Three-year V2G trial reports large savings for drivers

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  • #158174 Reply
    Brydo

    A three-year trial of vehicle-to-grid charging has demonstrated that domestic users could offset most of their annual energy bills by using the technology.

    Claimed to be the world’s largest domestic V2G trial, Project Sciurus was led by OVO Energy and funded by the Office for Zero Emission Vehicles (OZEV) and Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with Nissan, Kaluza and Indra as partners.

    The project equipped 320 homes with V2G chargers, which enable energy stored in the vehicle’s battery to be sold back to the grid during periods of peak demand. This could either be during pre-approved times, or a dynamic service which responds to spikes in usage.

    Data gathered during the 2020 calendar year highlighted significant savings for end-users. Just switching to a smart charging point (which can automatically manage the energy it draws) could save £120 compared to not optimising the charging routine. Drivers selling energy at set times could receive £513 in return, rising to £725 for those supporting Dynamic Containment. That’s in line with UK-wide average household energy bills of £707 in 2020, according to BEIS data.

    In its concluding report, Cenex advised that additional funding should be provided for V2G chargers to encourage drivers to adopt them – these cost around £3,700 more than the smart chargers funded by government grants. At £1,000, the incremental cost versus an unmanaged charger could be recovered in five years just by optimising a charging tariff, and not selling energy back to the grid. National Grid ESO, which is responsible for the transmission network, expects 45% of UK cars will be using V2G chargers by 2050.

    Users also said they felt it was important to have the capability on their next electric vehicle. At present, this is only supported by the CHAdeMO standard, which includes the required communication protocol for the charger to exchange battery data with the vehicle. The CCS standard, used by most new vehicles sold in Europe, does not support V2G yet, though this is under development.

    The trial offset requirements for an additional 750MWh of energy generation during its three-year term, suggesting the technology could avoid expensive grid upgrades as a greater share of the UK vehicle parc switches to electric or plug-in hybrid powertrains.

    Chris Russell, managing director OVO Drive, OVO Energy, said: “Over the past couple of years we’ve enabled our members to store energy in their cars, use that to power their homes and to sell energy back to the grid at peak times, ultimately allowing our members to earn rewards from smart charging their electric vehicle. We hope this trial acts as a blueprint for wider adoption to ensure we collectively unlock the huge environmental opportunity that electric vehicles offer.”

Viewing 13 replies - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #158178 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Interesting but peak use of electricity in the uk is between 4pm and 7pm (according to what Google tells me). In an EV world, isn’t that the time that most people (and their cars) will be at work or coming home or arriving home with a depleted battery?  I don’t see much of an opportunity to sell power back to the grid then. Even expanding peak time to broader daytime hours, most people will be parked up somewhere away from home. The only time there is some certainty most EVs will be hooked up is at night when electricity is available cheaply.

    #158180 Reply
    joss
    Moderator

    Of course there are those EV owners who might work from home, or like so many of us, would be at home in those peak hours. However,even then, very much in the minority to sell power back in peak hours.

    Joss
    ***🌻🌻🌻 ***
    Current car BMW X2 2.0i Sport sDrive Auto 2019 with Sport pack
    Last car Ford Focus Titanium 1.5 TDCI
    Builder of Gaming PC's

    #158181 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Another point is that according to Britishvolt modern EV battery packs are designed to last up to 1500-2000 charge cycles. Taking the maximum figure and using the car every day to take power from the grid at night and return it during the day, the battery will only last 5 years, and that’s before you use the car for its intended purpose!

    #158182 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    And then there are conversion losses. Nearly 10% of energy is lost getting it from the house to the car. Assuming the same conversion loss getting it back to the house, that’s 20% of this precious electricity wasted.  More I think, the less I can see it being a practical proposition.  But then I’m not a highly paid expert with a vested interest in selling electricity and associated kit.

    #158213 Reply
    Brydo

    If most people, and their cars, are at work or on the way home who’s using all the electricity lol.

    Below is a table showing the efficiency of various power plants, these figures are for production of electricity only. We can argue about these figures but the important thing to note is that losses are encountered every where with regard to producing electricity, so getting bogged down on the odd 10% here and there is pointless. The main point is that without V2G chargers it will cost the Government (i.e us) Billions to provide subsidies to energy providers to store the electricity generated for use when we need it.

    Taking small amounts of electricity from a BEV does not count as a cycle, we are talking a few KWh from millions of car batteries.

    #158215 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    I know it’s a favourite topic of yours, but I’ll file it away under ‘never going to happen’ Brydo…

    #158224 Reply
    Brydo

    You could be right wigwam but IMHO the EV revolution will take many years more without V2G

    #158225 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    I’m all for that Brydo.

    #158308 Reply
    Ian

    Vehicle to grid I hope will happen, a glorious opportunity to balance electricity usage without having to switch on the fossil fuelled  power stations.

    I do wonder of the impact on the battery vehicles ie 40k car providing a few pounds worth of electricity to the home, would it impact battery, vehicle warranty, battery performance etc.

     

    #158865 Reply
    Brydo

    V2G project BDL starts field trial with 50 BMW i3

    In Germany, the announced field trial with 50 BMW i3s converted for V2G has now begun for the research project ‘Bidirectional charging management – BDL’ that was launched in 2019. As of a few days ago, 20 of the BMW i3s are now in customer hands, and the remaining 30 will soon be handed over to commercial users.

    In the field trial, private and fleet customers with the compact cars will now be equipped with regenerative capability, suitable charging hardware and associated digital services in order to test the benefits and user-friendliness of the solutions developed so far in the course of the project under real conditions. According to the initiators, the practical test run should create the basis for later series and area-wide use of the technology to integrate electromobility into the German power grid. The project was originally scheduled to start at the beginning of 2021 and run for one year. It is not clear from the company’s latest statement on the project whether the duration will be shortened as a result of the delayed start.

    Participants – including BMW subsidiary Alphabet as a fleet customer – will receive the aforementioned vehicles with corresponding technology on board, as well as intelligent wallboxes from Kostal and the networking of electric vehicle and wallbox and domestic electrical installation with the power grid. The first function that customers will be able to experience will be the optimisation of their own consumption from the electricity generated by their own photovoltaic system. In the second stage, vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functions will be added, which will allow customers to participate in new business models for energy trading and power grid stabilization. In a third stage, companies with electric vehicle fleets would be added. These will use the vehicles as short-term storage to avoid power demand peaks occurring in the daily load profile.

    Companies and institutions from the automotive industry, energy sector and science research have been involved in Bidirectional Charging Management – BDL since 2019. Their goal is to link vehicles, charging infrastructure and power grids in a holistic approach in such a way that the most extensive possible use of regeneratively generated energy is promoted while at the same time increasing supply security.

    The project is funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy under the auspices of the German Aerospace Center (DLR). According to the schedule, the project will run for three years and, in addition to regenerative systems for vehicles and wallboxes, will also develop technologies for energy management systems as well as hardware and software for controlling charging processes. The project will also evaluate legal and regulatory framework conditions.

    With bidirectional charging, the batteries in electric cars can not only draw power from the grid but also feed power back into the grid – assuming a charging station is designed for this purpose. This is a big difference from another project that BMW is pursuing together with grid operator TenneT: Smart charging control can be used to temporarily reduce the charging power of electric cars from outside the grid. This can help to absorb peak loads. Here, however, no energy is fed back into the grid. The advantage is that no special charging station is needed, the car communicates directly with the grid operator.

    With bidirectional charging such as in the BDL project, if as many electric cars as possible are integrated into the power grid in this way, they can act as mobile energy storage units to help absorb peak loads and stabilize the power grid – since they can also feed energy back into the grid, the effect is significantly greater than with pure load management. At the same time, volatile renewable energies such as solar and wind power can also be used to the maximum.

    In individual cases, the integration of electric cars into the power grid as primary control energy has already been successful. However, according to BMW, integrating as many electric vehicles as possible into the power grid requires “a wide range of innovations in the areas of vehicle technology, charging hardware, charging management and communication interfaces to energy industry stakeholders, as well as with regard to legal framework conditions.”

    These are being developed as part of the research project that in addition to consortium leader BMW Group, also involves Kostal Industrie Elektrik GmbH (development of charging hardware), transmission system operator TenneT, distribution system operator Bayernwerk Netz GmbH, (both specialised in energy system services), Forschungsstelle für Energiewirtschaft e.V. (FfE) and the Forschungsgesellschaft für Energiewirtschaft mbH (both specialised in energy system analysis), the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT focussing on research on electricity market and grid feedback), and the University of Passau (user research).

    Reporting by Cora Werwitzke

    #158992 Reply
    brydo

    There are a handful of EVs that have a three pin outlet in the car, you can charge another car from, if you had a week and a half to spare lol or charge your scooter, boil a kettle, watch the TV, make a toasty etc if away for the day.

    #159028 Reply
    joss
    Moderator

    OO-er you could daisy chain in convoy style 🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗🚗

    Joss
    ***🌻🌻🌻 ***
    Current car BMW X2 2.0i Sport sDrive Auto 2019 with Sport pack
    Last car Ford Focus Titanium 1.5 TDCI
    Builder of Gaming PC's

    #159178 Reply
    Brydo

    The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has today (June 20) issued a call for evidence to better understand the role of vehicle-to-x (V2X) technologies in the transition to net zero.

    V2X is an umbrella term for technologies that allow an electric vehicle (EV) to export the energy in its battery for another use, including vehicle-to-grid, vehicle-to-home and vehicle-to-business.

    Although V2X has been technically feasible for over a decade, the challenge has been to realise a viable commercial model, according to the call for evidence.

    However, with V2X having the potential to be one of the main sources of flexibility available for the energy system and the benefits of V2X looking “very promising”, it is therefore essential for the government to understand how these technologies will come to mass market. This includes timeframes, barriers and possible opportunities to bring these timetables forward, BEIS said.

    There are two value streams for V2X, the first using V2X technology as part of the building’s energy management, helping to avoid periods of high electricity prices, provide additional resilience and maximise use of intermittent generation.

    The other value stream pertains to business models that export to the electric grid, adding additional revenue streams to the behind-the-meter models through providing grid services and price arbitrage, which is commonly done through an aggregator.

    BEIS said that research has suggested that without providing grid services the majority of behind-the-meter value from V2X energy technologies could be provided by smart charging alone without the need for the cost of V2X equipment. However, the V2X business case may still stack up for fleets.

    A review of nine European V2G projects in 2020 by Cenex found that the traditional model for V2G of generating revenue through energy trading is only one of a number of opportunities for the technology, with other key value propositions being resilience, the benefits to society, enhanced battery management and self sufficiency.

    BEIS is asking for responses on what the potential business models for V2X energy technologies will be in the future energy system, how government and industry can enable and incentivise consumers to realise the full value, when and how V2X will be deployed, the role the technologies will play and how they might interact with other flexibility technologies.

    A further key area BEIS is seeking views on is barriers to V2X, having identified a selection of potential barriers from InnovateUK competitions and from its literature review. These include the limited choice of vehicle models capable of V2X, the impact of V2X on battery health, the low levels of cars being plugged in and available for V2X when stationary, ensuring V2X can compete within markets on an equal basis and a poor business case for domestic aggregators.

    The three-year Project Sciurus – run by OVO Energy, Cenex, Nissan and Indra – recently found that while costs of V2G hardware have come down significantly, they are still too high both for most consumers and for the financial business case to stack up for the operator.

    However, Sciurus also found that participants’ initial concerns over battery degradation, reliability and costs were alleviated over the course of the trial.

    BEIS is looking for responses on whether the barriers identified are indeed barriers and if there are any missing, which barriers require government intervention and what they should look like, what action industry should take and where future innovation funding should be focused to best aid the development and deployment of V2X technologies.

    The call for evidence comes alongside the publication of the updated Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan and Energy Digitalisation Strategy alongside plans for a new independent Future System Operator.

    The next webinar in the Current± Briefings series is to delve into the potential of V2G for frequency response, and is to take place at 10am BST on 21 July 2021. To register for the event, click here.

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