Would I buy An EV again???

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  • #176306 Reply
    Windy
    Participant

    Quick answer, Absolutely, based on the vehicle the experience etc. However based on the changes since purchase then the answer would be very different, let me explain.

    Early last year we did what I would call micro research into wether an EV would be an option we could both afford and benefit from. Our main issue was that it was doubtful that we would be able to get a home charger, so it was important that we could be sure of public charging availability and price. The information available to make an informed decision was interesting and complicated but the general opinion was that looking at the vehicle that suited our needs once the cost of charging exceeded 41p kWh then diesel would be a cheaper option. So the fact that BP pulse card offered at start of lease would be 15p for a fast charge went a long way toward helping the decision. This price increased to 25p before the car arrived and we didn’t actually get the card any way. 2 of the charge cards have already increased more than once and most are fast approaching the 41p cut off, one has to think that with the energy crisis this will be quickly reached. In the end long before the arrival of the car we had a home charger fitted it was non standard and we don’t have a drive , I did write some appropriately worded letters expressing my disgust at the misuse of public grants and low and behold it was fitted free of charge by whom? We just don’t know.

    so the conclusion is that armed with all the information available today and the fragility of the price of electricity, not knowing or assuming I wouldn’t get a home charger, the answer to the question would be a clear No. This would be extremely sad as the time with the EV has been brilliant and with the home charger helped our financial situation immensely. Finally what is also quite poignant is all these changes have happened in less than 9 months.

Viewing 24 replies - 1 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #176308 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Example Ford Fiesta diesel 8,000 miles realistic 50 mpg diesel @ £6.50 = £1,050

    Example Hyundia Kona Electric 8,000 realistic 3.5 kWh miles per kWh electric @ £0.41 = £937

    Not all EV are as efficient as the Kona electric i.e. Nissan leaf


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV

    #176309 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    And then we realise that a diesel driven short distances does not do 50mpg.

    And after that, we realise that nobody in their right mind pays £0.41 per kWh. Try £0.07, Octopus Go.

    Hell, even if we’d fix our rate right now, we’d still only pay £0.31. We’re currently paying £0.24 on a flexible tariff. The average price per kWh in the UK in 2021 was £0.19.

    https://www.nimblefins.co.uk/average-cost-electricity-kwh-uk#nogo

    If you use bogus numbers, you can make anything look bad. You’re also comparing a sub-compact SUV to a sub-compact hatchback.

     

     

    Current: SEAT Ateca Xcellence Lux 1.5 TSI DSG MY19
    On Order: VW Golf GTE PHEV DSG MY23

    #176310 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    Ah, that’s under the assumption that no home-charger can be used. I misunderstood that.

    Still comes out cheaper, if not by much. £0.41 is stupendously expensive, but lets not act like Diesel/Petrol isn’t gonna get more expensive as well.

    Even if we take both numbers at face value, the Kona is still more car, and still much better for short distances where a Diesel just plain sucks. Even if it’s a dinky one.

    Current: SEAT Ateca Xcellence Lux 1.5 TSI DSG MY19
    On Order: VW Golf GTE PHEV DSG MY23

    #176312 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    The heading is “Would I Buy….”.  I know Windy is talking about getting a car on the scheme, but a wider look as the general public must take has other and different considerations.  A new diesel car bought now will likely to be still be giving good service and economy in 10 years time, whereas a new EV is likely to be an economic write-off after ten years or at best have such reduced range that it becomes impractical for most users.

    #176313 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    The heading is “Would I Buy….”. I know Windy is talking about getting a car on the scheme, but a wider look as the general public must take has other and different considerations. A new diesel car bought now will likely to be still be giving good service and economy in 10 years time, whereas a new EV is likely to be an economic write-off after ten years or at best have such reduced range that it becomes impractical for most users.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV

    #176315 Reply
    Jojoe

    Something else to consider is the future tax on EV’s. Only this week a report said the loss of duty on petrol and diesel due to the shift to electric needs to be replaced with a new tax on EV’s. I’m wanting to go electric but it’s got to be affordable.

    #176316 Reply
    Mark Holland

    Rene I agree but my case was simply stating if I hadn’t got the home charger. But there are already public chargers exceeding the 41p and that’s before the April increases

    #176317 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    The heading is “Would I Buy….”. I know Windy is talking about getting a car on the scheme, but a wider look as the general public must take has other and different considerations. A new diesel car bought now will likely to be still be giving good service and economy in 10 years time, whereas a new EV is likely to be an economic write-off after ten years or at best have such reduced range that it becomes impractical for most users.

    Not sure what went wrong with my last post ?

    Not everyone is fortunate to be on Octopus Go, have their own drive or ability to have a home charger be it a Podpoint or 3 pin plug, apart from free charging point at Tesco, they will have to use commercially charging point no doubt these will also increase.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV

    #176318 Reply
    Windy
    Participant

    Oscarmax when I did the initial research there were chargers at 60p kWh admittedly no where near me and certainly would never been used by me but now if there had been any doubt about the hone charger I just don’t think I would have taken the risk. My car only achieves between 2.4 and 3.1 kWh so it would quickly become expensive on the public system

    #176319 Reply
    Windy
    Participant

    I suppose we have to hope that an end to the rise in wholesale gas and electricity will end the increases eventually. unfortunately I doubt the price will come down things rarely do and no doubt oil will find a new high. I am pleased I have my EV and without doubt will have another although this one will definitely be extended. I just worry for those who cannot charge cheaply at home the KWh price once the new tariffs hit in the spring will be very high

    #176320 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Example Ford Fiesta diesel 8,000 miles realistic 50 mpg diesel @ £6.50 = £1,050 Example Hyundia Kona Electric 8,000 realistic 3.5 kWh miles per kWh electric @ £0.41 = £937 Not all EV are as efficient as the Kona electric i.e. Nissan leaf

    Windy

    Oscarmax when I did the initial research there were chargers at 60p kWh admittedly no where near me and certainly would never been used by me but now if there had been any doubt about the hone charger I just don’t think I would have taken the risk. My car only achieves between 2.4 and 3.1 kWh so it would quickly become expensive on the public system

    8000 mile @ 2.4 kWh using  Gridserve 39 p kW = £1,300, @ the higher 3.1 kWh = £1,006


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV

    #176325 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Interesting comments.  Many assumptions. Each to their own. Electric will work for many but not all.

    #176326 Reply
    Ian

    For me absolutely would go Ev again but recognise that it’s not for all.

    I have the benefits of a home charger and off street parking, journeys which suit my Evs range and cheap tariff electricity (+solar).

    Remove any of the above and the choice would be more difficult.

     

    #176327 Reply
    Brydo

    The options to go anything other than EV are and will get fewer and fewer. The option of a diesel will all but disappear over the next few years limiting choices still further.

    Nobody knows what will happen in the energy market over the next year or so but I think the price of electricity will continue to rise as demand increases for EVs.

    It could however be exacerbated by the government moving to a “pay per mile” approach to recovering tax lost due to the move from fossil fuel. I can see a situation arising where electricity is expensive and on top the pay per mile option is introduced which could make it very expensive for many drivers to get out and about. There will be calls to reduce the cost of pay per mile charge’s for the disabled so hopefully that would be introduced but there’s no guarantee.

    To offset all the above costs is the very real prospect of BEVs being up to 25% cheaper  to manufacture, over the next few years, than at present.

    #176328 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    The financial benefits of going electric are starting to be eroded, higher electricity prices, fewer “free” chargers, reduced grants etc. By 2030 I suspect the gap will be narrower. For those able to have a home charger and take advantage of overnight tariffs, the savings are huge. As a Motability customer electric makes sense, as a private buyer I am not so sure. There is also a lot of nonsense on the TV about the pitfalls of BEV´s which show a lack of research, especially regarding charging.

    #176329 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    The options to go anything other than EV are and will get fewer and fewer. The option of a diesel will all but disappear over the next few years limiting choices still further. Nobody knows what will happen in the energy market over the next year or so but I think the price of electricity will continue to rise as demand increases for EVs. It could however be exacerbated by the government moving to a “pay per mile” approach to recovering tax lost due to the move from fossil fuel. I can see a situation arising where electricity is expensive and on top the pay per mile option is introduced which could make it very expensive for many drivers to get out and about. There will be calls to reduce the cost of pay per mile charge’s for the disabled so hopefully that would be introduced but there’s no guarantee. To offset all the above costs is the very real prospect of BEVs being up to 25% cheaper to manufacture, over the next few years, than at present.

    I recall Video recorders were aroung 799 when first launced, falling to under a ton and Plasma Tvs 4999, down by 80% in a couple of years so hopefully a 40k BEV will be nearer 30K in 2 or 3 years.

    #176330 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    The problem that can not be solved is that if the current level of car ownership is maintained and everyone goes electric, there will never be sufficient charging points, nor grid capacity.  But then, the intention is that there will in future be far fewer cars.

    #176331 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Sources in the industry say 2030 us unrealistic.  Expect an announcement delaying. What’s the point of the UK going carbon neutral if the biggest economies delay to 2060.

    #176332 Reply
    Windy
    Participant

    fwippers the problem with comparing EV to video recorders etc is that we treat them in this country akin to property with a realistic recorded and predicted residual value running and financing a huge used vehicle market.

    that leads me to believe we are more likely to see new prices stagnate than decrease. In fact I would sense the increase of ICe vehicles toward the EV with a minor drop in price of the EV.
    The cost of both new and used vehicles today is often ignored when reduced to a monthly payment either affordable or not affordable regardless of vehicle.

    #176334 Reply
    Elliot
    Participant

    It’s obvious that the Government will come up with a tax to claw back the duty they will be losing on petrol and diesel. It won’t be any cheaper in the future to drive electric compared with petrol and diesel today. I can see that tax being a charge per mile rather than a tax on electricity.

    #176335 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    It is going to be one hell of a balancing act ?


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV

    #176340 Reply
    struth
    Participant

    this is a question that would be better answered in a year or two. ive no issue really with the car so far, barring a fault at moment, but prices may turn it into a white elephant for many. my mileage is low so it wont impact me so much hopefully. but it will be a shame if the advantages of evs are washed away this year, as people will just not buy into it anymore.

    im also betting that govt will back off on the 2030 date

    Current Car: Hyundai Kona Premium EV...2 way 40kg hoist
    Last Car: Toyota C-HR Excel Hybrid...4 way 80kg hoist

    #176347 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    The Government is in a difficult position trying to encourage the use of EVs whilst collecting enough money to run the economy. The speed of introduction of electric cars has caught them on the hop with many more being bought than predicted. As a result something has to be done, and quickly, to fill the widening financial gap. My worry is that they introduce some half ar$ed, not thought out properly, stop gap measure that punishes many who cant afford the extra cost. On the face of it  “charge per mile” is the fairest of all the options on the table, as taxing electricity at source would be difficult at this time, but maybe not in the future as tech will no doubt continue to improve and distinguish between energy used in the house and that going into the car.


    @struth
    i don’t think 2030 will be missed as many manufacturers are going full EV from 2025 onwards but if it is missed it won’t be by much and in the grand scheme of things a year or two won’t make too much difference.

    With regard to the grid and the number of EVs the grid can accommodate i don’t think there will be a problem in the short term. The real problem for the grid is when we move from gas central heating to electric. At this point the demand for electricity will go through the roof and we will certainly need additional production to make up the shortfall, Small Nuclear Power Reactors anyon?

    http://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/nuclear-fuel-cycle/nuclear-power-reactors/small-nuclear-power-reactors.aspx

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #176348 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

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