Good PIP Experiences

This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  MikeFromLFEW 2 weeks, 4 days ago.

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    Topic
  • #96063 Reply

    John Newton
    Participant

    Hi everyone, I have recently had my assessment for my transfer from DLA to PIP and was terrified as you can imagine. Well the day came and the lady couldn’t have been nicer, I should say I am blind and have some mental issues and because of information they had she asked a few things then played with my guide dog William. I thought I would take weeksto hear from them, but two days later I got the dreaded letter. Thankfully I stay on enhanced mobility which took a massive weight and stress off me and as a bit of a shock they moved me to enhanced living. So has anyone else had a good or at leastnot  a horrible one ? This is my first post my car is a Skoda Superb 2ltr turbo we need the huge boot I think my next will be the Citroen C5 Aircross.

     

    • This topic was modified 1 month ago by  John Newton.
Viewing 18 replies - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #96073 Reply

    KerryB
    Participant

    I have had two terrible and one great experiences with PIP assessments.

    Two of my (adult) children are autistic, dyslexic, dyspraxic and ADHD and one of them has PTSD after having been raped in school at age 14. Neither can manage their own affairs, or get around without assistance in terms of guidance (both are physically mobile, so that was never going to be an issue). In both cases, the assessments found them totally normal and both had their DLA stopped with no PIP. In both cases, the clear evidence of physical issues and mental issues was observed and commented on by the assessor at the time but in the reports, both assessors said nothing was observed at all.

    In one case, my daughter was observed attempting to drink a cup of tea. The cup was half full and she still spilled most of it lifting it to her mouth. She also ended up in floods of tears as the assessor gave her the third degree about the rape, but the report said that she was completely calm and composed throughout the assessment.

    I am challenging the report, needless to say.

    Neither of these two would have been eligible (I assume) for mobility, but both need full time care and are unable to live independently, so I had assumed that the care element would have continued.

    On the other hand, my own assessment was a totally different story. The assessor was brilliant, kind, observant (pointing out things I hadn’t thought to mention) and I was awarded enhanced for both elements. It possibly helped that I physically fell while she was in the house…

    My own observations suggest that an obvious ‘visible’ disability is treated fairly but any form of invisible disability or mental incapacity is not delat with as fairly.

    This is in Northern Ireland, by the way. In theory it’s the same system (Capita run the assessments and make the judgements), but in practice there may be differences from the mainland UK.

    #96082 Reply

    John Newton
    Participant

    Hi Kerry I’m glad your assesment well and I’m stunned but not shocked at how your kids were treated that is adisgrace I hope someone sees sense for the appeals good luck with it.

    #96090 Reply

    ChrisK
    Participant

    Hi John

    That’s good news John, my transition from DLA to PIP had good and bad where I lost higher rate mobility and Motability car but where I had previously had middle rate care they gave me the top level care.

    I went to the appeals courts and the judge and doctor gave me maximum time (10 years) award for higher rate mobility so now have both at the top rate so about £30 a week better off but it was 6 months of sleepless night before the court case that I won.

    I could never understand how they agreed I needed all the extra care while confined to my four walls but as soon as I step out of the front door I did not even get enough money to maintain my pavement scooter no matter a car.

    Still all ended well.

    #96100 Reply

    Mossfinn

    My transfer from DLA to PIP happened last year. The assessor came out to my place, was very pleasant and friendly. Having heard bad things about assessments, I was on edge, especially when she said we wouldn’t even try a few of the tests as she knew I wouldn’t be able to do them.

    She finished up by telling me she was recommending enhanced for both sections , which was a step up on the care element and within a week I got the letter confirming indefinite enhanced for both.

     

    #96108 Reply

    Philjb

    Mine went as well as I expected but I have pretty obvious skeletal disabilities so was awarded enhanced both, for 10 years the max for pip then just a paper review when that s up.

    I was nervous still as you hear the horror stories so often. But I had a really nice assessor, must have been my lucky day?

    #96109 Reply

    John Newton
    Participant

    So glad to hear that Mossfinn I wonder if it’s all down to how good or bad the essor is

    #96128 Reply

    bfoandc

    I was first transferred to PIP from DLA in April 2017.

    The assessor came to our house and was polite but spent quite a long time talking about irrelevant things. I requested a copy of the report and so had that when the letter arrived which moved me from higher mobility to standard rate PIP.

    I went through the report and found a number of issues. I divided them into: Factual Errors, General Concerns, Specific Issues with the report, Comments on ‘tests’ and then I showed how some of the errors might have misled the decision maker. This meant that I could use this for the compulsory reconsideration process.

    When the result of the reconsideration came through I had been awarded enhanced mobility!

    I’m now awaiting the result of my first PIP review!

    #96152 Reply

    vinalspin
    Participant

    My experience was much like the rest, a few attempts and an appeal to get enhanced Mobility and standard Care, what I am impressed with is your driving skills whilst blind, awesome, although you can probably drive better than most I’ve experienced lately!  ???

    #96213 Reply

    Mossfinn

    @John Newton

    John, I think ultimately it is down to the assessor. Although the new system of points aims to make it more objective rather than subjective, it still relies on the opinion of the assessor.

    My assessor was very friendly from the start, had thoroughly researched my disability as it is caused by an illness suffered by only a couple of others in the U.K. and still being researched. A lot of it is hidden but her research helped her understand that. A less diligent or sympathetic assessor may have caused more problems.

    #96223 Reply

    John Newton
    Participant

    Hi @vinalspin I just had some minor scrapes lol. There will be no stopping me when those self driving cars arrive

    #96644 Reply

    Elliot
    Participant

    I had my PIP assessment around 6-8 weeks ago. Today I got my award letter saying I had been awarded standard care and enhanced mobility. When I read the report however it sounded nothing like how I was on the day. The assessor said I looked well with a good complexion where as I had just been released from hospital and was looking and feeling terrible.

    I’m sure they make these things up just to keep the benefits down.

    #96801 Reply

    Mark Strugnell

    Kerryb

    Even without physical problems you can get the mobility component if you can prove that the claimant cannot complete a journey either familiar or unfamiliar without significant assistance.

    Google pip guidance notes for information.

    I got enhanced mobility for my autistic son .the dwp caved in before it got to tribunal

    #96803 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    I suppose I have been quite fortunate, previously I had a very bad ESA assessment so bad my GP personally got involved, my wife took me into to our local jobcentre the manager was a bit horrified (her father had dementia) and put us in touch with a local charity, who also contacted the local conservative MP. End result full award.

    For many years on DLA I had be on the higher rate of mobility, but the low rate of personal care, when I had to change to PIP I was obviously terrified, my GP sent me for some assessments, who produced a report, they contacted Citizen Advice on behalf who in turn filled in the assessment.

    I had a paper assessment 24 point Motability and 24 point for care for five and half years.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #96804 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    I have had two terrible and one great experiences with PIP assessments. Two of my (adult) children are autistic, dyslexic, dyspraxic and ADHD and one of them has PTSD after having been raped in school at age 14. Neither can manage their own affairs, or get around without assistance in terms of guidance (both are physically mobile, so that was never going to be an issue). In both cases, the assessments found them totally normal and both had their DLA stopped with no PIP. In both cases, the clear evidence of physical issues and mental issues was observed and commented on by the assessor at the time but in the reports, both assessors said nothing was observed at all. In one case, my daughter was observed attempting to drink a cup of tea. The cup was half full and she still spilled most of it lifting it to her mouth. She also ended up in floods of tears as the assessor gave her the third degree about the rape, but the report said that she was completely calm and composed throughout the assessment. I am challenging the report, needless to say. Neither of these two would have been eligible (I assume) for mobility, but both need full time care and are unable to live independently, so I had assumed that the care element would have continued. On the other hand, my own assessment was a totally different story. The assessor was brilliant, kind, observant (pointing out things I hadn’t thought to mention) and I was awarded enhanced for both elements. It possibly helped that I physically fell while she was in the house… My own observations suggest that an obvious ‘visible’ disability is treated fairly but any form of invisible disability or mental incapacity is not delat with as fairly. This is in Northern Ireland, by the way. In theory it’s the same system (Capita run the assessments and make the judgements), but in practice there may be differences from the mainland UK.

    Kerryb

    reference my above post of my 24 point mobility award, I received 12 points because I need to accompanied at all times


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #96805 Reply

    KerryB
    Participant

    Kerryb Even without physical problems you can get the mobility component if you can prove that the claimant cannot complete a journey either familiar or unfamiliar without significant assistance. Google pip guidance notes for information. I got enhanced mobility for my autistic son .the dwp caved in before it got to tribunal

    This is why I felt my two both qualified for at least some payment. Neither can complete a journey without assistance and both need accompanying everywhere.

    I am challenging the daughter’s claim, although there have been a series of errors on the part of Capita that have left this stringing along for over fifteen months so far since the original decision and the end of payments, but my own health is so poor (I have recently been diagnosed with a brain tumour, on top of my existing arthritic condition) that I have no energy to pursue my son’s claim. They have worn me down, and knocked the fight out of me by a series of petty actions that have just drained me of the will to challenge anything.

    The system seems to be weighted against those who need the most help, and our own GP is no help at all either. To quote my daughter’s GP: “I’ve seen people with terminal cancer refused PIP, so what on earth makes you think your daughter deserves anything?” Say no more.

    I’m a pretty upbeat, optimistic person in general, but this is just soul-destroying.

    #96886 Reply

    Mark Strugnell

    So sorry to hear the way you have been treated. With your own health conditions it must be impossible to fight the dwp for someone else as well.

    I have found the tribunal judges to be somewhat fairer than the dwp.

    I put on paper how it would be impossible for my son to carry out the journey and described his problems.

     

    I hope things work out well for your family. And maybe things will change soon after the election.

    #96887 Reply

    KerryB
    Participant

    Thank you, @mark Strugnell. I sincerely hope so.

    #97525 Reply

    MikeFromLFEW
    Participant

    My wife’s first PIP assessment last year was excellent. We didn’t have any of the unpleasantness or ‘deceit’ we were led to expect. We’d agree that it wasn’t a nice experience, but no worse than a consultation with an unfamiliar hospital doctor.
    Against my worst fears my wife got standard care and enhanced mobility.

    A relative had a very different exerience in recent weeks where the assessor spent less than 15 minutes and, while not unpleasant, did not perform – in our view – a full assessment. Needless to say, they have had their claim rejected.

    I do wonder what the balance between the assessment and the appropriate completion of the claim form is on the outcome.

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