gothitjulie

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  • in reply to: Does anyone have an electric car. #121541

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I’ve only had mine for a couple of weeks so it’s a little early for me to be able to comment, but I get the sense that the EV is so much smoother to drive that any fossil I’ve had, and it seems fairly planted too which will be the low down weight of that battery.

    Drifted the back end out a little on poor surfaces, and I’ve spun up the front (drive) wheels a bit, but both when I’ve been trying to to find out where the grip limits are.

    Fast enough for the motorways (mine is artificially limited to 93mph/150kmh).

    Initially nervous about charging an EV but that mystery didn’t last long, simply follow the instructions on a rapid DC charger or an AC post, or simply plug in at home.

    EVs aren’t silent running as you’d expect, there’s still the tyre noise on the road surface, just no engine to drown out all the other noises you’d otherwise never notice.

    I think you should go test drive some EVs.

     

    As for shortcomings, perhaps there’s the having to plan longer journeys to include the coffee break/charging. More local driving is about taking the free charging post at the supermarket or other establishment to suck up some free electrons, might as well, even though it’ll only charge perhaps 25miles worth per hour. Not sure what to do with the 10p off per litre vouchers though, perhaps sell them to fossil owners.

    Currently train station car parks are pretty empty due to COVID, so if you wangle free parking for the disabled (usually means registering with some organisation) & the car park has charging posts that are free, you could leave your car there for a full charge upon occasion. You could even try out a train if you’re brave enough.

     

     

     

    in reply to: PHEV/EV no off road parking #121481

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The idea with the PHEV is that you charge it at home and/or work so that your commute is mainly electric, you could do the same with supermarket trips if they have the charge posts. Remember that PHEVs don’t rapid DC charge.

    With the much greater storage capacity of the EV it becomes possible to DC charge substantial amounts in a short time so it would be possible to live without the home charger in most places, but the benefit of the home charger is the convenience, adding that odd 40% here & there so the car is left with an 80 to 90% charge, ready to go. The slow charge to full occasionally for the battery balancing will be a bind without the home charger but it’s still possible.

    Some councils are adding lamppost charging, some are adding a few charging posts, find out if your council is providing charge points, if they are you could be using them to charge up instead of needing that home charger.

     

    in reply to: mg5-ev will we get this on #121435

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Don’t see why not, it’s a 52.5kW battery, marginally larger than the 50kW EVs already on the scheme (Zoe, PSA Corsa/e-208/e-2008/DS3).

     

    Other cars to look out for are the Kia/Hyundai EVs, Kia delivered more EVs in the UK in July than in the whole of the previous year & hope to do so again in August, those year long waiting lists are going.

     

    in reply to: Peugeot e-2008 Allure #121310

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    So, not “as advertised”, feel free to tell them to get stuffed as they are not keeping to the deal.

    in reply to: Honda e #121248

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Not a lot of car for a lot of AP 130 ish range Minimal storage for some who needs to carry anything with them Might just be me but not a fan of small bevs Might suit others as we all have different needs

    Look at the positives though, the charge port is in the right place, at the front, high up.

    The wing mirrors won’t get knocked off in the City.

    You can cook your lunch in it.

    It’s very nerdy.

     

    OK, it has some downsides…

    Small

    Low range

    Doesn’t like being repeatedly charged on the same day

     

     

    in reply to: Honda e #121246

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Another compliance ev. Low range city car with lots of tech.

    But it’s cute!

     

    in reply to: Diesel or Electric whats best full tank 700 miles £65 #121062

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Peter, not sure about the Scottish rapid chargers, there are potential problems in remote areas with the app & having a mobile phone signal, perhaps someone who lives in Scotland can shed some light on potential issues.

    I’d say plugshare & Zap-Map planning is in order.

     

    in reply to: Diesel or Electric whats best full tank 700 miles £65 #121009

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    “This can only mean higher tariffs for home charging.” Or we could get changed by the miles driven. Either way, the Government are going to find a way to recoup the £billions they currently get every year from ICE fuel sales. Once enough of us are using Electric vehicles the heavy ‘Taxation’, by whatever means, will kick in.

    Sorry, I actually meant that at some point soon the taxes that would be lost will have be recovered. So EV charging will become quite a lot more expensive, wherever you charge. 👍

    I have to agree the tax revenue will have to be clawed back at some stage, I cant see some sort of tariffs per mile using some satellite technology ?

     

    The home wall chargers now have to be “smart” since July, so they could theoretically report back how much electricity is put into the car, BUT, you could simply charge with a “granny charger” or similar to get around that, so I’d agree it’ll be the per mile method. Perhaps fossils (ICE cars) will be paying the per mile & the duty on their fuel at the same time.

    in reply to: Diesel or Electric whats best full tank 700 miles £65 #121008

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Peter, beware those Scottish rapid chargers, some of them are now charging, the charge being set locally, I think Aberdeen is an example I’ve heard about. You’ll hopefully have your ChargePlace Scotland RFID already (CYC card works just the same).

    I’m thinking of a little trip in September, Dover to Durness, been to both but never on the same road trip, lots of charge stops, but I’m in no hurry. If I get too carried away I’ll be doing LeJOG backwards home.

     

    in reply to: Diesel or Electric whats best full tank 700 miles £65 #120912

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    266 miles, and needing two top-ups. … and this is the way forward?

     

    That’s 2 comfort stops with rapid recharging whilst we grab a coffee (1st stop as it’s a 125kW charger so 20 minute stop) and a bite to eat (2nd stop as it’s only a 50kW charger so 35 minute stop).

     

    It’s still relatively early in EV development, people are still working out what size batteries are needed & the above journey can easily be done on two charges, but, with the way that batteries work these charges are to under 80% as the really fast charging will be between 10-75% of battery state of charge. The battery will be 100% SOC at the start of the journey from an overnight charge where time isn’t an issue. Three charges (the overnight slow plus the 2 rapid) is the right balance as it ties the stops into the 2 hour mark, so drive for 2 hours then charge for 20 minutes, drive for 2 hours then charge for 35 minutes. There’s more to a journey than refueling in any car.

     

    Costs is another thing that could be included in the calculations, as we know the cost of electricity varies, from the 5p per kW/h of the home on overnight charge, to the 69p per kW/h of an Ionity charger that won’t be on this route. 1st stop is 35p per kW/h and the second is 15p per kW/h. I don’t select specific rapid chargers due to cost on such a journey because I’m looking for the best journey times rather than cost, the cost comes in when charging nearer home during the course of journeys I make much more frequently. So, 5p per kW/h and 15p per kW/h is fine, 69p per kW/h at Ionity isn’t going to happen when I can use the nearby Polar ultra rapid for 19p per kW/h and achieve the same charge speed.

     

    Now all this calculation to be able to make journeys seems complex, and it would be without a few apps, the one that is making things easier is A Better Route Planner, and it allows for fuel costs, charge speeds, and even wind direction & strength, in its calculations. You can even have the app redirect you to another charger when someone else is charging on your first choice of charger.

    If you really want range anxiety then you can program ABRP so that it tells you to drive below a certain speed on each journey leg to achieve the desired range between chargers, I plotted a journey to the North Cape in Norway, it found a leg between chargers that required a full 100% charge & a speed of 45mph just to be able to complete, the alternative was to re-route the last 1000 miles switching from Swedish to Norwegian roads with the lower speeds & the ferries. I’d take the more scenic route through Norway on a once in a lifetime trip.

     

     

     

     

    in reply to: Diesel or Electric whats best full tank 700 miles £65 #120884

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    With the electric car you currently need to plan the refuels a lot better, for instance I was planning a possible journey to see my parents, a distance of 266 miles and I’ll be wanting to drive sufficiently fast so will want two stops in the electric car on the journey. I found a new bank of Instavolt chargers has just appeared near my planned first stop, so, instead of waiting for a single rapid charger or finding it broken, I’ll be able to pull up to the bank of 8 rapid chargers & hopefully at least some of them will be working…. this is a major thing in the UK, finding chargers that are reliable & that are free to use when you arrive. Finding a bank of 8 just off a motorway junction is a major step forward (M40 J11 – Instavolt – 125kW Rapid chargers, so that cuts maybe 20 minutes off my journey time). 1st step of the journey is 103 miles & I’ll be leaving with 100% charge from home, so I can cruise at 70mph no problem.

    When it comes to the second step of that journey, it’s a single 50kW rapid charger, it may be in use when I arrive, it may be broken, this is where the range anxiety would kick in, so I’m looking for a better option or other chargers nearby.

    In the diesel I would simply fill up at the start of each journey, no range anxiety.

    On the motorbike I’d ride it down to maybe 40 miles left in the tank before looking for the petrol station. Motorbike ranges are similar to the current crop of electric cars.

     

     

     

    in reply to: Who arranges EV Home Charger installation? #120863

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Also having BP Chargemaster problems, they want things like a copy of the V5, I can’t believe Motability hasn’t made it clear that they have these things, not us, BP Chargemaster appears to be run by Luton’s cretins.

    I have the car but not the home charger, thinking of just installing my own as I can’t deal with the threatening tone from BP Chargemaster’s side, they seem to think it’s OK to bully the disabled.

     

    in reply to: Peugeot 2008 SUV Electric #120830

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Currently NO, it’s not available as an optional extra.

    They try to save weight on the electric versions wherever they can to offset some of the battery weight.

    Hyundai Ioniq Premium SE might be the option you’re looking for, although I found it rather low down. Bear in mind that the Ioniq is more efficient than all the other electric cars on the scheme, so a direct comparison of battery sizes is meaningless (Ioniq has about 38kW usable battery, e-2008 is about 45kW usuable, MG ZS EV is around 42kW usable, but the Ioniq is far more efficient as are all the Korean EVs). What this means is that at 35mph the e-2008 has the longest range of the above, but at 70mph the Ioniq will easily outrange the others.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by  gothitjulie.
    in reply to: Peugeot e-2008 Allure #120828

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    One thing about the e-2008 that you’re sure to love is the Peugeot “MyPeugeot” app for it, yesterday morning my e-2008 became a fossil fueled version but by afternoon it was back to being the electric version. Peugeot are “working” on the app & it’s not stable yet, but I usually find it useful to check the state of charge in %, so at the moment I have 82% which is a good level whilst it sits outside (best not to store with the battery at or near 100% or extremely low, top up to 100% just before you leave on a journey if you need to).

    Now if you were interested in the Zoe you’d have another french car app that is supposed to be just as bad. Perhaps it’s the language barrier.

    Fortunately you don’t need the app to enjoy the car, its really for checking the state of charge whilst you’re in a cafe & the car is charging.

     

    in reply to: What car has most extras included #120463

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I’d say that the Peugeot e-2008 GT has all the extras, but, it lacks even a basic engine.

     

    in reply to: Still to early for EV especially for disabled. #119844

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Still not a single decent sized BEV on the market that can fit my mobility gear in and when they eventually get round to making some the price will rule them out from getting on the scheme, add in the fact of no off street parking and regular long journeys and it’s going to be years before I will be going electric.

    A year ago there were just a couple of BEVs on the scheme with an AP of over £5000….

    Now there are many with APs starting from £0

    Currently there is the Nissan NV200 on the scheme with variants from £3,999 to £4,499

     

    Now, I’m not claiming that the Nissan NV200 is a great vehicle for range, but it’s getting into that size bracket and there are others not currently on the scheme.

    Perhaps there will be a large range of these van derived vehicles on the scheme in a year’s time.

    Another year down the line there may be some with ranges of a few hundred miles.

    in reply to: Ford Kuga 2020 PHEV best hybrid yet? #119781

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I understand that, but I don’t think PHEVs are suitable for anything other than slow charging at home. It’s a double compromise, first carrying around an extra engine (petrol engine + electric motor), then carrying around a heavy extra battery pack too, I understand the hybrid concept & it does indeed give better fuel consumption to a petrol engine, but then to add more weight leaves it gasping as it struggles to pull the load around which costs even more in fuel. PHEVs can work if your commute is under 15 miles each way, I get that, but for anything longer they don’t make good sense.

    Also the cost of the KUGA PHEV, it’s almost into Tesla Model 3 territory, the gap is narrowing with the extra expense of these extra gadgets & the markets are not going to be kind to the KUGA PHEV within just a few years now, it made sense 10 years ago.

     

    With MG looking at releasing perhaps a 65kW/h MG ZS EV in 2022, a car similar in size to the KUGA, it’s looking like curtains for Ford.

     

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by  gothitjulie.
    in reply to: Ford Kuga 2020 PHEV best hybrid yet? #119777

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    It has exhaust pipes…. say no more.

     

    in reply to: Electric Car Owners #119775

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    @gothitjulie said: “In the European market (including the UK), there is no MG ZS EV app support for things like remotely switching the aircon on. The cars sold in this market don’t have the 4G unit for this feature.” The MyDS app I have for my DS3 Crossback E-Tense EV is useless. I’ve just recently got it working, sometimes, after 4 months! I can, however, set pre-conditioning up from the car touchscreen and also set delayed charging too. I wonder whether these features are available in the MG ZS software too?

    Are there any firmware updates for your DS3, and are there any app updates to go with it? I know the Pug e-208 owners lost functionality here in the UK after Peugeot forgot to include the UK update for the app.

    For the MG ZS EV there are indeed menu options for timed events as far as I’m aware, although they have just had a “Comfort Update 2” that has dealt with many of the problems so it may all be even better now. There are also more updates due later this year.

     

    in reply to: Disabled parking in big places during covid19 #119773

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Seen this in a few of the local supermarkets so no longer use those places, I’ve taken my business elsewhere, permanently.

    ASDA had a different variation, have a queue snaking around then up a kerb so in a wheelchair you were left with no escape. Stopped using this company everywhere, permanently. Hope they go bust.

    Tesco have a very narrow gap to get through, a post being halfway across the queue so you can try either side & my chair will only just squeeze through. However, they don’t insist I take the wheelchair on this assault course, allowing me to jump the silliness.

     

     

    in reply to: Motability or finance? #119712

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I looked at this from the viewpoint of mileage, if I was doing very few miles over the term of the lease then it would be better to buy & keep a vehicle long term (20 years perhaps, like my dad has always done). For those of us who do around 15k miles per year though it can make more sense to lease.

    Add to this the problem of cars degrading because they have plastic light covers, electronics that date quickly, etc., and anything other than a very basic car doesn’t make sense for long term ownership. My son has my 1997 Peugeot 306 LXDT for instance, he complains that it doesn’t even have bluetooth or a satnav (remember we could read maps in 1997 and phones could be dangerously held in your hand whilst driving).

    The advantage of the Motability package is that everything is included except the fuel so that’s peace of mind, and when you’re disabled that peace of mind is worth something.

     

    in reply to: Seat Alhambara #119711

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I can confirm that after 3 years of running my Alhambra 2.o tdi dsg Lux that it has managed about 42mpg & I’m known for having a light accelerator foot.

    Mine has folding mirrors from the long press to lock on the key fob, but I programmed it myself using the OBDeleven PRO. I never bothered changing the door locking to activate above a certain speed though, so it doesn’t lock automatically whilst pulling away… I meant to, just never got around to doing it.

    If all goes to plan I’ll be handing the Alhambra back on Wednesday, it’s been a good car, but it’s a bit big in city traffic and it’s greedy on the diesel compared to my previous C4 Grand Picasso (53.9mpg after 3 years).

    in reply to: Electric Car Owners #119708

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    if i was to get EV MG and my issue with it is trying to charge it could the charging cover be hinged down the way, left or right to make charging easier

    There is an MG ZS EV forum somewhere ( https://www.mgevs.com/forums/mg-zs-ev-forum.2/ ) & they may have discussed some modifications such as this, but I don’t know of any that have done this. The charge port door has electronics too I think, perhaps a switch to tell the car if the charge port door has been left open & some leads for the twinkly LED lights whilst charging.

    The charge port door would need to be replaced completely because of the way it hinges, so you’d need to obtain & modify a spare so it could be put back to “normal” before returning in 3 years. I think someone will likely do this, or use the other method of running without the charge port door completely. SAIC has made this far more complicated than it needs to be & a simple bottom hinged panel with a locking mechanism at the top and a seal would be a far superior engineering solution.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by  gothitjulie.
    in reply to: Electric Car Owners #119707

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Thanks again. I also need the electric seats on the MG. I did call Peugeot to discuss their electric SUV but they didn’t call back where as MG have been very helpful and also offered cash back. Does anyone have one and know if it works with Android phones?

    The MG ZS EV does have Android Auto.

    but….

    In the European market (including the UK), there is no MG ZS EV app support for things like remotely switching the aircon on. The cars sold in this market don’t have the 4G unit for this feature.

    This was the situation a few months back.

    in reply to: Electric Car Owners #119644

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Well, I didn’t tackle martino’s issue with the MG ZS EV, the kneel down on the ground to plug into the charge port issue. Yes, it’s very low and although OK from a low wheelchair, it’s not good if you are standing & trying to connect the car.

    It’s a shame as the charge port on the front of the car is a great position, but this is let down with the low height of the port and the main problem with the hinge up design of the cover that means you need to go searching underneath to plug in. Yes, you’ll learn to do this by touch but it’s not ideal.

    Alternative is the left rear side ported Peugeot e-2008, although it’s not as big inside & the boot isn’t a great size. The Pug e-2008 is also more expensive on the scheme, although it probably has 10 miles or more range per charge.

    I wouldn’t rule out the Zoe ZE50 with the CCS, it has a far better range than either the MG ZS EV or the Pug e-2008, and it’s quite spacious (yes, I had a sit in one last month in a dealership), but you can’t alter the seat height and it feels like you are a couple of inches too high up in the driver’s seat. You would probably get used to that. Space in the rear seats is limited, but the boot space is better than the Pug e-2008, and the ZE50 has a split rear bench that the earlier models lacked. The Zoe ZE50 has the best range of the EVs available on the scheme currently, but you need to take into account the faster charge speeds on the MG ZS EV (max around 85kW) and Pug e-2008 (max around 98kW) and those BP (Polar) & Shell (Recharge) 150kW chargers popping up at garages.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 3 days ago by  gothitjulie.
Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 285 total)