Jock, taffy, paddy ?

  • This topic has 9 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by Georgie.
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  • #161667 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    What’s the English name equivalent to the names associated with the other three home nations

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

Viewing 9 replies - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #161682 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Is there no similar English name?

    I always associate “Trev” as a stereotypical English name but surely there must be one out there.

    It could be the English decided on the other three and couldn’t be bothered coming up with one for themselves lol.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #161684 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    There is no similar word for the English because they are terms used by the English to differentiate the inferior position of people from those places.

    #161689 Reply
    POPS
    Moderator

    We’re known as Brits, Poms, Limeys etc to people in different countries, but we don’t use a slang word for ourselves as nicknames are bestowed upon us by the non English.

    #161690 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    RosBeef, mes amis!

    #161693 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    But surely,  all those names refer to the British in general, not the English specifically.

    #161696 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    RosBeef, mes amis!

    Rosbif. 😉

    Sassenach comes to mind. Unless i’m misunderstanding something here.

    It’s a “nickname” for english people, by scottish – not my fault that those usually aren’t.. flattering.

    #161698 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Sassenach works as a Scottish name for the English but it’s not generic. The Welsh or the Irish wouldn’t use it.

    I wouldn’t be offended being called a Sassenach. It’s true meaning is a Saxon.

    #161712 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    True.

    I have been taught a few names for the english in local (welsh) pubs, which i think are pretty universally used by the scottish and irish too – not very palatable for forums though, lol.

     

    #161771 Reply
    Georgie

    Every Tom, Dick and Harry?  John Smith?  English Tommy?

    I rather like Les goddams, coined by the French in the Middle Ages because of all the swearing they heard from English soldiers during the Hundred Years War.

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