MFillingham

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  • in reply to: High End EVs – a comparison (ID5, Enyaq, Ariya) #205506
    MFillingham
    Participant

      Really one needs to test drive the cars, not just sit in them and see how they actually work for you and most importantly drive. Often though the model you want is not the one you test drive but gives you some idea. Every car I had on the scheme ticked all my boxes but was the best feeling and practical car on my shortlist. Seems like you got your shortlist together and for me the test drive would be the deciding factor. After all you then got to drive it for 3 years minimum and the more money in ap you spend, the more important it is imo to get the decision right, and not regret it. Fuuny thing also is that the dealers will get the same fee even if the cars more in ap so some might not be as welcoming as others and that’s another factor to consider, although that also doesn’t mean it translates to good aftercare and service. I personally wouldn’t get another car that didn’t have seperate heater controls or that virtually everything was controlled by the infotainment screen or voice as I don’t really want to talk to the car and if you have an accent would it understand you? By the time you done that all, one could of demisted the front windscreen already. No matter which car we’ve had that’s always been an issue and happens regularly.

       

      I agree, obviously sitting in a car doesn’t tell you how it deals with bumps, for example.  However, phase one was to take a long list and shrink it, some of which was simple online research, some was obvious from existing experience and some needed to actually see the inside to understand what I’m looking at/for.

       

      My next stage will be a period of reflection.  It’s a lot of money for something I’m going to need to renew in 3-5 years time (which, given I’ve never owned a car for longer than 3 years is going to mean I have to get this absolutely right).  I need to reflect on just what my priorities should be, I know I can be a proper tech geek and rapidly progress nice to haves into must haves for no real reason.  So I’ll take a while to ensure I’m not adding stuff I don’t need.

       

      Then phase 3 starts, it means getting others to get in/out the car, just to be sure they can, and driving with my family in 2 or 3 cars only.  This might include the Megane or something else that comes on scheme or it could just be the Ariya and one other.  Then it’ll be a little forced reflection.  This isn’t a commitment for a 12 month car, so I need to be sure it meets current and short term future needs, can I go any distance in it, can I get in/out easily, can I park it in a normal bay (the size of some of these cars is literally begging for the paintwork to be abused by others).  Can I get into my drive, it’s a tricky turn potentially around a parked car into a tightish gateway.  Is the charging port in the right place for reversing into the drive?  If it’s not, can I get a charger better placed and how much will that cost?

       

      Finally, I’ll have either all the answers or I’m back at square one but no longer looking at electric and feeling pretty grumpy about that.

      I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
      I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

      Mark

      MFillingham
      Participant

        They’ve a partnership with BP Pulse network where you’re a subscribed member for the term of your lease and get discounted rates.  This means the 150KW chargers are 55p instead of 69p, although it must be noted this may not be the cheapest around.

         

        It’s hardly a shock that charging prices have shot up, just look at domestic bills, despite their heavy protection, let alone business contracts.

        I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
        I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

        Mark

        in reply to: High End EVs – a comparison (ID5, Enyaq, Ariya) #205498
        MFillingham
        Participant

          Totally agree with most of your points. I’m lucky I suppose in that when I ordered my Ariya there wasn’t as much choice for a larger EV. I also ordered before the price rise back in June. Still a lot of money I know but the ap I’m paying would be very competitive with the EVs you mentioned, maybe even better. I ordered a Ariya with the Bose tech pack ( upgraded sound, headup display and upgraded rear view mirror) and the 22kw on board charger. One small point I don’t think the centre arm rest moves on the Ariya Advance, which is the one on Motability. I managed to have a good look at the Megan and I must admit I really liked it, very stylish design inside, seats felt really comfortable ( didn’t drive it just sat in it for five minutes) and it’s the same as the Ariya underneath. The only negatives for me is the boot, and it didn’t feel as light and airy inside the cabin as the Ariya or ID5

          Good points, thank you.  I didn’t check the moving consol as it’s just a toy and wasn’t that important but would be nice to play with for all of 5 minutes.

           

          MFillingham, one other thing well two. The cost of the paint is if you want a black roof is bloody expensive with Nissan it’s £ 850ish for Motability customers it’s over £ 1300 for retail. Second point, when I go to a dealer to view a model I never tell them I’m a Motability customer, until I’m ready to order it’s none of their business.

           

          I was impressed that all solid colours, including metalics were free, the two tone with the black roof is more but, to be honest, I’m less keen on that.  I did like the blue they had on a number of cars in the showroom, polished properly it really shone.  I’m not a monochrome type of guy, there’s too many black/white/ shades of grey on the roads as it is.

           

          The reason for telling them why I was there was to check how they treated me.  As much from curiosity but also because I know some treat us like second grade customers while others properly appreciate what’s on offer.  I felt it a shame that the Skoda guy came out on top, really keen to bend over backwards if necessary to ensure I knew everything I needed to but the car just came up short.  Meanwhile, nobody has been particularly offish except the one Renault guy who may have just been in a rush to do something else.  As I said, when I feel up to it, I may try again as the car sounds really good but I still need to try accessing it for myself to know whether it’ll work for us.

          I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
          I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

          Mark

          in reply to: Skoda Enyaq #205472
          MFillingham
          Participant

            Try the Renault out it’s very nice tbh no electric seats I’m 6 foot and it’s just step in and step out no up or down really (well a little down)

             

            Yes, I’ve explained a bit more here about my Renault experience – https://forum.whichmobilitycar.co.uk/forums/topic/high-end-evs-a-comparison-id5-enyaq-ariya/  I’ll try again hoping for a better salesperson.

            I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
            I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

            Mark

            in reply to: Skoda Enyaq #205409
            MFillingham
            Participant

              Today I got to the Nissan showroom.  I must start off by saying I expected big things.

               

              Sat in the car, it’s really comfortable. For cloth seats it’s easy to get in, electric adjustment really helped.  Then I looked at a dash that looked like it was designed recently, much more so than the other two.  The floor, however, does feel high.  It’s the only car I’ve got in and wondered if others could get in, both my mum and father in law can manage the ZS but with some difficulty, this wasn’t easier.

               

              Here’s where a lot of personal preference will make a difference.  There’s no buttons, they’re all touch sensitive thing that’ll vibrate to confirm you’ve hit a button (but not necessarily the one you were after).  The steering wheel felt a little small, but not too much so.  The central consol feels like it’s huge but can be moved, which means you can put it where it makes most sense to you and be done with it.

               

              Those electrically adjustable seats are also heated, the only one I’ve been in so far that doesn’t cost more to do so.  On the subject of options, the boot is electric already, not only that but  hands free!!! Wave a foot in the right place when you’ve the keys in your pocket and the boot opens.  Magic!  Well, an expensive extra.

               

              So, as expected the Ariya is well worth the extra AP, if you have it, as it’s by far the better, newest and most equipped of the three.  If distance is everything, the ID5 has the most range and quite a few nice things included but feels rather last decade in comparison.  The Skoda would be out of the picture entirely except, if you add that £2,700 pack, you get almost everything the Nissan offers but with a little more range and buttons for heating controls.  It’s a little (very) thing but it can make all the difference, if you don’t want all this haptic vibrate when you click some plastic hoping it was the button you were aiming for type control, you need either a permanent passenger who will do that for you, or the Skoda.  Also, Adding that pack to the Skoda brings it slightly above the Ariya but only £405, which when you’re already at 8 grand isn’t much.

               

              Hmm, decisions, decisions.  Final verdict? Nah, not for me to conclude yet.  I’d need to drive them, or at least some of them, then see quite where we end up.

              I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
              I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

              Mark

              MFillingham
              Participant

                Given there’s a thread which includes adding £4k+ of options to a Skoda, I can’t see this being at all true.  As said above, it’s in their interests, especially for those cars that are quite basic as standard, that these additional packs will add much value at the end of the lease, with no extra outlay from Motability, I can’t see why they’d not encourage you to do whatever was on the list.

                 

                There is a difference between options from factory and aftermarket upgrades though, they are definitely anti after market upgrades as often they’ll detract from value or could cause damage within the lease period.

                I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                Mark

                in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #205385
                MFillingham
                Participant

                  I have been interested to read peoples experience of ranges, 170 miles in an Enyaq on the motorway, the comments on the Soul above, the ID.3 comments detailing ranges of 220-280 typically with a WLTP of 336 and so on. Then I contrast with my experiences, up to 360 in the summer/autumn and the lowest. around 250 on a cold wet winters day on the motorway. Since the cold snap ended I am achieving around 4.7-4.8 which is over 300 miles per charge. This is based on a southern climate, perhaps driving style has something to do with it also, however, like ICE cars, certain cars perform better than the WLTP and others far worse.

                   

                  Like all cars, you get what your driving deserves.  If you drive conservatively, take the utmost care and use regen to stop the car, even over longer distances, accelerate gradually and avoid the usual red flags for consumption, you’ll get further, bored but further.  However, if you hoon around like a teenager trying to be a rally star with lights, heating, stereo and everything else on full chat, you’ll get half the distance in a  quarter of the time with a grin from ear to ear until you pay for the top up.

                   

                  More realistic, if you’re at a constant speed, 70 isn’t a great idea, 65 saves you quite a bit and 60 some more.  If you’re already reading the road ahead you can lift off and let regen bring you to a better speed before having to brake.  Around town, I find that when there’s a lot of pedestrians around, I’m barely getting to 20 before twitching at people likely to be crossing without looking.  Too many people don’t understand that the funny whining noise is 2 tonnes of metal coming up behind you until they step out, see you out of the corner of their eye or, worse, jump feet as a horn goes off.   With the laws going the way they are, you’d have to prove you did everything possible to avoid taking out the idiot, even if it was obviously their fault, so defensive (slow) driving in and around pedestrian heavy areas is a necessity.

                   

                  All in all, if you drive at 60-65 on a run, don’t accelerate like it’s a race (too often) and allow the regen to do most of the slowing for you, you’ll get the best your car can give.

                  I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                  I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                  Mark

                  MFillingham
                  Participant

                    I’m not entirely convinced. There will be a reduction in demand, the country is in recession so most people won’t be looking to invest in high value assets unless they are super confident they have job security.  Companies, likewise, will delay fleet updates unless there’s a great deal to be made as costs are controlled.

                     

                     

                    I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                    I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                    Mark

                    in reply to: Skoda Enyaq #205203
                    MFillingham
                    Participant

                      I visited my local dealership today, which has both Skoda and VW shops within even my walking distance.  The skoda is very comfortable to sit in and easy to get in, although I had to have the seat all the way back (although that saves the needs for power seats if it’s jammed as far back as it goes).  The boot is vast, it’s a proper estate car on stilts but the electric works does reduce the depth of that boot. Back seats are plentiful, I could sit in the rear seat behind the front seat I jammed back with ease, although my knee would complain if I had to sit like that for long (which it would in any car).

                      I sat in a Suite design, which is the one the dealer thinks is going to be most likely to get heated seats into without spending a fortune.

                       

                      The salesman was hugely helpful, and I mean HUGELY!!!  He was instantly onto the fact that heated seats would be essential for anyone with a back issue and understood the reasoning behind powered seats for disabled customers, probably more so than Motability.  He also sits on the mindset that Motability customers are gold, if they’re treated right, they do tend to very easily become either brand or dealership loyal and are good for decades of return business.  Unlike many, he was very happy to discuss everything and anything I wanted regardless of how far in advance I was looking, afterall, it’ll be months before orders become cars.  On the subject of which, the Enyaq is now advertised with a 12 week availability as Skoda have prioritised them, that also explains why they’re on scheme now.

                      Everything I poked, prodded, switched or played with did what I’d expect in around the time/style you’d want.  The infotainment wasn’t overly laggy, despite what every review said, although coming from a Chinese car, that might just be a comparison to the awful systems in the Mk1 ZS.

                       

                      The ID5 was incredibly comfortable, although they only had the superior GTX available to sit in as the Style was being used by staff who weren’t in today.  They’re more than happy for me to pop in and see if it makes a huge difference at any time.  Systems were equally competent but plastics felt cheaper.  Seats were heated as standard in the ID5, although adjustment can’t be electronic without choosing a higher model that isn’t on scheme.

                       

                      The GTX has the Heads Up Display and uprated infotainment, which meant the drivers screen was on the stalk for the wheel and adjusted with the wheel, so you’ll always be looking through the wheel at it.  However, you get that reflection on screen so can see the information you really need without looking away from the road.

                       

                      It’s really not helped me much, the ID5 goes further (according to the salesman their demonstrators are getting 280/290 in summer, 220/240 now, despite all test drives being less than economical.  The Enyaq (also according to the salesman) was getting 230 from the 60 (which is on scheme) and much less (190ish) in winter but the optional heat pump would help with that. Which is another problem, that’s a grand for something that is standard on the Nissan.

                      Having sat in both, there’s £1,350 difference between the two with another £1,000 to get to the Ariya.  That means if I can get the £2,700 pack that includes heated seats plus wireless charging, keyless entry (but not handsfree boot) Adaptive cruise control, tri-zone climate control, heated steering wheel with regen paddles and USB C charging ports for the rear.

                       

                      That puts the upgraded Enyaq closer in specification to the Ariya but sitting in the Nissan will tell if that’s enough.

                      according to vw uk there are a few of teh id5’s in stock too in the uk, just finding a dealer that will let one go.

                      There are but, as the salesman said, the likelihood of the dealership letting one go isn’t great.  Likely wait is 6-12 months.

                       

                      So, all I’ve achieved from that is that the ID5 feels much cheaper, although the pricetag is impacting my expectation somewhat.  It’s also the case that the extra promised range is actually quite minimal, 50 miles further for that 15kWh.  That will only really tell on a journey and, to be brutally truthful, both are further on a journey than my bladder reaches, so I’d be stopping for a 20 minute boost after around 100 miles anyway.

                       

                      I’m not sure when I’ll get to the Nissan dealership, where I’ll have a look at the QQ and Ariya side by side and will compare the latter with today’s two. I’ll report back then.

                      I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                      I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                      Mark

                      in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #205072
                      MFillingham
                      Participant

                        There’s one thing that I’m in a quandary about PHEV’s though and perhaps you can answer it for me? As I understand it, PHEV’s are primarily designed to be driven in the mode where the car automatically switches between petrol and electric. That way the engine and the battery work together to give the stated bhp. If the power split is say 160bhp petrol plus 80bhp electric (giving 240bhp combined) if you use the electric only mode you are driving a very heavy car with just an 80bhp engine. I can see that making sense if you live in a very built up area and most journey are slow and stop-start, but we are semi-rural and are on clear 40-60 mph roads within minutes. We are also a few miles from a motorway that we use frequently. I’m concerned that full EV mode won’t be as sensible for us given how we use our car (I don’t fancy driving a heavy 80bhp car for all our shorter journeys) and therefore would most likely want to utilise the petrol engine and battery together most of the time. What I don’t understand is if you use the car like that, what would be the petrol mpg equivalent when you deduct from the mpg shown in the car the daily recharging cost?

                         

                        As with everything each car is made slightly differently.  I had one before going fully EV and that worked best if I took control of what was powering the wheels.  Anything over 40mph I had the engine do the work, anything below and it was electric.  Also, around town I’d go electric for as far as possible, just because that’s the most relaxing and efficient way to do it.  For long journeys, I’d stick with petrol all the way, saving electric until I’d left the last main/high speed road. Once driving around the destination town, the electric would kick in and, at the point where I needed it most, the relaxing drive would be available.

                         

                        Others only really have limited ability to decide which power was doing what and some used the electric to boost the petrol which was helpful getting around lorries going uphill but not so much when you get where you’re going to a flat(ish) battery.

                        I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                        I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                        Mark

                        in reply to: January 2023 Price Lists #205062
                        MFillingham
                        Participant

                          Was in getting a service today. While waiting I had a look at a Tucson and they oddly had a Kia Sportage on the showroom too. Sportage was I think a higher model and have to say looked better inside by a fair degree. Both were fairly big cars compared to the konas. Looking at them beside konas they looked huge. I love the grill on the Tucson tho. edit. it was the ‘GT-Line S’ 1.6 T-GDI 226bhp 6-speed auto HEV. 39k

                           

                          They are beasts.

                           

                          The Sportage too a lot of design from the futuristic EV6 which means it’s taken cabin design up another step.  I’m not sure quite why but cabin design went nearly nowhere in 30 year, stepped up a bit over the next 10 then recently has gone into high gear.  A 5 year old car looks fully antique in comparison, the wrong 2 year old car and it’ll feel outdated too.  My ZS (Mk1) was updated for the new model and instantly seemed old but compared to the newest most modern cars it’s positively ancient.

                           

                          That’s also something of  a concern, the cars I’m looking at on scheme aren’t exactly old spec but are beginning to look it, especially in comparison to some of the newest.  Compare a Ford to the latest Nissans, or even the ID5 to the Ariya and there’s a step in what feels like design eras.

                          I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                          I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                          Mark

                          in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204955
                          MFillingham
                          Participant

                            (who show just a little bias)

                            Never ??? On a serious note are you having a wall charger fitted when you eventually get you new ID3? Reason I’m asking is if the NG need to do any minor works, its worth asking/begging for a 3phase supply as it will be free and your house will be future proofed. By that I mean you can have a 7-22Kw charger at a later date, especially given many EV’s are now starting to come with 22Kw onboard chargers:-) I use to fit charge points before I became ill, but I never ever use to feel jealous – honest ???

                             

                            ID3?  When am I getting one of them?  I’m still very far down the unhelpful tunnel of listing benefits/features of available models, then comes shortlisting, test driving and finally a decision I can be happy with.  Last car was bought in lockdown based on looking from the outside, video reviews and several forums/groups recommendations.  End result wasn’t a bad one but could have been better.

                             

                            I will enquire about a 7kw wall charger but don’t need 3 phase, it’s technically not my home, so will have to settle for what the landlord allows/requires.

                            I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                            I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                            Mark

                            in reply to: Fifth Gear Recharged (EV’s) Back Tonight #204956
                            MFillingham
                            Participant

                              Thanks for the heads up, I’ll record it.

                              I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                              I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                              Mark

                              in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204942
                              MFillingham
                              Participant

                                I currently have a mhev and I guess some are different to others, mein charges up when braking or coasting and then gives a boost when needed like when you start going uphill, it also powers the car via the 48v when it enters stop / start as opposed to the 12v and starts it back up instantly. I would of went for the new FHEV but it has an ags gearbox and isn’t really an auto and is alot slower although it can do a liitle mileage in just ev mode but not much, but it wasn’t for me because of the gearbox. So i’d say they all help a little to reduce the mpg and co2, but for me it’s the free extra power when needed that it gives the 1.4lt that really helps. I had a golf and when in eco mode it would coast but had no regen and so no boost. I am pretty impressed after 6 months of the mild hybrid and I don’t drive really economically and use adatptive cruise alot on longer journeys and getting just over 40 mpg combined. I could get better if i actually drove it not on the acc, but it helps me so much. I wouldn’t have a car without it. Plus i guess alot of my daily driving is cold driving, so you also don’t get such great mpg as the engine isn’t at optimum temp.

                                That’s interesting to hear.  Most of what I know about these cars is manufacturer data and expereiences from theose on EV groups (who show just a little bias).

                                How would that work also on a bev, if you have no charging at home and so the battery is cold most of the time and as you cannot charge at home. Is it worth preconditioning before you leave, what effect would that have not doing so and just jumping in and driving to school and back in the morning and afternoon. The Nissan’s E-power is a very intresting one sounds similar to the toyota hybrids which have some amazing mpg although it powers the ev mode only. My guess is though, Nissan always get a lower mpg than they say alot lower and was the downside to the QQ i had on the scheme, although the ev driving the car might be the answer to that issue and the rear seat belts being very short.

                                All home charging I do is via a 3 pin plug.  That means any preconditioning is from battery power and not the external power supply.  I can impact range if you’re silly with it (I’ve seen people set their precon to stupidly hot over an extended period of time) but warm enough to clear the windows plus about 10 minutes worth only really cost me a few miles.  The current car doesn’t have precon at all (poor decision, I know) but can go from cold to clear within 5 minutes even in the recent cold snap (only -3 down here though) that cost me 5 miles but had heat to max, blowers to max, both front seats heating – it was snug to get into.

                                I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                Mark

                                in reply to: qashqai tekna #204938
                                MFillingham
                                Participant

                                  Rear heated  seats are Tekna+ which isn’t on scheme.  Front heated seats are Tekna.  All seats are fake leather and cloth combination.

                                  I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                  I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                  Mark

                                  in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204929
                                  MFillingham
                                  Participant

                                    When we talk about infrastructure it seems to always be referring to charging station and no consideration for the generating infrastructure. Can you imagine were we would be right now if all the cars on the road today were EV’s. At the moment its still a tiny percentage and there talking about blackouts if the weather gets cold. We have governments in the west that are clueless on just about everything but hope they got some sort of plan for upping the generation game in 7 years time or they really are about to break the nuclear fusion problem soon.

                                     

                                    Blackouts and EVs are unrelated.  The black out warnings are because some idiot believed that buying power and oil from one unfriendly country was wise.  Once that was stopped, some countries have found their ability to supply electricity so badly impacted they can’t cope, while others have really struggled.  ALL have invested dramatically less than necessary in building their own generation network, whether that’s nuclear, coal, renewable or a combination of all or some of the above, they’ve done nothing.  Now, that has come back to bite us, the public on the butt with price increases caused by supply pricing and no option to go elsewhere.  Even now, the powerstations being built are on a deal that wouldn’t see us any better off.  Guaranteed future electricity prices for a French company?  Who thought that wise?

                                     

                                     

                                    I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                    I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                    Mark

                                    in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204922
                                    MFillingham
                                    Participant

                                      thats the big issue with electrics still at the moment, the infrastructure just isnt there if you cant charge at home. i would have changed to electric by now if i could get a home charger but its impossible. my lifestyle will suit as i mainly do short 20 mile max journies and maybe once a year do a longer journey on holiday. if i had decent public charging near me i would jump now, but there are 2 chargers within 6 miles of me and thats it listed on zap map. i think a couple of supermarkets have chargers but no idea of the cost. so ive gone for nissans hybrid juke this time and i reckon a lot of my journies will be cheaper and mpg higher.

                                       

                                      That sums it up nicely.  Cities are getting chargers in lamp posts, chargers in car parks and other destination type (slow) charging at relatively reasonable costs.  However, if all you can do is rapid charging, the cost alone is prohibitive.  I have know some people come to arrangements with neighbours, charging when you do those sorts of milages can be weekly, so for £10 per month, you charge on their drive overnight.  That requires having a suitable person close enough (or willing to drive you home) who is willing to give up their drive for one night a week.

                                       

                                      Otherwise, Tesco is around 28p per kW, Lidl rapids are 40p, not sure what their slower chargers are.  Some retail parks still have free charging but you do need to be shopping there and it’s only limited parking.

                                      However, yes, owning an electric car is dependent upon you being able to charge at your convenience, which may be at work…  Without that opportunity, it needs a convenient charger near to  or on route to/from home which is at the right price.  If you can’t meet that criteria, the next best option would be petrol.  I’m not convinced that mild hybrids actually bring anything to the table.  You lose efficiency while charging for a couple of miles at most of pure EV, in some cases, it’s only a few hundred metres and you’re lumbered carrying around all that extra stuff to enable charging and use.

                                      A plug in Hybrid (of which there really aren’t many on scheme) does give you some range but still gives you that charging problem.

                                       

                                      So, without home charging I’d be in a petrol car, with it, I’d be choosing between full BEV or PHEV.

                                       

                                      The only exception is Nissan’s E-power.  That gives you all the fun of driving electric plus the efficiency of an electric motor but the convenience of  carrying your own generator.  The only thing is fuel consumption, until we get reliable information about real world examples, this could turn a great idea either into an expensive mistake or absolute brilliance.

                                      I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                      I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                      Mark

                                      MFillingham
                                      Participant

                                        @mfillingham Good points and very constructive, What form of competion it would be, I don’t exactly know but something needs to be done to stop the monolopy they have and the advantages others do not. It could differ, after all how many leasing companies are there around, more than one. Or fleet and hire companies and they all negotiate with manufactures / dealers separately as even one could do youself. Or even some form of tendering for a fixed term contract, like how the lottery is run, there maybe other solutions and models than what mbo currently run.m Pretty much it’s being run like that now only difference is there’s no jackpot payouts, except to those running the scheme. What I don’t understand from some is why you cannot have a discusssion on the big issues about the scheme and this is one of them and whay can some not be outraged by it? Well imo it’s more a matter of being disgusted and outraged for many, over the huge profits and the how they using the funds.

                                         

                                        Firstly, thanks I do try and be constructive.

                                         

                                        It’s tough.  Leasing a car is easy, you buy it then lease it for a while then sell it.  Your purchasing power gives you the necessary discounts.  For example if you were to approach Nissan UK with an order for 50 QashQai e-Power Tekna +s they’d happily discount them for you.  Motability don’t seem to negotiate like that, from the little I see, it seems they offer a certain group of vehicles at a discounted rate but without committing to a set number of units.

                                        Do you set up a number of charitable companies (level playingfield) enabled in the same legislation as Motability, for the provision of vehicles for disabled people of the UK?  Then ask them to negotiate with the dealers on the basis that the maximum monthly allowance they get will be 4.333 weeks worth of Higher Rate Mobility allowance or it’s equivalent, anything above that needs to be funded either through resale at the end of lease or Advanced Payments from the customer (us).  Then we see who gets the better end of the stick?

                                         

                                        What is obvious is that currently, whatever the existing board decide to do, nobody has the inclination to hold them to account.  Even this government wouldn’t be too bothered if the Telegraph went into meltdown over the profits and profiteering from disability benefits after all the press they’ve survived over the last few years.

                                        I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                        I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                        Mark

                                        in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204906
                                        MFillingham
                                        Participant

                                          The thing is, with the range of a petrol / diesel car you wouldn’t need to be re-fueling at a motorway service station. When I had my EV it was costing my company around £24 to fully charge it on the motorway and I was getting a max of 180 miles for that sometimes 130 miles. Prices have increased massively since then.

                                           

                                          August 21 we did a 400 mile round trip plus whatever mileage we put on around our destination.  This was done charging at Exeter (there and back), Wincanton Morrisons (both ways) and Lidl on the way back.  The total cost for all those miles was less than £20.   Late last year I had to put a boost charge into the car at the local McDonalds, it was about 20 minutes worth and cost £21 for just over 100 miles extra.  If that was my only options for charging, I’d be driving a petrol right now, for sure.

                                          I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                          I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                          Mark

                                          MFillingham
                                          Participant

                                            I am happy with the scheme. I am unhappy with the injustice of taxpayer-provided funds intended to benefit people qualifying for PIP being misspent by the charity set up to help disabled people, without them being held accountable.

                                            absolutely and they should and have some competion.

                                             

                                            How does competition help?

                                             

                                            Currently one company negotiates with each manufacturer.  That company then provides what cars it can at the price it negotiates.  If there’s two, do they then negotiate exclusive deals with each manufacturer?  So Nissan is Motability and KIA with MobilityUK (for example) Stellantis with Motability, Hyundai MobilityUK, MG, Motability, etc.  Does that mean that you need acceptance from both before hunting out your car?  What if you get accepted from one but not the other just to find the most suitable car you can’t get because it’s the wrong company?  What about those disabled people who struggle to get paperwork completed because they have mental capacity difficulties?  They’d have to do everything twice?  What about dealerships who have multiple brands, would they have different people helping each?  Would they support the extra paperwork?

                                             

                                            Motability need to be accountable, agree 100%.  Motability need to be kept on their toes, again agree 100%.  I’m just not convinced that putting other players in the space will make our lives better but I’m more than happy to be proved wrong.

                                            I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                            I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                            Mark

                                            in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204901
                                            MFillingham
                                            Participant

                                              £1.50 a litre round here. Motorway driving at least 45mpg. So 15p a mile.

                                               

                                              Is that £1.50 at motorway prices though?  (genuine question, I like comparing apples with apples, it’s easier).

                                              However, that does, just, show EVs to be cheaper (skin of teeth here).

                                               

                                              Honest reality is that if you were to buy an EV run it completely on public, rapid chargers you would pay much more over 3 years than an equivalent petrol car.  That’s down to electricity prices being ridiculous right now and public charging still getting clobbered full VAT.  Prices have jumped from 28p per litre (on crappy unreliable chargers) to 65p or even more but the network is, mainly, less unreliable for that investment.  I’ve seen charges nearing £1 per kWh, which is insane.  However, I’ve also seen motorway service stations in remote areas charging 10% more than others.

                                               

                                              I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                              I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                              Mark

                                              in reply to: More daft questions ! #204896
                                              MFillingham
                                              Participant

                                                Road tax is renewed by you.  You will get your renewal notice and will be able to take that to a post office and it’ll be stamped off as a disability exempt car.  I don’t know if it can be done online, I only have experience of my parents doing that.

                                                 

                                                Breakdown, you get a number to call, they’ll have all your details from Motability, same with insurance.  Your dealership will let you know when servicing is due and will book it in with you.  They’ll also provide a courtesy car while they have yours.

                                                I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                                I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                                Mark

                                                in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204890
                                                MFillingham
                                                Participant

                                                  Using motorway services to charge an EV will cost far more than running either a petrol or diesel car.

                                                   

                                                  Evidence?

                                                   

                                                  Gridserve who operate a large number of Motorway service stations are quoted on the mapping services at 65p per kWh.  My car gets AT LEAST 4 miles per kWh, so 4 miles per 65p or just over 16p per mile public charged.  There are cars that will return 5 or 6 miles per kWh, which reduces that further.  That’s the expensive options.

                                                   

                                                  It’s been a long time since I last drove a petrol engined car so I’ve no idea what the realistic mpg looks like at £180odd per litre.

                                                  I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                                  I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                                  Mark

                                                  MFillingham
                                                  Participant

                                                    I just don’t understand the problem and the obsession with Motability, no one is holding a gun to your head, you are free chose how to use your allowance, the majority of us are quite happy with the scheme.

                                                    The problem isn’t the scheme.  However, the perception when disabled people are required to pay increasing APs for business reasons beyond Motability’s control but the profits hit £1 BILLION and the boss gets huge bonuses.  That money comes from the pockets of the disabled people and the taxpayer.  Regardless of whether I was on scheme or not I’d be outraged at £1 billion being taken out of the economy, especially paid for out of the government budgets, at the same time as public services are facing strike action for pay.  That profit margin would go a long way to aiding problems that the current government can’t (or won’t) find the money to solve.  To put it in full context the NHS was given and addition £500Million or HALF A BILLION to solve the problems it’s facing.  If payments to Motability were reduced, or profits returned to public coffers, that payment could have been twice as much.

                                                     

                                                    Any private company is perfectly entitled to make a profit, however, when they take money from the public purse, the public have a right to know that money is well spent and profits are not excessive.  £1Bn is excessive, it’s getting on for Microsoft or Amazon type amounts, not a single country’s disability mobility company’s level of acceptable profit.

                                                     

                                                    I think that the scheme does a brilliant job, provides reliable transportation to people who would have had a cheap, unreliable and potentially hazardous vehicle with the option to have something suitable that is fully maintained for them.  That’s fantastic.  What’s less so, and the reason behind this post, is people making large amounts of money from this organisation.

                                                    I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                                    I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                                    Mark

                                                    in reply to: Electric Cars. Stick or twist next time #204880
                                                    MFillingham
                                                    Participant

                                                      We stay around the Penzance / St Ives area, there’s a rapid charger at the new St Erth train station / interchange that’s been faulty for months. A town the size of Penzance only seems to have 7 kw supermarket chargers. Can you imagine what it’s like in August. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a green at heart, I really want to go electric. But it needs to be practical.

                                                       

                                                      If it was me, I’d charge at Cornwall service on the way in, then if charging where your staying isn’t an option, use the supermarket chargers to boost that when you can.  As long as you have enough to get back to (just beyond) Indian Queens on the way out, you’re sorted.  Charge again at Cornwall Services and then again on the motorway.  It’s a bit of a pain but resolves a lot of the worry.  Also note some attractions are having/have chargers in place so you can visit, say, the Eden Project for a good few hours and top up whilst there.

                                                      I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                                      I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                                      Mark

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