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  • #269841
    Glos Guy
    Participant

      As mentioned on the lease extensions thread, our new car order window opens in 4 weeks time. We currently have a 2021 BMW X1 2.0i petrol auto 4WD X-Line, which has been the best car that we’ve had on Motability (after a succession of VW Tiguans). Other than the lack of AutoHold and slightly excessive road noise on coarse surfaces, it’s been nigh on perfect. I’m not a huge fan of lease extensions (but will consider some extension in this case) and I’m open to leaving the scheme and buying privately if we can’t find anything suitable. We would ideally like another petrol car, second choice would be a PHEV and last choice would be an EV. We don’t want a diesel.

      Today, after a nice lunch in Cheltenham, we spent some time at the massive 2 storey Cotswold BMW dealership that only opened a couple of years ago. My first choice manufacturer would be BMW (having had loads of different cars and driven hundreds of others they are my preferred make by some margin) and we went with the intention of looking at 6 different cars. Sadly, we had to rule out 5 of them.

      1) BMW 225e Grand Tourer M-Sport PHEV (currently on Motability). I’m afraid that we discounted this on looks alone. MPVs just don’t do it for us. My late Dad had an MPV and as Jeremy Clarkson says, MPVs are for old people who’ve given up on liking cars (which, in fairness, was my Dad! Neither of us liked the look of it and I know I’d regret getting one. The boot may also be a bit too small for the wheelchair, but we didn’t get that far.

      2) BMW X2. Not yet on Motability, but I reckon that the iX2 is very likely to join the scheme fairly soon. We ruled this out as the rear passenger compartment is far too difficult to get in and out of due to the sloped roof. I’m 6ft 2 and in all honesty it was a real challenge getting in and out. I had to bend my head right down on to my chest to get in and out and it was uncomfortable doing so. I would concur with the reviews I have read on the X2 that, other than looks, it is compromised against the better packaged X1 / iX1.

      3) BMW i4 (on Motability). They had a green Sport e35 which we thought looked lovely (the green looked fabulous under the showroom lights). The boot was big enough for the wheelchair, but as the rear of the car is sloped there wasn’t much space left. Getting in and out of the back seats was also a bit of a challenge due to the sloped roofline, but less difficult than the X2. We ended up dismissing it for 2 reasons. First and foremost, with the lower seating position my wife really struggled getting out of it, as she had to pull herself up more than she does from an SUV, and this was a major problem for her. The other reason was that we felt that the car seemed claustrophobic inside. Forward and rear visibility through the comparatively shallow windscreen and rear window felt very restricted compared to what we are used to. The windscreen almost felt as though the sun blinds were down (they weren’t). Shame as we both really liked the look of it, but it’s just not practical for either of us.

      4) BMW 3 Series Touring. When the 330e M-Sport Touring came on to Motability a few months ago, it was the first addition to excite me in several years. I had already established the biggest negative with this car, when I’d worked out the cost of all the options that I’d want to add (which makes it ludicrously expensive for a lease car, especially when added to the £12,000 sacrificed benefits). Whilst it wasn’t as claustrophobic as the i4, my wife really struggled getting out of it so, whilst we liked it, we had to eliminate it.

      5) BMW X5. This would obviously be a private purchase, probably a 3 year old one as I just can’t bring myself to part with £70k for a car. Much as I’d love one, and as a car it left all the others in the shade, it was impractical for two reasons. Whereas the i4 and 3 Series were too low for my wife to get out of, the X5 was too high for her to get in to. Also, the side sills on M-Sport models protrude and were problematic for my wife as they make it a bigger gap to reach the seat and also result in soiling your legs from road dirt. Finally, the daft split tailgate would be a nightmare getting the wheelchair in and out of the boot, involving too much of a stretch (not good for my back). Alas, I don’t think I’ll ever get my X5 😔

      6) BMW iX1. They didn’t have an iX1 in the showroom but they had an identical petrol X1. This was the easiest car for my wife to get in and out of (no doubt because it’s closest to our current car), but it was also the easiest for me. The boot is fine for the wheelchair and, other than the bigger X5, it was the best car for visibility. I don’t like the fact that the iDrive rotary dial has gone, but at least they have fitted AutoHold on the new model. Almost 3 years on, it’s the one thing on our current X1 that still irritates me (as it doesn’t have it). This ended up being the best car for both of us, but unfortunately only the iX1 EV is on Motability at present. I had an iX1 30e X-Line for a day last year and didn’t like it anywhere near as much as our petrol X1. Ideally I’d like to see the petrol X1 on the scheme, but with how Motabilty is going, I suspect that it won’t. However, there are now two X1 PHEV models so, with the more expensive 330e having joined the scheme, I am hoping that one of them might join next quarter. However, there’s no EV equivalent of the 3 Series Touring, whereas BMW will want to use Motability to get their EV numbers up so will want to shift the iX1 as a priority.

      So, as far as BMW goes, if we stay with Motability we will hope for the X1 PHEV and if that doesn’t happen, and we don’t find a better car from another manufacturer, we may end up having to go for an iX1 20e M-Sport, which you can get through Motability with the tech pack and M-Sport Pro packs included. I’d considered an X3 as a private purchase, but it’s no bigger inside than the new X1/iX1 so that doesn’t really make sense. So, in some respects, a frustrating day, but at least it’s helped narrow the BMW choice down to one car.

      Next steps are to look at the Hyundai Tucson Ultimate PHEV (not sure I want to spend that much for a Hyundai though) and the Mazda CX-60, although I’ll wait to see if that’s still on the list in Q2 before making a trip as there isn’t a Mazda dealer anywhere near us. My wife has a prejudice against all French cars (🙄) and isn’t at all keen on a Skoda, even though I think they make some excellent cars now. The new Kuga won’t be any good as the Vignale is discontinued and you can’t get leather trim on the ST-Line X (she needs leather or faux leather to slide around on the seat). The new VW Tiguan still doesn’t have leather unless you pay over £2k which is outrageous (no faux leather option).

    Viewing 25 replies - 51 through 75 (of 123 total)
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    • #271338
      Glos Guy
      Participant

        @Glos Guy Very frustrating for you. To be fair Kezo’s suggestion of the Cupra Formentor PHEV is a good one, about the same height as the X1, but unlikely to have the same interior quality. I just don’t think you will like the way the Tucson drives. Ignoring for the moment that you don’t feel ready for an EV, it may be worth knowing the the iX1 30 is now available on the scheme with the 309 BHP motor, albeit in X Line trim. One of your reservations of the 20 model was perhaps a lack of performance. EV range requires a slightly different mindset. How often do you cover more than 200 miles in a day? Would you ever need to plan a longer journey which requires using a public charger. If you did, would it really be such a chore to plan ahead and use the BMW satnav or a charger app to tell you where the convenient chargers are located en route and whether they are working or in use? The BMW satnav even suggests where to stop and what % you will have left when you get there! Don’t think of it as “filling up” like in an ICE car. Think how many miles am I likely to do in the next few days. Right I’ll charge to 80% and that’ll give me 180 miles. We’ve had our i4 a month and I’ve only charged it 3 times, and then only to add about 40% to keep it topped up Maybe it’s time to disavow yourself of your current reservations? I say this as someone who had no intention of getting an EV before the i4 appeared on the scheme. Food for thought 🙂 <p style=”text-align: center;”></p>

        Thanks. All good points. I certainly wouldn’t entertain the Tucson until I’ve driven the PHEV model for at least half a day. I’ve never chosen a car based on any less test time than that, as it’s a recipe for disaster! Out of interest, why don’t you think I’ll like the way it drives? It would be useful to know so that I can look out for those specific aspects. I’ve watched a number of detailed YouTube videos on the facelifted Tucson and the revised interior and, in particular, the infotainment look very good. I’m still not 100% on the exterior, but it looks better in dark colours.

        Although I have been called ‘anti EV’ by one or two who are incapable of reasoned debate (and take the stance that their view is the only view, and everyone else is just stupid or a dinosaur), I am open to the idea of one, in spite of my reservations. My wife (the benefit recipient) is less so. I’ve only driven one EV, but it was the iX1 30e X-Line (the only 30e that’s on the scheme). I had it for a whole day and I just didn’t like it and was glad to get back in my petrol X1. Yes it was quick, but if you drove it in the slightest bit ‘keenly’ the range just plummeted, considerably more so than would be the case in a petrol car. I also didn’t like the driving characteristics compared to a petrol car, especially the regenerative braking. Then, of course, there’s the further degradation of range in the winter which, again, is far more than is the case in a petrol car. All these things will no doubt be resolved over time as technology improves, but I see the current situation as being too many compromises for my liking, compared to what I am used to..

        It is indeed true that 95% plus of our journeys would present no problem with an EV in terms of the range, but moving to a car with a realistic range of 200 miles when our current car has three times that range is a leap of faith. We do go on a lot of holidays, probably once every few months, and each of these require journeys that would require charging en-route. I know that people say that ‘you just charge when you stop for a coffee’, well, we don’t stop for a coffee! At most it’s a 10 minute loo stop. So that would result in us making stops that we otherwise don’t need to make. My wife has concerns that charge points might not be available. I don’t, in spite of some of the scare stories. However, motorway service stations are expensive and just as I would never fill up with petrol at one (and never need to due to the 600 mile range) I don’t fancy the idea of charging at them. Neither do I wish to divert off the motorway just to charge a car, stopping at places that I have no desire to stop at. By contrast, if I need petrol I just keep an eye on prices as I drive past garages and when I see a cheap one I stop and fill up. In and out in 5 minutes. Done. As mentioned previously, I appreciate that EVs are cheaper to run as long as you can charge at home (which we can) but I prioritise convenience over cost.

        Just as I have a good relationship with a salesperson at Hyundai, I also know an excellent salesperson at BMW whom I have also used for both Motability and private purchases. She arranged the iX1 30e for me last year. She’s due to call me this month so I’m going to ask her to provide me with a iX1 20e, preferably an M-Sport, as that’s what I’d get. As we are now down to just 2 cars, I certainly will not rule it out without driving one.

        Who knows, I might just fall in love with it! Having driven hundreds of cars of most makes, BMWs certainly suit me the best and I will be sorry to see our X1 go. It’s the smallest BMW I’ve ever had, but has been nigh on perfect for our needs. Comparing against the Hyundai will indeed be interesting, so please let me know what I should be looking out for. Thanks.

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Glos Guy.
        #271346
        vinalspin
        Participant

          There is always the option of a 6 month old Approved Used X1, unless you absolutely must have a brand new plate on your car then you could have a virtually new low mileage version of what you have now with a huge saving on buying new.

          Wifey can get in/out and already likes the X1, happy wife = happy life! 😁

          #271351
          indecisiveone
          Participant

            GG – did you have a look at the ionic 5 whilst there, out of curiosity ?

            #271356
            comfortablynumb2
            Participant

              @glos-guy

              I mean this in the best possible taste.

              Having read this thread and other posts of yours over the years, it is quite remarkable the dedication you show to sourcing a motor vehicle. You really are a petrol-head of the highest order and in addition, your jousting with the BEV-heads on this forum is also entertaining, informative and needed.

              I know my opinion is of no consequence but here it is anyway:

              BMW

              I wish you and your wife well in your search.

              #271361
              72 dudes
              Participant

                @Glos Guy

                Re the Hyundai, I’m only going off the reviews I’ve seen and read. It’s criticised for having an unsettled ride, over light steering and lack of driver involvement. Strangely the Sportage seems to drive better and have a smoother ride. In my view it looks a lot better too!

                This may be fine for the majority of people but I like cars to involve some element of fun, or at least satisfaction. I can’t get over that driving a Korean car is like driving White Goods around, i.e. perfectly capable but anodyne. We once hired a Kona when we holidayed in Northern Ireland and it was okay but ….. Yawn 😆

                As you say, you’re going to drive both extensively before making a decision and if the iX1 is just not for you, then fair enough. I do agree that it’s a major failure taking out the iDrive controller from between the seats. I love using this in the i4.

                #271362
                MFillingham
                Participant

                  There is always the option of a 6 month old Approved Used X1, unless you absolutely must have a brand new plate on your car then you could have a virtually new low mileage version of what you have now with a huge saving on buying new. Wifey can get in/out and already likes the X1, happy wife = happy life! 😁

                   

                  I was thinking about a similar response as this.  There are nearly new ones about that’ll save you that ‘drive it off the forecourt tax’ and will still get you the car you’re most comfortable with, just without spending a huge amount on a rapidly depreciating asset.

                  That said, with a potential (likely?) change in government I’d hold off buying anything.  There may be a huge push towards electric cars which might impact ownership of any car in the short term.  It’s a questionably risky expense right now.

                  I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                  I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                  Mark

                  #271365
                  Glos Guy
                  Participant

                    There is always the option of a 6 month old Approved Used X1, unless you absolutely must have a brand new plate on your car then you could have a virtually new low mileage version of what you have now with a huge saving on buying new. Wifey can get in/out and already likes the X1, happy wife = happy life! 😁

                    Yes that could be an option. Not worried about brand new. A new car is only new for a few months anyway! My wife just doesn’t seem keen on me buying a car when we can get one on the scheme, even though we have to make compromises and the numbers aren’t as heavily skewed towards Motability for us as we live in a low risk insurance area 🤔

                    #271366
                    Glos Guy
                    Participant

                      GG – did you have a look at the ionic 5 whilst there, out of curiosity ?

                      There wasn’t one in the showroom, just an Ioniq 6. In all honesty I don’t like the look of the Ioniq, inside or out, but if we do decide to go down the EV route I might take a look.

                      #271367
                      Glos Guy
                      Participant

                        @glos-guy I mean this in the best possible taste. Having read this thread and other posts of yours over the years, it is quite remarkable the dedication you show to sourcing a motor vehicle. You really are a petrol-head of the highest order and in addition, your jousting with the BEV-heads on this forum is also entertaining, informative and needed. I know my opinion is of no consequence but here it is anyway: BMW I wish you and your wife well in your search.

                        👍😂 I enjoyed reading that. Thanks.

                        #271368
                        MFillingham
                        Participant

                          I’d have a check on insurance prices first, there’s a lot that have gone up considerably.  I’d hate for that to be an unpleasant shock for anyone.

                          I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                          I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                          Mark

                          #271370
                          Glos Guy
                          Participant

                            I’d have a check on insurance prices first, there’s a lot that have gone up considerably. I’d hate for that to be an unpleasant shock for anyone.

                            Unfortunately I’m down to just 2 years NCD having had a minor prang when we first got our current car (first claim in over 20 years) but even with that irritant I ran quotes on a 3 year old BMW X5 45e (almost 400bhp) and a new Porsche Macan S and both were around £850 which pleasantly surprised me, especially as my NCD starts to build up again. As I say we live in a low risk area and the car is garaged. Since then we are now looking at much cheaper / less risk cars so the quotes will be much less.

                            • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Glos Guy.
                            #271380
                            vinalspin
                            Participant

                              There is always the option of a 6 month old Approved Used X1, unless you absolutely must have a brand new plate on your car then you could have a virtually new low mileage version of what you have now with a huge saving on buying new. Wifey can get in/out and already likes the X1, happy wife = happy life! 😁

                              Yes that could be an option. Not worried about brand new. A new car is only new for a few months anyway! My wife just doesn’t seem keen on me buying a car when we can get one on the scheme, even though we have to make compromises and the numbers aren’t as heavily skewed towards Motability for us as we live in a low risk insurance area 🤔

                              If the wife is wanting to do the motability thing then tell her she can pay you with her allowance on a monthly basis for 3 years! 👍

                              #271381
                              MFillingham
                              Participant

                                @Glos_Guy from what I’ve seen of your requirements I’d say the Ioniq 5 would be a huge mistake.  It’s a fantastic car, comfortable and easy going to drive but a driver’s car it isn’t.  The steering is definitely by wire and the suspension is for comfort not speed.  Put your foot down and you know you’re in a 2 tonne car, it’s quick enough but corners not do well at speed.  If you don’t turn lane assist off it’ll try to kill you on quick corners.  I’ve tried nipping around the Cornish B roads and it’s been a challenge at times, you need to be a tad slower than ideal but it is capable enough for most.

                                As I said, it’s a comfortable cruiser, best plodding through the motorway miles, which it’ll do for fun for hours and then recharge in a hurry ready to go again quite quickly.

                                From what I’ve read you’d benefit from more feedback and a bit of fun, even if you spend most of your time tootling around town.  The 5 isn’t a fun speedster, I’ve been left behind by several X3s,5s and even an iX1. When I get back on straight roads I can catch up again but the bendy bits are less engaging.

                                I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                Mark

                                #271403
                                Glos Guy
                                Participant

                                  @MFillingham Thanks Mark. It sounds as though the Ioniq isn’t for me then!

                                  Can I take this opportunity to thank everyone who has contributed so far. The responses have been very helpful.

                                  Now that we are down to just 2 cars (one BEV, the BMW iX1 20e M-Sport with Technology Plus Pack £6,249 AP and one PHEV, the Hyundai Tucson Ultimate £4,599 AP). I have been chatting through the pros and cons of both cars with my wife. I have also been reflecting on the excellent challenge by @72_dudes and had a few lightbulb moments.

                                  It’s dawned on me that I will have to be charging both these cars, but the PHEV will need charging after every single use (and I’m staggered at how long it takes via a 3-pin plug to achieve just 30 or so miles) whereas the BEV won’t. Long journeys aside, I will probably only need to charge it once a week (also at home).

                                  95% of our journeys are well within even the realistic range of 200 miles (as opposed to stated range of 267-293 miles) that the iX1 achieves. Around 6 times a year we do a round trip of around 220 miles, which might be just over. I’ve been thinking along the lines of not wanting to make a 20-30 minute charging stop, but presumably could just do a quick 10 minute charge if we stop for a pee? That way we’d probably have enough charge to complete the round trip. I do a few even longer journeys, probably one every few months, and charging stops on those would be a pain, but I guess I could also use the ‘splash and dash’ approach at pee stops rather than doing full charges?

                                  Can I please ask those of you with BEVs (and @kezo, who I know is well informed on these things) the following dumb arse questions, given my lack of knowledge on these things (most conversations about BEVs and charging sound like Swahili to me)?

                                  1) Are very quick ‘splash and dash’ charges (as described above) viable? What sort of extra range can I expect to get in 10 minutes max?

                                  2) If I charge a BEV (or a PHEV for that matter) to 100% on one day and then don’t use the car for say another 3 days (as occasionally happens) – or for a week or two if on holiday – when I go back to the car will it still be at 100%? I’ve never thought about this issue, but a review of the Mazda CX-60 suggested that the 100% dropped to as low as 80% after a few days if the car wasn’t used. Is that a thing, or a fault with the CX-60?

                                  3) Whilst running costs aren’t terribly high on my list of priorities, I’d be interested to know how the costs would compare to our current petrol car. I’ve tried working out how much it would cost to charge these cars at home but get nonsense results. My electric cost is 23.838p  per kWh (rate applies 24 hours a day). Would anyone be kind enough to work out how much it would cost to charge both these cars from 0-100%. I can then compare that to the petrol cost of doing 200 miles and 30 miles in our current car.

                                  4) I believe that most people charge to 80% as the final 80-100% takes considerably longer. Is that correct? Does this mean that a car with a realistic range of say 200 miles will achieve 160 miles on an 80% charge, or isn’t it as simple as that?

                                  5) Do you have to have a Smart meter to have an EV charger installed?

                                  I’m sure that I’ll have more questions as I go on, so many thanks in anticipation. BMW dealer trying to sort out a long test drive for me in an iX1 20e M-Sport.

                                  • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Glos Guy.
                                  • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Glos Guy.
                                  #271408
                                  Markymate
                                  Participant

                                    @Glos Guy.  Here’s the new MY25 model Tucson which has now become available to order.  Now got the KIA duel 12.3″ dash.

                                    https://www.hyundai.com/uk/en/models/new-tucson.html

                                    https://dmassets.hyundai.com/is/content/hyundaiautoever/New+TUCSONpdf-1

                                    • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by Markymate.
                                    #271412
                                    Glos Guy
                                    Participant

                                      @Glos Guy. Here’s the new MY25 model Tucson which has now become available to order. Now got the KIA duel 12.3″ dash. https://www.hyundai.com/uk/en/models/new-tucson.html

                                      You’re an absolute star. Thank you so much.

                                      #271417
                                      MFillingham
                                      Participant

                                        I’ll put my 2p in:

                                         

                                        1. Depending upon state of charge, charger speed and how many others are charging (compared to capacity of the supply) you can do a splash and dash but I’d argue that stopping for 10 minutes would double the benefit without costing a stupid amount of time.  Mathematically if you’re charging at 100kWh for 10 minutes that’s a sixth, which would get you about 16-17 kWh.  If you’re getting an average of 3.5 miles per kWh then that’s about 55 miles.

                                        2. Charging to 100% to stand isn’t advised.  However, both the charger and car can be programmed to charge to 80 or 90% at which level you should be able to let it stand without risk of damage.  What power gets lost depends greatly upon what is running whilst the car isn’t in use.  Some cars can be set to wake up and heat the interior (for example) at a set time daily, that can dramatically reduce the charge level.

                                        3.  I’m not sure of the battery capacity in the BMWs but if I were to do a 20-80% charge overnight at your cost per kWh then it’ll be 46.2 kWh costing  a smidge over £11 per charge.  Estimating 4 miles per kWh that’s around 6p per mile.

                                        4. The 20-80 range is mostly for rapid charging as outside of that the battery software slows charging for protection.  That means you’re effectively using 60% of the battery so 120 of the 200 miles.  However, if your journey is from home, then you start at 100% and then boost up by the numbers discussed above.  So you’d still get 200 miles plus a little extra for your pee stop.

                                        5. You have to have a smart meter for an EV specific tariff, most of which charge you a little more through the day to save you extra overnight (5-7 hours).  The likes of the Octopus Go and variable tracker tariffs may allow a set rate for vehicle charging without needing a specific time but will still need a smart meter.  Not having a smart meter just means the cost per kWh is set either at a 24 hour rate or economy 7 if the meter is set that way.

                                        What you will get used to quickly is the convenience of plugging in when you get home on a charging night and ignoring the car until the morning when it’s fully charged or charged to the predefined level.

                                        On longer journeys, follow the motto ‘charge when you stop, don’t stop to charge’ and you should find things most enjoyable.  I find we stop at the same place for years, it’s usually about half an hour which in the Ioniq 5 with its 800v architecture means it’s nearly refilled when we get back to the car.

                                        I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                        I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                        Mark

                                        #271421
                                        kezo
                                        Participant

                                          1) Are very quick ‘splash and dash’ charges (as described above) viable? What sort of extra range can I expect to get in 10 minutes max? 2) If I charge a BEV (or a PHEV for that matter) to 100% on one day and then don’t use the car for say another 3 days (as occasionally happens) – or for a week or two if on holiday – when I go back to the car will it still be at 100%? I’ve never thought about this issue, but a review of the Mazda CX-60 suggested that the 100% dropped to as low as 80% after a few days if the car wasn’t used. Is that a thing, or a fault with the CX-60? 3) Whilst running costs aren’t terribly high on my list of priorities, I’d be interested to know how the costs would compare to our current petrol car. I’ve tried working out how much it would cost to charge these cars at home but get nonsense results. My electric cost is 23.838p  per kWh (rate applies 24 hours a day). Would anyone be kind enough to work out how much it would cost to charge both these cars from 0-100%. I can then compare that to the petrol cost of doing 200 miles and 30 miles in our current car. 4) I believe that most people charge to 80% as the final 80-100% takes considerably longer. Is that correct? Does this mean that a car with a realistic range of say 200 miles will achieve 160 miles on an 80% charge, or isn’t it as simple as that? 5) Do you have to have a Smart meter to have an EV charger installed?

                                          Firstly appolgies for not getting back to you this morning but, I did read it over a coffee before going out!

                                          1 – Theoretically we will base this on the BMW’s claimed range of 279 miles.

                                          The iX1 has a 64kWh battery and an average DC fast charging speed of 130kW. If hooked up to a 150kW charger it would take 29 minutes to add 80% charge or 223 miles. If you had a 10 min pee stop, it would add a third of the 223 miles, meaning you would add about 74 miles, in 10 minutes.

                                          Keep in mind charging times can vary based on factors such as the ambient temperature, temperature of the battery and current state of charge.

                                          2- A lithium battery shouldn’t theoretically loose charge, unless there is a drain on the system. That said, it is not optimal to leave 100% charge in a lithium battery, when the vehicle isn’t being used.

                                          3 – Cost to charge price per kWh of electricity multiplied percentage charge you are topping up the battery. 100% charge 0.23838p x 64.7 = £15.42 , 80% top up 0.23838p x 51.76 = £12.33

                                          (% charge required x 64.7 / 100 x by pench per kWh)

                                          4- You normally charge from approx 20 % to 80% and charge to 100% on longer journeys. I’m going to get slated here but, battery’s have a useable capacity and a gross capacity that acts as a buffer zone. Topping up the battery to 100% won’t be a problem. The big problem is the time taken to charge from 80 – 100% is considerably slower and your 10 minute pee stop will turn into a hour.

                                          5 – No but if you wan’t to take advantage of cheap electricity tariff, the answer is yes unfortunately!

                                          I will be back 🙂

                                           

                                          #271431
                                          72 dudes
                                          Participant

                                            Mark and Kezo have replied better than I could have done!

                                            My only additional point is that 200 miles from an iX1 would be an almost worst case scenario during winter month, so any additional miles you get in warmer weather can only improve on the calculations above.

                                            Also, and I know money is not a major factor in your decision, remember that Motability no longer supply a charging point FOC for PHEVs, just EVs.

                                            Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                            #271432
                                            MFillingham
                                            Participant

                                              @72_dudes is right about charging, although given the pain some have suffered, going privately with Zappi might prove a better outcome.  Might be worth checking with an electrician, can’t think off one off hand though😁 @kezo

                                              I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                              I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                              Mark

                                              #271437
                                              des
                                              Participant

                                                Handy that as I’m going for a spin to Dublin tomorrow to see some dead people lol. I will charge the car tonight and give you a full breakdown of the figures tomorrow. I don’t need to charge for this run but usually do as I can get a great free parking spot in central Dublin. That’s another wee perk of ev owning.

                                                Kezo is right about the public chargers from 80-100% not only do they go slow but you get a fine for staying over 80%. I need the 100% as I do a lot of miles on my trips. My last fine was 5 euro. I don’t know if they are all like that but ESB here are.

                                                I’ve just went through my charge history for last year with ESB which is really all I use here as they are/were the main supplier. These figures won’t give miles given but the numbers guys on here might be able to work it out based on my Konas battery.

                                                My driving style is always around 78-80 motorway A roads, 60-68 B roads, 34ish around city main roads. Heat usually 21 and music always on and basically 3 adults always. I usually get 270ish in the summer and 220ish winter. Either way I’m guaranteed 200miles. Incase it helps.

                                                42.4kwh  £24.44  time 58 min

                                                2.2.            £1.25.            12 min

                                                36.8.          £21.21.          1hr 2 min

                                                And in the good days 2 charges equaling 48kwh taking 4 hours and costing 0 lol ah I miss the free charging.

                                                My current tariff is an EV tariff and is 35p a kwh at day rate and 19p kwh night rate. Which if I’m right the Kona would cost £12 to get a full charge. My old 3008 done 90 miles for £20 at petrol prices over 3 years ago, I think it was around £1.05.

                                                • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by des.
                                                #271439
                                                kezo
                                                Participant

                                                  Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                  Ofgen is considering a two rate tariff (what a suprise not!). From my POV as an electrician its not good idea to have white goods running whils’t one is a sleep nd I’m sure as hell the fire brigade would agree with me! From my perspective I’m happy my smartmeter is about as dumb as me 🙂

                                                  Secondly the “smart” in charger will one day in the not so distant future, will along with the smart meter allow what we all know as V2G on a similar basis to the intelligent tariffs 24 hours a day.

                                                  Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                  I have retired 🤣

                                                  Something I was going to discuss with @Gloss-Guy as hehewill have to sit down and have the discussion where charging is concerned, if he becomes serious about the iX1. Its not a simple installation put it that way 🙂

                                                  #271451
                                                  MFillingham
                                                  Participant

                                                    Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                    Ofgen is considering a two rate tariff (what a suprise not!). From my POV as an electrician its not good idea to have white goods running whils’t one is a sleep nd I’m sure as hell the fire brigade would agree with me! From my perspective I’m happy my smartmeter is about as dumb as me 🙂 Secondly the “smart” in charger will one day in the not so distant future, will along with the smart meter allow what we all know as V2G on a similar basis to the intelligent tariffs 24 hours a day.

                                                    Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                    I have retired 🤣 Something I was going to discuss with @Gloss-Guy as hehewill have to sit down and have the discussion where charging is concerned, if he becomes serious about the iX1. Its not a simple installation put it that way 🙂

                                                     

                                                    What happened with those quotes?

                                                     

                                                    Yeah, complex installs are definitely something the Motability install handles either averagely or really, really badly, depending on who you get given.  Again, if I knew an electrician, retired or not, I’d be seriously considering paying him to do a decent job on a decent charger, especially if something like solar panels could possibly be in my future.

                                                    I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                                    I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                                    Mark

                                                    #271452
                                                    des
                                                    Participant

                                                      Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                      Ofgen is considering a two rate tariff (what a suprise not!). From my POV as an electrician its not good idea to have white goods running whils’t one is a sleep nd I’m sure as hell the fire brigade would agree with me! From my perspective I’m happy my smartmeter is about as dumb as me 🙂 Secondly the “smart” in charger will one day in the not so distant future, will along with the smart meter allow what we all know as V2G on a similar basis to the intelligent tariffs 24 hours a day.

                                                      Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                      I have retired 🤣 Something I was going to discuss with @Gloss-Guy as hehewill have to sit down and have the discussion where charging is concerned, if he becomes serious about the iX1. Its not a simple installation put it that way 🙂

                                                      There’s a strange one. I went out and checked the Mi/kWh history. The first one was the first time I ever done a reset and I always said how bad my range was as people on here were getting well over 300. So why the big chance?

                                                      28/03/2024  36251 miles and 1.9 Mi/kWh

                                                      02/04/2024  36333 miles and  4.9 Mi/kWh

                                                      #271453
                                                      des
                                                      Participant

                                                        Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                        Ofgen is considering a two rate tariff (what a suprise not!). From my POV as an electrician its not good idea to have white goods running whils’t one is a sleep nd I’m sure as hell the fire brigade would agree with me! From my perspective I’m happy my smartmeter is about as dumb as me 🙂 Secondly the “smart” in charger will one day in the not so distant future, will along with the smart meter allow what we all know as V2G on a similar basis to the intelligent tariffs 24 hours a day.

                                                        Is there any reason why you would not switch to an Intelligent EV tariff like Octopus Intelligent Go? At 7.14p per KWh, it really does make sense. Octopus are still offering me occasional 3 hours of free daytime electricity once or twice per week which is brilliant too.

                                                        I have retired 🤣 Something I was going to discuss with @Gloss-Guy as hehewill have to sit down and have the discussion where charging is concerned, if he becomes serious about the iX1. Its not a simple installation put it that way 🙂

                                                        There’s a strange one. I went out and checked the Mi/kWh history. The first one was the first time I ever done a reset and I always said how bad my range was as people on here were getting well over 300. So why the big chance? 28/03/2024 36251 miles and 1.9 Mi/kWh 02/04/2024 36333 miles and 4.9 Mi/kWh

                                                        Quoted instead of editing. I’m away to bed lol

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