gothitjulie

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  • in reply to: MX-30 EV – Self empowerment driving vehicle #142335
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    BMW i3, VW Sharan, SEAT Alhambra, Berlingo/Rifter etc., you could potentially do this with, & I’ve seen some interesting hoisting mechanisms with a track for pulling the wheelchair into the rear on old Berlingos.

    Then there’s another solution, the topbox, again with a hoist to pull a wheelchair into it & close it.

     

    in reply to: How has the pandemic affected you mentally? #142260
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Mentally I’m probably still OK as I never seem to have any time to think anyway.

    Physically I’m a real mess, not being able to “walk, run, or cycle” for exercise has meant I’ve lost a lot of the muscle tone needed to push the wheelchair & it’ll be back to practicing on the flat wheras I live in a very hilly town, hence I need to get myself down the coast & push myself along the promenade. Maybe when we can travel for exercise again I’ll feel better pretty quickly.

    Interestingly my parents haven’t had their vaccinations yet, they’re in their 80s & can’t get to vaccination centres & I can’t take them as they’re 250 miles away. I’ve not been called for vaccination myself either.

     

     

    in reply to: Loose Women #142259
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I’ve stopped watching TV because it was all utter rubbish all the time.

    “Loose Women”, I assume it’s the BBC?

     

    in reply to: Motability Deals And Offers #142105
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Absolutely fantastic prices for a great EV. Get it now and watch the fuel savings mount up. Your AP will soon be paid back in fuel savings and it is a very good car. This won’t last long IMO so if its the car you get your order in.

    With two 25 mile round trips for the school run each day the savings would be huge.

    50 miles – petrol cost maybe £7-8?

    50 miles – electricity from overnight charge at 5p/kWh, £2.50

    190 days in a school year, so £8 x 190 = £1,520 vs £2.50 x 190 = £475, yes, over a grand a year, it’s significant. Just think how much less fossil fumes outside the school too….

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Informative (as gothitjulie’s posts generally are) but depressing that this is the reality we are being forced to confront.

    Agreed, but a couple of mitigating factors here, the first is that battery technology is improving & is already far better than it was a few years ago as manufacturers introduce active heating & cooling to their battery pack & adjust the cobalt ratio. The second is that for many people, rapid & ultra-rapid charging isn’t something they need to do very often as they charge using AC chargers at home/supermarket/street lamp etc.

    When I’ve charged outside my home at -5C this winter I’ve seen no slowdown in the 7kW charging speed until it reaches 98% when it slows as the BMS balances the battery, it does this at any temperature & it needs to be done about once a month to maintain battery health over the long term.

     

    Hint: If you balance charge to 100% then don’t leave it sitting at 100% for a length of time as it degrades the battery. Driving it the next day to reduce it from 100% is absolutely fine.

    Not sure if anyone remembers going to foreign climes & leaving the car sitting for two weeks, well, ideally leave it sat at around 70% charge, although anywhere between 20-80% will be fine. Same with a fossil, in hot weather the fuel will expand so you’d not leave it with a full tank.

     

    in reply to: Motability Deals And Offers #142093
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Wow, those are huge savings on the Kona. Surely worth a call to my local dealer in North Yorkshire?

    Do it if you can, the 64kWh Kona is a good car if you can fit everything you need into the smallish boot.

    As for which trim to go for, both are pretty well equipped anyway, the Premium SE is about extra comfort over an already comfortable car.

    If I was at the point I could order a car & I wanted an EV, and could manage with the Kona’s boot size, then I’d be ordering it right away at those prices, it outclasses my e2008 in every department except handling & it’s close in that too.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I don’t know if you are a blood donor, Gothitjulie, but if you are put me down for a pint. Anyone who can get so inspired over this could definitely give me a lock-down boost. Now if it were the second coming I might open the curtains.

    Used to be a blood donor many years ago, O negative universal donor, they liked me.

    I’m not sure where the inspiration comes from but I’ve always had it, I’ve always been the impetuous bouncy one who adopts tech fairly early. Examples would be things like being at university & returning to the parentals on a train, & I’d be listening to music with headphones on, then I’d want to change the tape, but wait, that’s not a Sony Walkman, it’s a Sony Discman II, & the onlookers are shocked that some young student type is changing the CD, & it’s only 1986. Many years later I used mini disc players in the same way although who uses minidiscs now? As for mobile phones, I adopted them once they shrunk to a reasonable size, around 1992, and I phoned my partner from the bath to request more Champagne & they couldn’t quite work out just how I could phone the landline from the bath… I’m decadent of course, I always find a way.

    The other side of me is the helpful side, a couple of days back I’d plugged the car into a brand new 7kW post at my usual supermarket & a woman approached me to ask if it was easy to use as she had just ordered a BEV herself & was nervous. I showed her how it all worked & how easy it was. I guess for many women it’s just having another woman to ask, wheras I’m the type that works it out for myself but wouldn’t ask a man either (I run with the idea that if a man designed & made it, it must be very simple).

    As for getting inspired over EVs, I’m a scientist, science involves spending hours peering down a microscope to understand what you’re seeing, EVs are much simpler yet more exciting.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Both Kia & Hyundai will be releasing a range of new EVs over the next few years, this is just the first one from Kia, and we can look forward to a range of variants.

    I put the teaser up to see if there would be a reaction as those of us who follow EVs already know that our best hopes for decent EVs on Motability are probably offerings from Kia & Hyundai, or whatever the Chinese throw at the market via old european badges (MG, Volvo), & own brands (Xpeng etc.).

    Also, the massive demand for the best of the non Tesla mid range EVs, the Kia eNiro, has kept it off the scheme, but the attention will now switch to the EV6 & maybe, just maybe, we’ll get the long awaited Kia eNiro on the scheme for a while.

     

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Not sure if this site will help, there are a lot of answers there –

    https://youreable.livingmadeeasy.org.uk/forum.php

    in reply to: BMW raises i3 prices by £3665 eight years since launch #142056
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Really interesting the I3 is really well put together, is purely a battery driven car rather than most of its competitors which are converted ice vehicles. That said its been out a long time and other cars are able to go further. That said what would I change mine for at a similar price point. Its range and size don’t really cause me any issues. Maybe new Ioniq?

    Possibly the Hyundai Kona or the Kia Soul.

    By the time you’re ready to change, ID3, ID4, Enyaq, Ioniq 5, Kia EV6, or any of the other models that will arrive in the next year or two.

    Liked the I3s that I test drove a lot, but it wasn’t that practical for my rural driving over the high speed potholes.

    EVs are evolving quickly & BMW need to fill that space that the old range extender motor used with more batteries to keep it relevant.

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Now wouldn’t it be nice if the people in government grew an extra brain cell & implemented ISO 15118

    For those who aren’t aware, that’s the global standard for plugging in your car to a charger & the charger reads the data from your car & it simply charges your account, so no contactless bank cards, no RFID membership cards, no phone apps that are flaky, it simply works, just like plugging in a Tesla to a Tesla Supercharger does.

    https://insideevs.com/news/454723/electrify-america-launches-plugcharge-payment-technology/

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The Instavolt chargers are at Corley Services on the M6, gothitjulie. So why not ultrarapid?

    Length of time these have been in planning, start of 2018 there were not really any EVs that could benefit from faster charging except for Tesla, and Tesla already have their own chargers.

    These old service stations also have major problems with existing Grid infrastructure, many are miles from a decent Grid connection & keeping everything down to 8 x 50kW = 400kW instead of 8 x 350kW = 2800kW will have been a consideration.

    Longer term the Government has made £900 million available for future Grid connections to MSAs (Motorway Service Areas) which will hopefully be “fat” enough to supply a lot more than 2800kW.

    So, we’re seeing these chargers as a stop-gap, the “we will have 6 chargers at every MSA by 2023” part of the story. We know this is an interim promise & that far larger numbers will be required by 2030, just look at the Tesla charger installations & the fact that they need to expand them already & you’ll get an idea, many already have more than 12 superchargers.

     

    in reply to: Are you racist? #141912
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I don’t care about racism as I have enough problems of my own to deal with & always have. If anyone wants to label me a racist then that is fine by me, I’m used to dealing with ignorant people.

    As for my own skin colour, well, mostly white with highly visible port wine stain birthmark, don’t start a skin colour debate with me as I’ll have you for breakfast.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    how long does a car have to sit on charge in comparison to petrol refuel?

    Well, at these Instavolt chargers at Corley it’ll probably take around 40 minutes to grab a decent charge as they are only the 50kW Rapid type, not the ultra rapids that are needed at a motorway service station. The reason for this though is the length of time it has taken to get the installation of these chargers started, the planning submissions started in 2018. 8 on one side, 7 on the other. PAP/2017/0616 approved 02/01/18 validity 3y. PAP/2018/0056 approved 12/03/18 validity 3y. PAP/2019/0047 approved 21/03/19 validity 3y. PAP/2020/0078 approved 25/03/20 validity 3y.

    Down the road at Junction 1 of the M6 is the new service station that will have 350kW EH (Ecotricity) chargers, although as they’ll be Ecotricity there’s a question as to will they be reliable or not. There will also be Tesla chargers & in the petrol station there will be two 150kW BP Pulse chargers.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Might be worth bringing a disability discrimination test case against one of these providers.

    Also, some EVs have towing capabilities, how do you charge in these bays when you’re towing?

    If you look at the Fastned newtork in the Netherlands you’ll see that they’ve thought about such things years ago, so there’s no excuse for the UK to be making these mistakes.

    There is one upside to these chargers at Corby though, they are Instavolt chargers, second only to Tesla superchargers in reliability.

    Here’s a video that helps explain why there is finally some movement in the provision of chargers at motorway service areas (MSAs) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twSICy5kqWM

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Not sure about paying extra for heated seats in an EV, they’re kind of essential as they use a lot less electricity than the aircon does so we preferentially use the heated seats.

    You’ll also be wanting parking sensors & a reversing camera to get very close to those ultra-rapid chargers with the very short leads (BP Pulse 150kW).

    Good sized car though, it’s needed on the scheme.

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I worry about these projects being out-of-date soon after they are completed.

    Currently most EV cars are in the 350V to 450V range & make use of the 400V DC chargers, those being the 50kW rapids & the 150kW ultra rapids.

    But, the Porsche Taycan & the soon to arrive Hyundai Ioniq 5 use a doubled-up system of around 800V & benefit from much faster charging only when using an 800V ultra rapid charger (Ionity chargers & a select few others).

    Within only a few years it’s likely that all new EVs will be using the 800V standard & that all these expensive facilities will need upgrading.

    Another thought is that 7kW AC posts might make more sense in a park & ride car park, you park up & plug in & off you go into town for the morning, & when you come back to your car after 4 hours it’ll probably be pretty near fully charged. Three phase 22kW AC posts make even more sense.

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    You’ll find that BEV drivers don’t rely on 7kW AC charging posts as part of their journeying, if they are there at a stop then plugging in for an hour whilst you have lunch is great but not critical to a journey, the only time they matter that much is when all the faster chargers in the area have failed & they risk being stranded.

    So, the 7kW AC chargers at the Aldi being blocked is perhaps rude but look back over the years & see how these posts were put in & then simply not used anyway as there were so few EVs around. My local Asda has teh same issue, two out of the 4 charging spaces always blocked by the same PHEVs that are never charging. Don’t rely on them being available.

    With a PHEV, always leave home with a full charge, and always plug in at the destination if you can using AC posts or a domestic socket, don’t forget to unplug once charged. It’s the leaving home fully charged that will add up the electric miles the most.

    Try to leave a 7kW post at overnight destinations for BEVs that will need to charge for around 7 hours.

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Long time EV drivers don’t stop at a charger & completely charge to 100% because of the way that batteries work.

    The fastest charging is at the lower states of charge, so 10-80% charge will very likely take less time than 80-100%, my own EV charges upto 27% at 100kW, then upto 52% at 72kW, then upto 72% at 54kW, then upto 84% at 27kW, then it gets really slow, seeing 13kW, then 7kW & the last 2% at 3kW. You’d unplug from the DC rapid & plug into a 7kW AC post to achieve 100% where the car is trying to balance the battery.

    So, for me, I’ll try to stop at 10-15% SoC & charge until I reach 72%, then I’ll set off to my next charger/destination, I’m not going to sit around on a rapid or ultra rapid charger blocking others from charging for the rest of their journey, that would be incredibly rude & selfish & is why rapid chargers have overstay penalties. As my car will do 10% to 80% in 30 minutes on the right ultra rapid charger then that’s the range I work in. Hopefully the next generations of these EVs will charge much faster, we are already seeing that in Tesla/Porsche/Hyundai.

    I tend also to charge to 100% on my home charger the night before a long journey so I set off with the maximum range. It’s also worth knowing that it’s best not to leave these batteries at 100% SoC for too long (a few hours after reaching the 100% before a journey is fine, a few days will degrade the battery).

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I was waiting for that super brain of your to gives us some real life costs, we need real users like yourself to guide us all through the EV changes.

    Ah, now, I’ve been a little economical with the truth with the charging figures, as often the Ionity chargers will limit to 37 or 43kW rather than the higher power figures quoted, & whilst sat at a BP Pulse ultra rapid 150kW charger yesterday it was trickling around 50kW maximum (measured by my latest PSA monitoring toy with the USB dongle plugged through a cunning adapter cable – yes I really am a nerd) and was decidedly unstable, the chap on the next charger gave up charging his Jaguar iPace when his charger failed after reconnecting several times & the screen showed it as being broken after.

    Some chargers are decidedly flaky, the ones here, Ionity & BP Pulse ultra rapids were all made by ABB, & they’re supposed to be pretty reliable, perhaps it’s the way they have been set up, or, more likely, their connection & load on the grid is being limited. Some of the BP Pulse installations do pull constantly on the grid & store energy in batteries to supply at higher rates when an EV demands it, Ionity too, maybe we are draining these chargers more quickly than they can charge their battery banks.

    Tesla superchargers also use battery storage & limit charge speeds as seen in some of Bjorn Nyland’s videos so it’s all across the industry.

    There are all sorts of snippets that you pick up about EVs when you follow them a lot, such as the Renault Zoe being a choosy little beastie with chargers, if it detects even the slightest residual to earth it won’t charge, wheras other cars will tolerate this upto where the RCD on your distribution board (a.k.a. fusebox in your house) trips, which is around 6mA if memory serves.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    So better charging at home it would seem electric not worth the hassle unless you are always near home then city car electric ok

    Well, not quite, if your journeys are mainly near home for say 90% of the year then you save a vast amount charging at home, so it offsets when you go on a summer holiday in the EV & you use those Ionity chargers at 69 p per kWh on the outward & inbound legs of your holiday. As you’d only book holiday accomodation that has an EV charging point, that won’t cost you much more than charging at home anyway (you would, wouldn’t you? when I look for a hotel or other accomodation I only look at the ones with EV charging, the other ones can go bust).

     

    p.s. Both Brydo & myself already use Octopus Energy as our provider & we also have the refer codes, no need to spam them on every post & the thread is Brydo’s.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ionity is a group of fossil manufacturers who have to release EVs to meet pollution credit goals & it is part funded by the EU, so of course it’s a corrupt papering over cracks & fleecing consumer scheme.

    Tesla superchargers cost about 24 p per kWh as a benchmark.

    PodPoint rapids 23 p per kWh

    BP Pulse ultra rapids (150kW) 42 p per kWh, 27 p per kWh for members

    Many other providers charge in the 30-40 p per kWh range

    Last summer when the Ionity chargers at Cobham services were free vending, you’d see a constant stream of EV owners turning up to try them, but now they’re almost always deserted & the cheaper charging opportunities in the area are taken instead, but an occasional Audi eTron or VW ID3 does turn up & use their discount card (We Charge Go – £5.99 per month (introductory 1st year free on ID3) and 45 p per kWh. We Charge Plus – £13.99 per month (introductory 1st year £7.99 per month on ID3) and 25 p per kWh).

    (As a comparison to these figures, BP Pulse membership is £7.85 per month, then AC chargers 12 p per kWh (supermarket BP pulse posts are free), 50kW DC chargers 15 p per kWh, and ultra rapid DC chargers 27 p per kWh, BUT, anyone can get a BP Pulse membership card).

     

     

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by gothitjulie.
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Be careful with Octopus Electric Juice, it’s a great idea but you still pay the same amount for the charge as you would using contactless (credit or debit card) with Ionity, that’s 69p kWh, if you have a car from one of the manufacturers involved with Ionity it will be much cheaper using the card you get from that manufacturer, & if you don’t then you can still use a ChargePoint card I think it is to get it at 58p kWh.

    So yes, an Electric Juice card is a useful car to have (I don’t have one yet despite being with Octopus Energy), but all it saves is the hassle of having ever more cards, & the nasty deposit charges that most of the companies issuing cards charge.

     

    in reply to: Electric Volvo XC20 SUV planned to sit below XC40 #141556
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Any BEV is a welcome addition, but I wonder about all these SUVs, they are aerodynamically inefficient & not everyone needs the higher seating position.

    Says me, driving a compact SUV e-2008.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Currently we have a disabled class for the road fund licence, the idea being that we can’t simply use public transport or walk everywhere because of our disabilities. Will that be carried over to road pricing?

    We also have exemptions from congestion charging & some toll roads (e.g. Dartford Crossing), & private roads we can obtain a discounted flat rate for those who will use the road often (M6 Toll). Congestion charge exemptions cover us again because we often can’t simply use public transport.

    The rural area problem already exists with the current system of road funding, & it would be interesting to see how much tax revenue rural driving currently brings in. It might not be worth charging per mile for rural roads & all the per mile taxation gets done on the trunk roads only, impacting on the already existing taxation penalty of living in rural areas positively.

     

Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 696 total)