gothitjulie

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 25 replies - 51 through 75 (of 696 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • in reply to: Fast charger #141514
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Does anyone have any advice on whether the fast charger available with the peugeot 3008 is worth having? I have been told that its restricts the places it can be used. If you get the fast charger should you also get the wall charger? Is there any contribution towards that? Thanks in anticipation.

    To answer that question you’d need to know & understand the charge profile of the 3008s 10.8kWh battery.

    The options are the 3.3kW or the 6.6kW AC charger that sits in the car. Charge times quoted are 3h30m for the 3.3kW and 1h40m for the 6.6kW. If you are parked up at a destination such as a supermarket regularly then it’s a simple calculation of how much money you will save over the 3 years of the lease compared with the £300 extra you will pay for the 6.6kW option.

    As an example, if you plug in once a week & pull 10kWh, you will pull 1,560kWh over 3 years, at 15p per kWh average at home compared to free from a supermarket charge post, that’s £234 saving instead of £117 saving using the 3.3kW standard charger . Not worth paying the extra £300 for as you won’t recover your outlay.

    To make the difference you’d need to be charging nearly 3 times per week at a free supermarket charger for it to be worthwhile.

    The other constraints are the length of time you can use the chargers, it’s often 2 or 3 hours at supermarkets, depending on their footfall. But I can’t see an economic argument for the 6.6kW charger unless you are stopping at supermarkets most days for a meal.

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    in reply to: The ‘LitterCam’ that’s watching you #141498
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Imagine the scene where a lady drops her handkerchief for a man to pick up….

    …no doubt some jobsworth behind a screen would have hopefully found this amusing, but a computer would see it as littering & dampen a blossoming romance with a fine.

    Still, are there any ladies left in Maidstone, Kent?

     

    in reply to: Fast charger #141497
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    PHEVs are welcome on 3.6kW to 7.2kW chargers as long as they don’t simply use them as parking spaces. Last week I parked next to a PHEV & it was charging on a 7.2kW post so no problem.

    PHEVs are not so welcome on some of the rapid chargers (50kW DC CHAdeMO & CCS, plus upto a 43kW AC socket) where they use the Type 2 AC socket to draw just 3.6kW for hours whilst BEVs sit waiting their turn to get a top-up to get them home. The PHEV charges too slow, block BEVs from using the chargers to draw 50kW, & only charges enough to gain 15 miles or so of motorway range in about 3 hours.

    Now, some of the rapid chargers can support an AC connection & a DC connection at the same time, you can plug into those if you know which ones support it, but they are really meant for 22kW & 43kW Zoe charging or for emergency 7kW charging of BEVs to get them as far as the next charger when the DC circuits have failed.

    The 7kW fast chargers are usually posts in car parks (supermarkets, train stations) or wall box type chargers in some car parks, they are cheap & often free to use. And then there are the advertising post 7kW chargers that Tesco have next to a normal 7kW post.

    Rapid chargers (50kW DC and faster) are large, like petrol pumps or larger, they have expensive transformers inside & thick tethered charging leads that are possibly water cooled.

    You will see these around quite a bit, ABBs Terra charger, note they have a tethered 7kW AC lead rather than a socket.

    And these Ionity 350kW chargers don’t have an AC socket (or CHAdeMo DC socket) (yes, that’s my car on that Ionity charger, suckling at up to 100kW)

     

    in reply to: 7 seater, 300 mile large BEV, SUV exists! #141468
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Xpeng are probably right about range, but we are facing a major problem in the UK with the lack of rapid chargers when everyone decides to go on a driving holiday at the same time.

    The sooner the Gov’t kicks Ecotricity out of motorway service stations the better, else those service stations will be bankrupt in 10 years as they can’t charge just one EV at a time as is the current average. The only alternative to the charging problem is Tesla superchargers at the moment.

    Meanwhile there are a lot of rapid chargers springing up just off the motorways, e.g. J27 M6 8 new ultra rapids, but they’re awaiting connection by the DNO who just plod along at a snail’s pace in the UK. This is the reason that BP ultra rapids at Reading services on the M4 sit idle, it’s the same all over the country.

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    in reply to: 7 seater, 300 mile large BEV, SUV exists! #141467
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Yes indeed, which is why I’m considering a Tesla as my next car & just accept that I’ll be better off buying it outright & that by the time the warranty on the battery & drivetrain ends there will be plenty of Tesla repairers around. Aim would be to keep the car until it is well & truly dead or I am.

    Battery deg on Bjorn’s “Millenium Falcon” 2013 Tesla Model S P85 is around 13% with that battery having done around 260k km (it had a new battery early on under warranty & the car is over 350k km), so not bad, & that battery has done loads of rapid charging.

     

     

    in reply to: 7 seater, 300 mile large BEV, SUV exists! #141455
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    599,900 NOK  (€58,181/$70,077)

    It’ll be well over any Motability caps

    The batter is lithium-iron-phosphate, the same as all the 80 cells I have laying around here waiting for an application (next wheelchair project or powerwall) and they are much safer than even a lead acid battery.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    in reply to: Do you have an exercise routine? #141240
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Used to swim, lots, & since the pools closed I’ve lost muscle tone.

    Using a manual wheelchair to exercise here is impossible because it’s simply too hilly, & until we’re allowed to travel to exercise again there is no exercise. Only walking, running & cycling allowed, & I can’t do any of those.

     

     

    in reply to: On a drive to eat healthier. #141189
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The problem with prawns is they are high in salt, so if you do venture down the decadence of prawns for breakfast remember you’ll use up half your salt intake for the day before it gets started.

    The good thing about prawns is they are very low in fats & carbs of course, hence the snowflake generation came up with the idea of prawn avocado to counter the health benefits, although oleic acid (the fat in avocados & olive oil) probably isn’t much of a worry in anything but the calorie counting department.

    And with that I’m off out to sneak up on a pheasant or grouse in the EV to bag my dinner……

    Knowing my luck it’ll be roadkill badger again.

     

    in reply to: Car numbers on the Motability Scheme today #141183
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The 3008 PHEVs charge at 3.6kW maximum so don’t plug them into a rapid charger as your car may be damaged when you return. Stick with home charging & AC charge posts.

    @gothitjulie One can add a 7.4kW Monophase on board charger for £300. Would this enable faster charging?

    It’ll allow for 2.5 hour charging instead of 5 hours, so OK on a 7kW AC public charge post or lamppost. Compare this to a BEV charging at 100kW on a DC rapid (and some rapids with an AC outlet don’t let a DC charge at the same time, hence you’d be unpopular hogging a charger for 2.5 hours for 36 miles of range when a BEV would pull enough for 100 miles in 20 minutes & be long gone). Luckily the newer CCS ultra rapid chargers don’t have a type 2 socket, and other rapid chargers often have a minimum vend price (£1.80) and a 90 minute overstay policy (£10 per 90 minutes) (45 minutes in some places and £10 per hour) to stop PHEVs hogging the chargers.

    You’ll often see PHEVs hogging 7kW AC posts in car parks, not even plugged in, just using the space for parking & blocking everyone else, and they have usually been keyed a few times in busier car parks.

     

    in reply to: Game changer all-electric Hyundai Ioniq 5 #141181
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    A Nissan Leaf has a 600 pound saving a year vs a Note diesel over 10k miles. You would need to keep your electric car an awfully long time for you to say you actually saving money.

    You’re right of course, when I worked up the figures of my e-2008 against the fossil 2008, I’d save £2,100 on fuel cost vs electric cost (allowing 15p kWh although I usually charge cheaper), so the e-2008 had to be under £2,100 cheaper than the fossil & at the time the difference was £1,800.

    However, I’m doing way more miles in the EV than I did in my previous fossil because of that fuel price difference & don’t worry about popping down the coast for the afternoon (not during lockdown), or popping over to my sister’s for a chat & a meal (allowed during lockdown using a “bubble” but I haven’t).

    So, if an EV works out cheaper on Motability than the fossil, AND you’re not doing very long journeys all the time, AND you can charge at home, you might as well go for the EV. Long journeys are possible with an EV, you just have to plan for all the charging stops and it takes a while to learn which chargers & why (Instavolt with more than 1 charger at the site is most reliable, then any other multiple charger site except Ecotricty where they will all be out of service).

    As for the Leaf 40, most new rapid chargers at CCS so no use as the car uses CHAdeMO. (CCS has become the European standard for rapid chargers and CHAdeMO isn’t always supported by new rapid installations (Ionity are CCS only)).

     

     

    in reply to: Car numbers on the Motability Scheme today #141177
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Let’s hope that things continue to improve. Especially since the bhp limit seems to be on the change, at least for PHEVs: 3008 with 300bhp giving a 0-60 of 5.8 sec. Forgive me for being pessimistic but I wonder how long that will stay on scheme!

    At a list price of close on £45k it’s more expensive than a Tesla Model 3 at £42.5k!

    The difference of course is that Motability will be given a very large discount by Peugeot as a form of fossil subsidy.

    The 3008 PHEVs charge at 3.6kW maximum so don’t plug them into a rapid charger as your car may be damaged when you return. Stick with home charging & AC charge posts.

     

     

    in reply to: On a drive to eat healthier. #141102
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I’ve been told I’m a reprobate for eating my usual breakfast of prawns.

     

    in reply to: Game changer all-electric Hyundai Ioniq 5 #141083
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Currently many car manufacturers charge a premium for their BEVs, but in the UK there is a change happening, as the Pound appreciates against the US Dollar, the Tesla becomes cheaper. At what point does a Tesla become cheaper than BEVs built in the EU, & will the EU car companies drop their prices or simply go out of business in the UK?

     

    in reply to: Large (ish) EV #140943
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The Ionic 5 is capable of towing 1600kg, enabling us to change from a PHEV to a full EV

    There’s a problem though, the EV chargers, how do you charge the car without unhitching the caravan?

    There are some chargers that would be OK, perhaps some of the Ionity chargers (Cobham Services would be OK), but most are not here in the UK. Fastned chargers in the Netherlands look OK. Need to keep an eye open for chargers that are tow accessible.

     

    in reply to: First IONIQ launch #140824
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ah yes, an 800V battery, so much faster charging as seen in the Porsche Taycan already, plus the vehicle-to-load technology means you can plug into it to power things at 240V (ish).

    A welcome step forward by Hyundai.

     

    in reply to: diesel and petrol keep going up – i need an EV #140375
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The trouble here is that we’re swapping one horribly polluting & damaging industry for another not quite so horribly polluting & damaging industry.

    Perhaps contraception is the answer.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140373
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ah, Elon Musk said it.

    Well, here you go, & it’s OK to ask when that Tesla Roadster is coming on the scheme, but you already know what the reply will be:

    https://www.edfenergy.com/for-home/energywise/electric-cars-longest-range

     

    in reply to: diesel and petrol keep going up – i need an EV #140356
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    read that and then tell me is that what you want for cornwall.

    I remember playing on a beach in Cornwall & getting covered with oil from the Torrey Canyon, I also saw the dead & dying seagulls covered in oil.

    Cornwall is already battle scarred by millenia of mining metals such as tin, copper, arsenic, and from china clay (kaolinite) extraction.

    The lithium extraction so far proposed is from hydrothermal fluids that have picked up lithium from pegmatites & so is subsurface extraction using wellheads, together with geothermal heat recovery.

    We already have copper mines scarring areas of Cornwall, North Wales & the Lake District.

    REE deposits in the UK include the Loch Loyal syenite complex which would devastate a beautiful area, the  Mourne Mountains in NI have REEs too in alluvial deposits.

    Remember too that REEs are already used as catalysts in petroleum refining & that switching from one use to another is possible.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140352
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Why would you make that guess, gothitjulie? What do you base it on?

    Based on the company’s cars that are already 3-4 years ahead… Tesla, and the way that the rest are trying to play catch up.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140350
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Yes, gothitjulie, I know about current battery technology. I was asking about the proposed use of silicon anode cells.

    From the article detailing the tests on the silicon anode cells:

    “The cells tested by INL have completed 1,000 dynamic stress test (DST) cycles following the USABC three-hour charge protocol, and over 900 DST fast charge cycles using a 4C rate or 15-minute charging protocol under 100% depth of discharge (DOD). The high-rate capable cells can be charged to 80% of their capacity in 10 minutes and to 90% of their capacity in 15 minutes. Zenlabs says its silicon anode cells enable a vehicle with a 300-mile range, and a potential battery life of up to 300,000 miles.”

    in reply to: Ford confirms strategy to go fully electric by 2030 #140301
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Indeed, Brydo, and with Jaguar moving to mainly EVs by 2025 & already having their lovely iPace on the roads is helping.

    Wigwam, yes, good point, but the increased pace in sales of BEVs has the legacy fossil manufacturers worried too, the BEV market has gone from first adopters who have put up with low ranges, to corporate fleets looking to be able to sell their secondhand cars for a reasonable amount. People were shocked when ER started throwing themselves in front of fossil cars in Central London, but if they throw themselves in front of BEVs they’ll just get laughed at.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Yes, I think a power to weight ratio limit would be better than a BHP limit, you need a few extra BHP to move the larger battery around.

    Those larger wheels on the Enyaq SportLine will merely make it look prettier at the expense of range.

    in reply to: diesel and petrol keep going up – i need an EV #140297
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ian, your getting the BMW i3s made me go test drive one & hooked me on EVs as I found they were a hoot to drive compared to a nasty old fossil…. thankyou!

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140296
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    If this technology is going to be available soon combined with a decent range in the 300’s or 400’s I think it would tick every box. Of course there will still be some sceptics.

    I’d make a guess that those ranges & this battery tech will be in cars around 2025.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140288
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    But what will the working life of such cells be? We know fast charging reduces the life of current EV batteries.

    1000 cycles degradation detailed in those graphs, so about 82% capacity after charging from zero to 100% 1000 times, something you’d never do. Most BEVs get charged from 10-30% charge upto 80-90% on rapid chargers, the slower AC charging at home doesn’t heat up & degrade the batteries in the same way & the car slows the charge rate down to the 6 amps minimum 98-100% as it does its balance charge (where all the cells are brought upto the same SoC by supressing individual cell charge using the BMS (battery management system)).

    N.B. Most lithium batteries go bad because of BMS faults & engineers underrating the BMS to save money, but in cars they usually try better because of the higher values of such large battery packs.

    N.B. 1000 charges is about 1 per week for 20 years, 2 per week for 10 years, etc.

    N.B. The easiest way to kill a lithium battery pack is to leave it at zero charge for a few months, it won’t revive again unless you take it all apart & gently shunt some power into each cell from spare charged cells, and you’ll not be doing that as it would take an age without dedicated equipment.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by gothitjulie.
Viewing 25 replies - 51 through 75 (of 696 total)