gothitjulie

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 640 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • in reply to: Do you have an exercise routine? #141240
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Used to swim, lots, & since the pools closed I’ve lost muscle tone.

    Using a manual wheelchair to exercise here is impossible because it’s simply too hilly, & until we’re allowed to travel to exercise again there is no exercise. Only walking, running & cycling allowed, & I can’t do any of those.

     

     

    in reply to: On a drive to eat healthier. #141189
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The problem with prawns is they are high in salt, so if you do venture down the decadence of prawns for breakfast remember you’ll use up half your salt intake for the day before it gets started.

    The good thing about prawns is they are very low in fats & carbs of course, hence the snowflake generation came up with the idea of prawn avocado to counter the health benefits, although oleic acid (the fat in avocados & olive oil) probably isn’t much of a worry in anything but the calorie counting department.

    And with that I’m off out to sneak up on a pheasant or grouse in the EV to bag my dinner……

    Knowing my luck it’ll be roadkill badger again.

     

    in reply to: Car numbers on the Motability Scheme today #141183
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The 3008 PHEVs charge at 3.6kW maximum so don’t plug them into a rapid charger as your car may be damaged when you return. Stick with home charging & AC charge posts.

    @gothitjulie One can add a 7.4kW Monophase on board charger for £300. Would this enable faster charging?

    It’ll allow for 2.5 hour charging instead of 5 hours, so OK on a 7kW AC public charge post or lamppost. Compare this to a BEV charging at 100kW on a DC rapid (and some rapids with an AC outlet don’t let a DC charge at the same time, hence you’d be unpopular hogging a charger for 2.5 hours for 36 miles of range when a BEV would pull enough for 100 miles in 20 minutes & be long gone). Luckily the newer CCS ultra rapid chargers don’t have a type 2 socket, and other rapid chargers often have a minimum vend price (£1.80) and a 90 minute overstay policy (£10 per 90 minutes) (45 minutes in some places and £10 per hour) to stop PHEVs hogging the chargers.

    You’ll often see PHEVs hogging 7kW AC posts in car parks, not even plugged in, just using the space for parking & blocking everyone else, and they have usually been keyed a few times in busier car parks.

     

    in reply to: Game changer all-electric Hyundai Ioniq 5 #141181
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    A Nissan Leaf has a 600 pound saving a year vs a Note diesel over 10k miles. You would need to keep your electric car an awfully long time for you to say you actually saving money.

    You’re right of course, when I worked up the figures of my e-2008 against the fossil 2008, I’d save £2,100 on fuel cost vs electric cost (allowing 15p kWh although I usually charge cheaper), so the e-2008 had to be under £2,100 cheaper than the fossil & at the time the difference was £1,800.

    However, I’m doing way more miles in the EV than I did in my previous fossil because of that fuel price difference & don’t worry about popping down the coast for the afternoon (not during lockdown), or popping over to my sister’s for a chat & a meal (allowed during lockdown using a “bubble” but I haven’t).

    So, if an EV works out cheaper on Motability than the fossil, AND you’re not doing very long journeys all the time, AND you can charge at home, you might as well go for the EV. Long journeys are possible with an EV, you just have to plan for all the charging stops and it takes a while to learn which chargers & why (Instavolt with more than 1 charger at the site is most reliable, then any other multiple charger site except Ecotricty where they will all be out of service).

    As for the Leaf 40, most new rapid chargers at CCS so no use as the car uses CHAdeMO. (CCS has become the European standard for rapid chargers and CHAdeMO isn’t always supported by new rapid installations (Ionity are CCS only)).

     

     

    in reply to: Car numbers on the Motability Scheme today #141177
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Let’s hope that things continue to improve. Especially since the bhp limit seems to be on the change, at least for PHEVs: 3008 with 300bhp giving a 0-60 of 5.8 sec. Forgive me for being pessimistic but I wonder how long that will stay on scheme!

    At a list price of close on £45k it’s more expensive than a Tesla Model 3 at £42.5k!

    The difference of course is that Motability will be given a very large discount by Peugeot as a form of fossil subsidy.

    The 3008 PHEVs charge at 3.6kW maximum so don’t plug them into a rapid charger as your car may be damaged when you return. Stick with home charging & AC charge posts.

     

     

    in reply to: On a drive to eat healthier. #141102
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I’ve been told I’m a reprobate for eating my usual breakfast of prawns.

     

    in reply to: Game changer all-electric Hyundai Ioniq 5 #141083
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Currently many car manufacturers charge a premium for their BEVs, but in the UK there is a change happening, as the Pound appreciates against the US Dollar, the Tesla becomes cheaper. At what point does a Tesla become cheaper than BEVs built in the EU, & will the EU car companies drop their prices or simply go out of business in the UK?

     

    in reply to: Large (ish) EV #140943
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The Ionic 5 is capable of towing 1600kg, enabling us to change from a PHEV to a full EV

    There’s a problem though, the EV chargers, how do you charge the car without unhitching the caravan?

    There are some chargers that would be OK, perhaps some of the Ionity chargers (Cobham Services would be OK), but most are not here in the UK. Fastned chargers in the Netherlands look OK. Need to keep an eye open for chargers that are tow accessible.

     

    in reply to: First IONIQ launch #140824
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ah yes, an 800V battery, so much faster charging as seen in the Porsche Taycan already, plus the vehicle-to-load technology means you can plug into it to power things at 240V (ish).

    A welcome step forward by Hyundai.

     

    in reply to: diesel and petrol keep going up – i need an EV #140375
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The trouble here is that we’re swapping one horribly polluting & damaging industry for another not quite so horribly polluting & damaging industry.

    Perhaps contraception is the answer.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140373
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ah, Elon Musk said it.

    Well, here you go, & it’s OK to ask when that Tesla Roadster is coming on the scheme, but you already know what the reply will be:

    https://www.edfenergy.com/for-home/energywise/electric-cars-longest-range

     

    in reply to: diesel and petrol keep going up – i need an EV #140356
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    read that and then tell me is that what you want for cornwall.

    I remember playing on a beach in Cornwall & getting covered with oil from the Torrey Canyon, I also saw the dead & dying seagulls covered in oil.

    Cornwall is already battle scarred by millenia of mining metals such as tin, copper, arsenic, and from china clay (kaolinite) extraction.

    The lithium extraction so far proposed is from hydrothermal fluids that have picked up lithium from pegmatites & so is subsurface extraction using wellheads, together with geothermal heat recovery.

    We already have copper mines scarring areas of Cornwall, North Wales & the Lake District.

    REE deposits in the UK include the Loch Loyal syenite complex which would devastate a beautiful area, the  Mourne Mountains in NI have REEs too in alluvial deposits.

    Remember too that REEs are already used as catalysts in petroleum refining & that switching from one use to another is possible.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140352
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Why would you make that guess, gothitjulie? What do you base it on?

    Based on the company’s cars that are already 3-4 years ahead… Tesla, and the way that the rest are trying to play catch up.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140350
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Yes, gothitjulie, I know about current battery technology. I was asking about the proposed use of silicon anode cells.

    From the article detailing the tests on the silicon anode cells:

    “The cells tested by INL have completed 1,000 dynamic stress test (DST) cycles following the USABC three-hour charge protocol, and over 900 DST fast charge cycles using a 4C rate or 15-minute charging protocol under 100% depth of discharge (DOD). The high-rate capable cells can be charged to 80% of their capacity in 10 minutes and to 90% of their capacity in 15 minutes. Zenlabs says its silicon anode cells enable a vehicle with a 300-mile range, and a potential battery life of up to 300,000 miles.”

    in reply to: Ford confirms strategy to go fully electric by 2030 #140301
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Indeed, Brydo, and with Jaguar moving to mainly EVs by 2025 & already having their lovely iPace on the roads is helping.

    Wigwam, yes, good point, but the increased pace in sales of BEVs has the legacy fossil manufacturers worried too, the BEV market has gone from first adopters who have put up with low ranges, to corporate fleets looking to be able to sell their secondhand cars for a reasonable amount. People were shocked when ER started throwing themselves in front of fossil cars in Central London, but if they throw themselves in front of BEVs they’ll just get laughed at.

     

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Yes, I think a power to weight ratio limit would be better than a BHP limit, you need a few extra BHP to move the larger battery around.

    Those larger wheels on the Enyaq SportLine will merely make it look prettier at the expense of range.

    in reply to: diesel and petrol keep going up – i need an EV #140297
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ian, your getting the BMW i3s made me go test drive one & hooked me on EVs as I found they were a hoot to drive compared to a nasty old fossil…. thankyou!

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140296
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    If this technology is going to be available soon combined with a decent range in the 300’s or 400’s I think it would tick every box. Of course there will still be some sceptics.

    I’d make a guess that those ranges & this battery tech will be in cars around 2025.

     

    in reply to: Faster charging batteries nearing the market #140288
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    But what will the working life of such cells be? We know fast charging reduces the life of current EV batteries.

    1000 cycles degradation detailed in those graphs, so about 82% capacity after charging from zero to 100% 1000 times, something you’d never do. Most BEVs get charged from 10-30% charge upto 80-90% on rapid chargers, the slower AC charging at home doesn’t heat up & degrade the batteries in the same way & the car slows the charge rate down to the 6 amps minimum 98-100% as it does its balance charge (where all the cells are brought upto the same SoC by supressing individual cell charge using the BMS (battery management system)).

    N.B. Most lithium batteries go bad because of BMS faults & engineers underrating the BMS to save money, but in cars they usually try better because of the higher values of such large battery packs.

    N.B. 1000 charges is about 1 per week for 20 years, 2 per week for 10 years, etc.

    N.B. The easiest way to kill a lithium battery pack is to leave it at zero charge for a few months, it won’t revive again unless you take it all apart & gently shunt some power into each cell from spare charged cells, and you’ll not be doing that as it would take an age without dedicated equipment.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by gothitjulie.
    in reply to: Ford confirms strategy to go fully electric by 2030 #140285
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    At last Ford makes the move from 2035 to 2030, finally realising that BEVs are now cutting deeply into the car markets & that many companies are already limiting their fleet to BEVs or PHEVs already.

     

    in reply to: SHOCKING EV #140234
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    What about those who also find it hard to plan a journey and have other disabilities, they may have a brain injury or mental health issues etc and not everyone’s condition is the same and combine that with not having a driveway and not being able to walk any distance.

    It may be easy to solve the planning a journey part, although there is a cost:

    1. ABRP – A Better Route Planner – It’s an app that now also works with Apple Carplay, maybe Android Auto too, although it’s only just arriving on these platforms. You tell it your start point & your destination, it then uses temperature, wind direction, live traffic data, elevations, to work out how much electricity a journey will require and suggest various places to charge on the route. You can plot routes across a continent with this using tens of chargers.

    2. Power Cruise Control – Another route planner app, but one that you connect through the car’s OBD-II port so it knows things like battery temperature as well as the outside temperature, wind direction, etc etc. It uses a graphic screen to encourage you to drive economically to complete your journey, or tells you where you can charge.

    ABRP is around £49.95 per year, which is expensive, and Power Cruise Control is around £20 per year. You’d only use these if you had trouble planning manually, or if you did a lot of driving in an EV. Some of us use such apps to “look into” the battery & ancillary gadgetry to monitor their performance in real time, but we’re really sad.

    But, the point is, there is help out there.

    https://abetterrouteplanner.com/

    https://www.powercruisecontrol.com/

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by gothitjulie.
    in reply to: Marmite or Brexit, the EV dilemma  #140154
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Any fossil you buy now is likely to have a very tired engine by 2030, and very low residual value.

     

    With the EVs you can hope for at least 70% battery capacity, with the liquid cooled batteries maybe 85%.

     

    in reply to: Marmite or Brexit, the EV dilemma  #140151
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Yes, the versions available now will be very different to the cars available in just a few years. Stellantis (PSA) are already talking about the next e-208 being electric only, based on a new electric only platform.

    Currently batteries add a lot of weight to protect the battery itself, but the aim is to integrate the battery into the structure of the car so 3 floors are no longer needed (battery base, battery top, car floor.. oh and the plastic shield under the lot). On top of that, the current batteries are made up of modules that are again protected by an outer aluminium shell. Maybe we’ll see the lower energy density Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries become more popular again as they are very difficult to get to burn (cut them in half & they still won’t ignite), the idea being that they need a lot less protection.

    in reply to: New 2021 Peugeot e-Rifter electric MPV revealed #140141
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Just that 50kWh battery again in a larger vehicle, if they put their 75kWh battery in instead then this would be worth thinking about.

    If you’re only ever going to do local miles then 50kWh would be OK, but I wonder how they’ll do a wheelchair conversion with the battery in the floor.

    The i-Cockpit is a gimmick, but is quite nice for the driver, I have it in my e-2008.

    The other worry here is the dreadful “app”, yes it sort of works to give basic info on SoC, but it’s very limited for things like charging, yes you can time the start, no you can’t tell it to only charge to 90% or tell it to stop charging at a certain time.

     

    in reply to: Peugeot pay extra for paint colour? #140138
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The basic paint & the metallic paint are covered by Motability, but not the special paints on the Peugeots, I paid £150 for the Vertigo Blue paint on my Peugeot e-2008, so I’d say it’s normal & standard price for motability customers, it’s £300 retail.

    Do I think the Vertigo Blue paint was worth it? Oh yes, it’s gorgeous.

     

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 640 total)