Intranicity

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  • in reply to: Home Charger Cost of Install ? #180863
    Intranicity
    Participant

    +1 for Hypervolt

    Mine cost me £599 inc the £350 grant plus an extra £50 discount (NHS, Military and BLUE BADGE HOLDERS)

    excellent customer service, uk made and based, and the Facebook group has the company CEO on there daily answering questions

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Thread for EV mpg info. #180318
    Intranicity
    Participant

    I’m just coming up to 25k now in the Kona, it’s a great car, and has to be about the best economy out there.

    Moved home now, so not reliant on public charging anymore either

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Electric vehicle myth busting: a new series from me. #175274
    Intranicity
    Participant

    I’ve ordered a kona premium but I was wondering how long you’ve had yours and what your thoughts are about it?

    I picked up mine last Easter, so coming on 10 months, done nearly 22k miles now and love it, one of the best cars I’ve ever had, range has dropped a bit now it’s winter, but still around 250 miles on a full charge and love getting into a defrosted warm car in the morning.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Electric vehicle myth busting: a new series from me. #175271
    Intranicity
    Participant

    when i put heater on my predicted range drops by 40/ 50 miles instantly, but goes back up when you switch it off again, so i dont think using it is particularly as wasteful as with ice vehicles. electric seat and steering wheel dont affect range at all oddly.

    It’s the way the Kona and most other EV’s work, most of the electrical systems like radio, lights, heated seat run off the 12V battery, only the A/C runs off the main traction battery.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: KONA EV 64KW EFFICIENCY #169027
    Intranicity
    Participant

    I have done 18k miles, but was driving really carefully, 65mph on the motorways and 55 on most A roads, I’ve been averaging 4.9 miles/kW

    That will almost certainly change now though as just moved to a house and now have a home charger, so the economy is less of an issue, It’s not hard to get 300mile plus range in the Kona, I’m really enjoying the switch and the savings.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Hyundai Kona EV Two long trips on one week #168277
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Chargers being expensive are relative to what you’re used to paying…  Compared to 5p kW, they are expensive, compared to Petrol/Diesel they are still cheap.

    The Kona will only charge at a maximum of 77kW, it’s probably the only downside of the car, that said, it still only ends up being slightly slower than most of the comparable cars, and has the bonus of generally having a better range.

    Motorways are getting much better now, and to be honest, are some of the cheapest destination chargers out there at 35p kW,  in the end, for occasional use, even the most expensive chargers (Currently Ionity 69p kW) are still cheaper than conventional fuels. they just come as a shock, you soon forget about paying £80 to fill a tank with diesel!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Hyundai Kona Electric Best Charging Sites or Services #166267
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Hi Vaun,

    In the end it’s an almost impossible question to answer…

    For me it’s Ionity, but only because there is a bank of 4 chargers 8 miles from where I live, I pay a subscription charge of £11.25 a month on the Charge MyHyundai card and that brings the cost down to 25p kW, so for me it’s perfect.

    After that, it’s a case of doing a bit of research on your journey, there are quite often free chargers on route, if so i’ll use them.

    Motorways are much improved lately and are currently great value at 30p kW, I also use BP Pulse as I get the free subscription, the 50kW comes in at 23p kW and are generally OK.

    I’ve used Instavolt, Geniepoint and a few others, most seem to be charging around 40-45p kW, so getting expensive, but still cheaper than diesel, I worked out that as long as it’s less than 51p kW, I’m saving money in an EV

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Anyone with the Kona EV Ultimate Help me out? #166030
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Glad you’re relying on videos, rather than listening to owners, maybe the uk model has different specs, but it’s certainly not hard like in that video. I’d stick with the ID3 and not even bother with the Kona, you deserve it!!!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Anyone with the Kona EV Ultimate Help me out? #166023
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Rene, I had to go in the car to check, but the armrests in the Kona are padded not hard plastic.

    I actually am fine with hard plastics, as long as they’re decently textured and not somewhere where i constantly touch – which is sadly the case in the Kona (the “elbow rest” in the door).

    That’s hard plastic.

    well my definition of hard plastic is it’s solid. I actually have a Kona, and the bit you’re pointing to is definitely soft, but maybe you have some other definition of what hard and soft is?

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Anyone with the Kona EV Ultimate Help me out? #166013
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Rene, I had to go in the car to check, but the armrests in the Kona are padded not hard plastic.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Electric, Petrol or Extend #165997
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Yes, the HUD can be adjusted as you’ve now found, you can raise and lower, as well as tilt and change the size of the display.

    Big issue is severe lack of knowledge at dealerships sadly.

    I have a spinal cord injury, and find the seats really comfortable, each to their own I guess, I’m loving the Kona and it eats the miles and incredibly well spec’d, but if you aren’t sure, then I’d wait it out, next 12 months should see plenty of new EV’s on the scheme, Kia have even eventually added the e-Niro!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Anyone with the Kona EV Ultimate Help me out? #165996
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Electric cars, imho, need rear wheel drive/all wheel drive. Preferably rear wheel drive – no torque steer (zero), usually better turning radius, and more traction. The ID3 goes like a horse stung by a bee in sport mode.

    Rene, you really should drive the Kona before making guess, as you found, the ID3 has already been a much better car than you expected.

    The Kona now is fitted with decent tires, most videos are on horrible Nexans, now they fit Michelin tires, wheel spin is much reduced, but you can get it i’ll admit.

    The handling though for  front wheel drive is really good, and the performance, well I’d happily watch you in the rear view mirror at the traffic lights if you were in the ID3.  Both great cars, and both with things that could be improved, but the Kona is seriously hard to beat on the scheme as everything is standard.

    Looking forward to hearing your views on the Kona once you’ve actually driven it.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Who’s to blame for the AP increase. #165731
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Brydo, that is one hell of a kick in the teeth for Trades Unions don’t you think? Ever since day 1 , they have fought for better wages and better working conditions for workers, whether they be blue or white collar, and yet when a company or enterprise provides good salaries, pensions, working conditions some people complain that it is too much? Wow!!! Would you work in a dump, and be satisfied with lower wages than those working in the next building, of course not, so why should Motability pay less and provide lesser working conditions. In 2017, the net result of the cost of providing the scheme, after allowing for the income from PIP / DLA, Advanced Payments etc was a net profit, after tax, of £93.5m. Which, frankly for an organisation of this magnitude is not excessive! As with all such organisations, Motability Operations also build up ‘reserves’, which in layman’s terms, are accumulated and unspent profits to cover unforeseen eventualities – good business sense as well as potentially a legal requirement , The controversy occurred when it was reported that these reserves totalled £2.3bn (which to some is excessive ), which caused sensational headlines and derogatory stories about Motability, but the true message which needs to get ‘out there’, is that these reserves have been built up over many years – the previous audit was in 1996, when the reserves were £61 m. So,most reasonable people will understand that the annual surplus is not excessive. That is not to say that some of these reserves could not be spent in improving the scheme, but throwing money at providing flash cars ( in some non disabled people’s and newspaper’s eyes) may not be the best way forward?

    Totally agree, I’m surprised at Brydo’s comments!

    Another thing to remember about the pay and conditions is the old adage, you pay peanuts, you get Monkeys… I doubt you’ll find many people who ring Motability call centres that don’t have a very pleasant experience, and usually you get answers very quickly, and usually correct.  Can you say the same for any other call centre?

    I’m glad Motability are a good employer, appreciate their staff and make people want to work for them, and in the end give it’s customers a good service.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Anyone with the Kona EV Ultimate Help me out? #165730
    Intranicity
    Participant

    6 months and over 15k miles in the 64kW Kona and can’t really fault it, I do wish that it remembered some settings like auto hold etc, but that’s just part of the start up process now.

    It’s definitely the most economical EV out there, I’m averaging 5 miles/kw without trying too hard, you do have to re learn how to drive, or actually how to drive an EV, but it doesn’t take long.

    No range anxiety either, I’ll happily set off on a 400 mile drive with the battery at 65%and just charge when I need a break after a couple of hours, the Kona loves fast charging between 20 and 70%, get to 70% and off you go with well over 200 more miles range.

    I’ve driven most things in my life, from HGV’s to tanks and just about everything in between, and have to say it’s one of the most enjoyable vehicles I’ve driven, the grip is really good, the ride is smooth and the seats are both comfortable and supportive as well as hugely adjustable.  Performance is closer to 6 secs o-60, and you actually feel yourself pushed back in the seat, you can also drive it like you stole it, the paddles for regen almost work like dropping the gears down the box in a corner, and up to 80, the acceleration is impressive.

    Really hope you like your test drive, I’m sure if you can live with the size, you’ll love the car.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: How much is your BEV or PHEV saving you per month? #165234
    Intranicity
    Participant

    How much a month is dependant on how many miles you drive!

    15k miles in the Kona has cost me just under £500, around £33 for 1000 miles or £17 a tank full in the BMW.

    The BMW that would have cost me £1765 at £1.31 a litre, my charging costs are high though, mainly on commercial chargers.

    A better way to work it out is how much does it cost you to drive 1 mile.  Currently, for me it’s 3.25p, moving house soon and will be able to charge from home then, so hopefully, I will get my costs down by half.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Have You Been In A Queue For Fuel #165092
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Petrol boss blames hauliers for fuel crisis as station pumps run dry after weekend of panic buying https://inews.co.uk/news/petrol-fuel-crisis-hgv-shortage-hauliers-station-pumps-dry-panic-buying-weekend-1219782?

    i blame BO for putting out the original press release to say they had a minor problem. This just made the BBC etc jump on it and that caused the issue

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Ordered an ID.3 Max Pro #165088
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Apparently Motability will now let you have an EV without having a home charger. On a phone call to Motability the lady said we give you a card that lets you use a fast charger at discounted cost. But then went on to say the card is worth £7.50p a month. But then added the card is only for 3 months! I assumed it would be for the 3 years of the lease.

    As ever with EV’s, knowledge is poor from advisors and sales people.

    If you can’t have a home charger, you get a code to enter on BP Pulse, this gives you a 3 year subscription free. Normally around £10 a month. Not the best option but still a useful one

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: When was Kia e-niro taken off motability #165079
    Intranicity
    Participant

    The e-Niro has never been available on Motability (Sadly)

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Is going electric now worth it? #165078
    Intranicity
    Participant

    As the previous two posters have said. I pay for 60% of my car charges on commercial (exspendive) chargers.

    so far over 15k miles I’m averaging out at 3’2p a miles, my economical BMW diesel was costing me 12p a mile, if I could charge at home I’d probably be paying an average of less than 2p a mile.

    Also, electricity is going up, just as fossil fuels are

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Ordered an ID.3 Max Pro #165077
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Hi  Mark

    congratulations on ordering your new car.

    the cable show. Is a type 2 cable, but it’s important to understand the difference in cables and charging speeds.

    type 2 cables use AC power, the maximum power on AC is 22kW, but is dependant on the onboard charger and how much the car can handle. In your case 11kW, then it’s how much power a charging station can deliver, so a 7kW charger will deliver around that to your car, while a 22kW can only deliver 11kW as that’s the maximum your car can take.

    faster charging is carried out by DC chargers using a CCS cable (these are fixed to the chargers, you don’t need one), these can deliver up to 350kW, but again this is restricted to the maximum your car’s circuit can handle,in your case 125kW. Also note, you will only get close to the max charge rate for a limited time, charging usually starts slow, ramps up to the maximum the charger can deliver (or the car take) and slows rapidly towards the end.

    you will soon get used to it, but what I do is only use AC if it’s free, and DC I never charge past 80% unless I have loads of time as it becomes so slow it’s not worth it

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Q4 News and Updates #164977
    Intranicity
    Participant

    As a former Regional Bank Manager and eventually a Full Board Director, I can confirm ( from perusing large numbers of rejected applications – albeit a few years back ) not only will very many disabled people not be able to meet the income requirements for a private lease on a new vehicle (and therefore there is a distinct advantage with Motability and not having an income assessment and check carried out) but also many will not pass a credit check , which of course , is not carried out alongside a Motability application! The Motability scheme is an excellent scheme for the vast majority of the disabled , indeed, it may be the only scheme available for some, and we need to be careful not to encourage people to leave , as they may face disappointment elsewhere? Of course, some people will be able to afford vehicles outside of the scheme, and are free to do so, but they should be wary of putting ideas into others minds!

    Spot on, some people are in a fortunate position to have options, many don’t.  The scheme generally is really good value, pandemics, Daily Mail and Covid made things difficult, hopefully in a few quarters, things will start getting better.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Have You Been In A Queue For Fuel #164976
    Intranicity
    Participant

    57.95 pence per litre is fuel duty and then you pay 20% vat on top of that If you are a government short on cash then it is a very quick and easy way to increase your cash flow And we all fell for it

    There’s ill informed, conspiracy theorists and plain stupid…  Not sure where this comment fits, but in the end, all that’s happened is lots of people have filled their fuel tanks, and maybe used 4-5 days supply in a day.  Not quite sure how this increases the cash flow, especially as now lots of panickers won’t need to fill their fuel tanks for a week or two?

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    in reply to: Have You Been In A Queue For Fuel #164956
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Thought it was funny that it takes longer to fill a car up with petrol than it does to charge an EV these days

    Yes, I feel sorry for ICE owners, it’s been crazy round here, Swindon is devoid of fuel. I haven’t suffered from range anxiety since getting an EV, but I would have now if I’d got an ICE!!!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    Intranicity
    Participant

    By comparison, there’s a certain simple pleasure just squirting petrol into the tank. Sometimes fast, sometimes slow, while gazing around the garage forecourt without a care until the nozzle clicks off…

    Until you realise you put the wrong fuel in…  Sadly it still happens and leads to a very bad day…

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    Intranicity
    Participant

    Ignoring what manufacturers say (They are incredibly risk averse) and much of what they say is to cover themselves and give get out clauses, and the fact that we have these cars for 3 years on a lease and the battery warranties are usually around 8 years!

    The preserved wisdom from people who actually drive EV’s is that once a month it is good form to charge to 100% as the Battery Management Systems does lots of work in the final 10% from 90-100% charge, managing and balancing out the cells, that final 10% often takes longer than it takes to go from 20-80%.

    You also need to be aware that all batteries have buffers, so when the car shows 0% or 100% state of charge, the battery is actually nearer 5% and 95%, theses buffer zones are unusable to the car, but are there to protect from fully discharging and killing a battery.

    AC (Slow) charging is believed to be healthier for batteries, but there are plenty of people (me included) who do that vast majority of charging via DC fast chargers, and are seeing no degradation of batteries (Taxis with well over 120k miles all on DC and battery still healthy). Currently I’m getting around 340 miles on a 100% charge.

    The biggest thing personally to understand is how you car behaves to charging, and the benefits of different types of charging.  I don’t think many new EV owners (Or dealerships) understand how the cars work.  Take the Kona for instance, it has a 64kW (Usable) battery, and will charge at 11kw on AC and 77kW on DC, sounds great… But it will only charge at 77kW for a very short time and only at a specific battery state and temperature, if it’s not in the sweet spot, it will be much slower.  The same goes for chargers, you are lucky to get much more that 44kW from a 50kW charger.

    I do most of my charging on Ionity 350kW chargers and these are the average speeds I get:

    unto 25% – 53kW
    25%-53% – 77kW
    54%-57% – 71kW
    58%-73% – 58kW
    74%-77% – 36kW
    78%-90% – 24kW

    On a long journey, I will only charge the car to 73%, after that it’s quicker to continue the drive to your destination (or next charging stop) than it is to stay on the charger. Once a month I will DC charge to 90% and then go to a free AC charger and top up to 100% to manage the BMS system. I never pay for AC charging, as there are plenty of free ones at supermarkets,

    Back to the original post, the only real issue against regular charging on a granny charger is making sure that the electrics up to the socket are good, you will still be drawing 2.1kW for extended periods, and how long the granny charger will last (Unknown) but they are designed for occasional use, but I’m sure they will last for longer than the 3 year lease.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 377 total)