.

    They may also have to make practical provisions for bad weather like hiring gritters and ensuring extra transport for people who find it harder to get out to vote.

    As for whether shorter days might put people off voting, we don’t have evidence for that.

    Prof Sir John Curtice at Strathclyde University told the BBC that in the post-war period there have been two winter elections in February, and both had high turnouts.

    Both shorter days and poor weather might make life more difficult for people knocking on doors during the campaign.

    Will it stop students voting?
    It was suggested when Prime Minister Boris Johnson attempted to call an election for mid-October that this could limit the student vote. At the beginning of the academic year, many would not yet have had time to register to vote in their new places of residence.

    If an election happens on 12 December, which is close to the end of term, that could also cause confusion about whether students should be registered at home or near to where they’re studying.

    But this issue is more about calling an election at short notice than because it’s winter.

    #93412 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    I hear Jeremy Corbyn doesn’t want to be Prime Minister so he’ll hold out until 5th May 2022 when he will say he’s too old.

    #93414 Reply

    brydo

    Works for me, I think he was born living in the past.

    #93416 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    #93421 Reply

    brydo

    All good things come to those who wait wigwam. I would get used to waiting as labour would be mad to agree to one just now. More beneficial to have BJ looking impotent for as long as he can as he has the habit of making promises he cannot keep.

    #93424 Reply

    Andy52
    Participant

    I wish everyone happy debating but I am going to conclude with this post. For me there have been too many unsavoury and provocative posts and I no longer wish to contribute to this or be part of it.

     

    I thought this thread was quite subdued compared to its predecessor. Something that you may or may not notice is that the electorate in Scotland is wide awake. Political debate can get a bit more heated than down south although Brexit is turning more people off than on. The debate up here focuses on Independence as much as Brexit and this despite the SNP not really mentioning it much. The Tory party in Scotland mentions it every day when they say the SNP should stop “banging” on about Independence when they are the ones who raise it in the first place.

    I hope England and Wales get the Brexit they voted for but I also think that Scotland should get a say in its implementation here. If we have to go our separate ways to achieve this then so be it.

    #93560 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    Of course you had a say the same as everyone else.  But if, after Brexit is done (if it ever is) the Scottish voters want to leave the UK then absolutely they should.

    #93595 Reply

    callmejohn

    Hi Brydo my friend

    Can I please take a (late) opportunity to respond to your detailed, as always, views on a December Election.

    The last December held General Election was indeed in 1923, however it was on 6th December and was mostly a dry day, with a turnout of 71%. However the Met Office are predicting a very severe winter this year, which I feel will have an impact on the turnout, as someone who has sat (wheelchair user) outside a polling station for five hours each election in recent years.

    Although we have had non summer elections in the past, we have had 71% – 83%  turnouts since 1922 but never reached 70% since the the turn of the century, although we had 72% at the Brexit Referendum in 2016.

    I honestly don’t think that we would have a problem getting polling stations, as someone who ran a chess club and top chess tournaments for 20 years using council halls, we always had our booked lets cancelled whenever there was an election Local or General, which is the same in schools. Even if they have to bring in mobile police indecent vehicles or national health mobile vehicles, they could run an election, other than the issue of the weather.

    As for the many polling station volunteers, I can assure you that will not be a problem as although they are volunteers, they are very well paid volunteers who are only too happy to take a day of work to get a much better day’s pay.

    I think the bigger problem with a General Election  is that it would only be fought on the issue of Brexit, therefor would it not be better to hold an up to date referendum on Brexit and abide by whatever that vote is, as the politicians are not getting anywhere with the issue.

    #93641 Reply

    fwippers
    Participant

    I feel I should comment as many of the comments made were done so without full information and when I said I felt I should refrain from further comment I now know the information which was put out by the political parties was incorrect, misleading and I feel a new thread should be started  as I now feel the posters have indeed changed their minds! familiar ring? was in desperate need of coffee yesterday!

    #93654 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    Now, I don’t want to go over old ground. But I will. Sighs all round…

    In 2016 in full knowledge of the facts, a majority of voters chose that the UK should leave the EU. The facts being that leaving the EU meant regaining our independence from the EU.

    Subsequently it has transpired that the Establishment of the UK had and has no intention of carrying out the mandate of the people.

    So that’s where we are.

    #93667 Reply

    fwippers
    Participant

    Indeed, a vociferous campaign took place, various facts and information was presented to the UK public, whom I should add are intelligent well informed people  who took a decision to leave the EU ( which was described at the time as leaving the Customs Union, single market and other institutions). If our MP’s have no desire to carry out this then they are complicit in deception and will be punished severely. When the passed the referendum legislation very few if any anticipated a Leave vote. I have no idea whats going to happen next but will follow with interest.

    #93668 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    Fwippers, recommend one these to save going out in this foul weather.

    #93714 Reply

    fwippers
    Participant

    Hi, I have a delonghi. makes great coffee but service from company lousy. dont want to say more and get into hot water with mods!

    #93715 Reply

    Wigwam
    Participant

    Bought mine from John Lewis to get their two year guarantee!

    #93717 Reply

    Menorca Mike
    Participant

    I knew wigwam shopped at John Lewis I would say he is quite well off

    BBC Breakfast expert, VW Golf driver.

    #93719 Reply

    fwippers
    Participant

    Regarding the extension:-

    The French want this

    The Germans want that

    Write them all down

    And draw the winner from a hat!

    Problem solved.

Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 196 total)
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