‘At £30,000+ too many electric cars are out of reach for the average worker’

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  • #135454 Reply
    Brydo

    Mike Rutherford thinks most electric cars are out of reach for the majority of new car buyers

    We’re in for another eventful, but strangely unpredictable, motoring year. The only thing I can guarantee for 2021 is that car tyres will be black, round and rubbery. At this early, still-sleepy stage of the game, pretty much everything else is clouded or swamped by an atmosphere of uncertainty. That said, 2021 has got to be an improvement on last year, hasn’t it? With Covid still a threat, remind yourself that personal, centrally locked cars (not to be confused with taxis and self-drive rental vehicles) will still be the wisest, most valuable, all-weather tools for those seeking a combination of freedom and safe, secure, sanitised social distancing, 24/7.

    Electric vehicle sales are likely to rise sharply – but only if they’re within the reach of the masses, whose personal finances currently dictate that small-to-medium pure-electric cars be priced closer to £20k. Fact is, the £30k-plus territory that far too many EVs occupy is prohibitively expensive for the average working man or woman, never mind the growing number of redundant folk, pensioners, students and other consumers, whose idea of affordability is inconsistent with what most car makers think.

    But on a more optimistic note, the likes of Citroen, Fiat, Renault and dark horse Dacia appreciate the importance of sub-£20k electric cars. And surely the cranking up of modest-EV production by the world’s volume makers will mean far greater economies of scale, which, in turn, means more competition and lower prices. Pure-electric cars are comparatively rare on UK roads, and will remain so in 2021 – unless a major scrappage scheme is launched to speed up the planned extinction of diesel and petrol cars. My sources tell me that it – scrappage – could and should happen in the months ahead.

    More likely is that politicians and environmentalists will continue to wage war on law-abiding, car-using men, women and kids, especially in vehicles with combustion engines. There are already strong signs that the barely legal mugging of motorists is to be ramped up. For example Central and Inner London, which already has daily ‘Congestion’ and ‘Ultra Low Emission Zone’ charges, is considering a crackpot proposal to slap entry fees on folk travelling into Greater London by car. After that, a similar scam for Greater Manchester, perhaps? And in the longer term, don’t be surprised if entry fees are rolled out further.

    I’m not trying to scare you, I’m just sounding another warning that it’s only a matter of time before additional flat fees, or pay-per-mile tolls – or both – are greedily snatched from car occupants needing to drive into certain urban and rural areas. That’s why it’s more important than ever to plan where you live, the type of personal or family mobility vehicle you’ll use, and how you can cut your annual mileage, plus those rising direct road charges.

    In 2021, we motorists need to shop clever, drive clever, refuel and park clever. Those hated existing and imminent road charges, tolls and entrance fees, we must do our best to avoid. In doing so, we won’t fall into the cynical, revenue-raising traps set for us by not-so-clever politicians and environmentalists. That, the greedy so-and-sos, would not like.

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 42 total)
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  • #135475 Reply
    mitch
    Participant

    there are two things that prevent people from switching to an ev at the moment, the cost of the vehicles themselves and the availability of charge points.

    until the government takes action on those the take up will be slower than it could be.

    lesser things are the size of vehicles available and the range but range is less and less of a problem with better batteries and education of drivers about manageing journies and charging. it would also be helped if the govt got a grip on rolling out chargers.

    whats wrong with insisting all new build houses have chargers built in by law.

    #135486 Reply
    Southamman

    Some nonsense really. Most peopke who cannot Ford brand new electric vehicles, cannot afford new xars today.

    the majority of buyers are eith company car drivers, or people leasing at £300 plus each month.

    those who can’t, will continue to buy second hand vehicles

    #135490 Reply
    RICHARD WAITES

    I can’t see much changing in 2021 with regards to ev numbers. The charging infrastructure is woefully inadequate and the cost of the actual vehicles is way too high. Couple this with the situation many people are finding themselves in at the moment and I can’t see an ev being high on many peoples list of priorities. For the time being they are for those living somewhere that happens to have plenty of charging points, a large disposable income and who tends to make shorter journeys most of the time.

    #135493 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    One would hope that economies of scale will soon bring down the price of EVs. They have far fewer components and moving parts and when battery production gets sorted will be far cheaper to make. However, the greed of manufacturers and government taxation will override the laws of economics, methinks, and we will continue to pay over the odds.

    As a Motability lessor I could have had an EV this time (one year back) but the choice then was poor. Offerings were too slow, too short-range or too big (I don’t want an SUV!). If ID3 was on scheme then, I’d have had one. Some other scheme cars also tempting now: Kia and Honda are getting better.

    #135497 Reply
    NanasRob71

    Mike Rutherford has always been a bit of a dinosaur. I wouldn’t put much stock in his comments.

    #135501 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Charging points is a real issue and the various companies schemes. Would it be beyond the wit of man (or woman) to sell electricity like petrol?  Take a debit/credit card at the machine and just advertise and sell at £xx per kWh.  Or am I missing something?

    #135509 Reply
    joss
    Moderator

    I know I will get howled at but…the Government has set the date for getting rid of Petrol and Diesel vehicles. Should they not then be nationalisation of the power grid for electric vehicles. To Plan and build the network.

    Then sell the power to customers at one fixed national price point. So everyone pays the same no matter where they charge? Save for domestic home charging.

    At the moment the charging points are few and far between.

    Joss
    *** ***
    Current car BMW X2 2.0i Sport sDrive Auto 2019 with Sport pack
    Last car Ford Focus Titanium 1.5 TDCI
    Builder of Gaming PC's

    #135510 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    I know I will get howled at but…the Government has set the date for getting rid of Petrol and Diesel vehicles. Should they not then be nationalisation of the power grid for electric vehicles. To Plan and build the network. Then sell the power to customers at one fixed national price point. So everyone pays the same no matter where they charge? Save for domestic home charging. At the moment the charging points are few and far between.

    I have to admit Joss it is a bit like the wild west, rather than nationalisation may be very strict regulations ?


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #135512 Reply
    joss
    Moderator

    @Oscarmax

    Yes, I would certainly advocate very strict regulations.

    Joss
    *** ***
    Current car BMW X2 2.0i Sport sDrive Auto 2019 with Sport pack
    Last car Ford Focus Titanium 1.5 TDCI
    Builder of Gaming PC's

    #135520 Reply
    mitch
    Participant

    i agree with joss the govt really needs to get a grip on renewables all round it would be simple and relatively cheap to insist all new build houses must have solar panels, battery storage and a car charging point. street chargers too if its a new estate.

    if they have to do it at the planning and design stage costs are minimal.

    #135524 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    The problem with the various charging point companies needs fixed ASAP. Having to join this “club” and that is a nonsense. Stick your card in the machine and pay for it simple.

    I dont think it would be cheap, although very desirable, to add battery storage to a new house unless it was a very small battery, Teslas battery is about £6,000 then more to fit, but the solar panels and charging point would be about £5,000 combined.

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 22 hours ago by Brydo.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #135534 Reply
    Harry

    Im going to enjoy the combustion engine for as long as i can. Electric cars seem soulless to me.

    #135555 Reply
    Brydo

    Harry you will have at least a decade to enjoy your ICE car, longer if you are happy to buy second hand, but the change is coming.

    Richard there will be plenty happening, EV wise in 2021. The EV numbers will only increase and this, as we see happening now, will have an impact on the number of EV’s on the scheme.

    #135578 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    The problem with the various charging point companies needs fixed ASAP. Having to join this “club” and that is a nonsense. Stick your card in the machine and pay for it simple. I dont think it would be cheap, although very desirable, to add battery storage to a new house unless it was a very small battery, Teslas battery is about £6,000 then more to fit, but the solar panels and charging point would be about £5,000 combined.

    Brydo I have browsed Octopus Energy scheme am I right in thinking EV like the Nissan Leaf can be used as a battery storage bank. This could seriously smooth out the grid, possibly charging up at off peak to use throughout the home in the day.

     


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #135579 Reply
    RICHARD WAITES

    Granted Brydo but my comments are still relevant. Ok at the moment for those who can afford it and happen to live in the right location. For most, still an awful long way to go.

    #135590 Reply
    Brydo

    Especially for the disabled Richard, EV charging points, and the location of the chargers on the car, are not designed for ease of use if you have mobility issues.

    #135602 Reply
    martinod

    brydo thats what i was thinking trying to connect the charge cable would be difficult on a lot of them.

    the MG ev charge port looks so difficult to access  even with it open you need to bend down

    #135605 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant
    #135631 Reply
    Phil

    Theres places in the UK that haven’t even got broadband in their households, yet we’re expected to believe that the government will change the course of how everyone drives in less than 10 year?

    Many will jump on board with electric cars, but the government will be nowhere near that figure.

    #135632 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Of course not Phil. And the government knows that too, but they won’t be around then to care one way or the other.

    #135660 Reply
    Brydo

    Remember guys over 50% of the population could have a home charger so  right away the day to day charging needs are massively reduced. During this decade the speed at which batteries charge will increase significantly to that of filling an ICE car. Things are moving very quickly and I suggest the range of everyday BEVs will be 300-400 before the end of the decade.

    #135870 Reply
    machoco

    Its not the charging its the vast impracticalities involving electric cars that just wont work for millions of disabled people.

    All well and good having someone that isnt driving and charging the car for you but for those who do its just not good enough.

     

    ‘Talk’ the talk but not ‘Walking’ the walk comes to mind

    #135874 Reply
    Brydo

    machoco there are disabled on the forum who are driving EV’s, can you be a bit more specific about the “impracticalities” that the “millions of disabled” couldn’t cope with, after all an EV is just an ICE car with a battery instead of an engine.

    If you are correct and millions of disabled can’t use EV’s we have a major problem.

    #135881 Reply
    machoco

    Need disabled charging bays.

    For some waiting more than is necessary can cause pain fatigue and all sorts including issues with bathrooms etc

    Many have issues with dexterity

    You realize not eveyone can be pigeon holed ‘Brydo’

     

    As i understand you yourself have no disablility, but could you envision your wife doing it comfortably with no hassle etc

     

     

    Many have mobility issues like being in a wheelchair or not able to bend or even comfortably hold the cables to plug in.

    #135889 Reply
    Brydo

    There are trials with regard to wireless electric car charging, have a look at this and see what you think.

    I think this means of charging will answer all your concerns.

    Not sure why you have a problem with me being able bodied, do you think only disabled people should be allowed to post on this forum?

    https://www.carmagazine.co.uk/electric/what-is-electric-car-wireless-charging-wevc-and-how-does-it-work-/

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