Tesla to open Supercharger network to other EV brands

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  • #159244 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    I thought they were available just now, gotitjulie could you shed some light on this?

    Tesla’s CEO, Elon Musk, made the announcement on Twitter, with the grand opening scheduled for later this year

    The Tesla Supercharger network will be opened to other electric vehicle brands later this year as confirmed by Tesla CEO, Elon Musk.

    Musk made the announcement to his Twitter following, which means exact details on when Tesla will make its charging stations available to other manufacturers is yet to be confirmed. Tesla is also yet to announce which countries will benefit from the new arrangement.

    Until now, the Tesla Supercharger network has been reserved for Tesla cars only, with the company controlling access in its older vehicles by engineering its own charging connector.

    More recently, though, Tesla’s cars shifted to conventional CCS and CHAdeMO charging sockets, with the firm restricting access to its Superchargers through a software limitation.

    When connected to a Supercharger, the new Tesla Model S Plaid can take on 200 miles of range in just 15 minutes thanks to the unit’s 250kW DC charging output.

    Tesla’s UK and European Superchargers have also been CCS and CHAdeMO compatible since 2018, which means all that should be required is a quick software tweak to give everything from the Nissan Leaf to the Porsche Taycan access to the chargers.

    Currently, the Tesla Supercharger network comprises more than 25,000 stations worldwide, which would make EV driver’s lives a little easier when hunting for a charging socket.

    However, even if the Tesla Supercharger network is opened to British EV drivers, given the size of the Supercharger network here currently, it won’t be enough to satisfy demand once the sale of pure combustion vehicles is banned in 2030.

    The SMMT estimates that 700 charge points would need to be installed daily between now and the end of the decade to properly support the market. Currently, the installation rate stands at around 42 per day.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #159250 Reply
    Rhodgie

    They are only usable by Tesla cars at the moment, no one else.

    Tesla are changing to CCS not CHAdeMO as this seems to have lost the battle and will be getting phased out.

    He has mentioned this before, I think it has something to do with Norway (or Europe in general?) who are going to make it legal that all cars can access all chargers so no more closed private networks

    #159251 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Thanks for that clarification Rhodgie.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #159253 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Tesla Superchargers currently only allow Teslas to charge here in the UK (and elsewhere).

    Tesla DESTINATION chargers, the 7kW/11kW AC charge points come in two varieties, the RED ones which are Tesla ONLY, and the WHITE ones which anyone can plug into using their Type 2 cable. If there is only 1 charger at a Destination it will likely be RED, if more than one then you’ll likely find the WHITE ones too.

    Things get a little more complex when you think about plugging other manufacturers cars into Tesla Superchargers, the newer ones are CCS but the way they work is different to a normal CCS charger, it’s the way the electricity is charged for. With a Tesla you simply plug into the Supercharger and the car & Supercharger communicate & the charge starts if it’s a Tesla using the SUBSCRIPTION method that goes with the CAR, so Tesla bills the Tesla owner depending on their subscription type about 24p per kWh.

    If you plug a BMW i3 into a Tesla Supercharger you’ll probably get stuck as it locks the cable in but doesn’t charge or let go, good luck with that at the moment, however, as we saw with Gridserve, the i3 can potentially communicate with the Charger & bill the owner. This doesn’t work with the VW ID3 as it doesn’t have the necessary logic as VW have gone with their own proprietary system (think Ionity chargers). Stellantis group cars I don’t know, I’ll try to find out from Gridserve (Not Stellantis Group as they’re prone to Gallic Shrugs, meaning they never thought about it but maybe their engineers did).

    So, Tesla Superchargers have no foolproof method of paying for a non-Tesla car to charge & this will be the sticking point that Tesla will want to work out & we may find some cars can & some can’t use these chargers.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by gothitjulie.
    #159259 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Well that’s a bit of a nightmare, I have every faith in Elon sorting it.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #159267 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Elon made the offer years ago & the other manufacturers turned him down, they only have themselves to blame & it’s a bit rich the European manufacturers running to the EU to put in place dictates to resolve a situation that they themselves caused. Elon already equipped the european Tesla Superchargers with CCS, if VW group keep making proprietary systems & expecting everyone else to follow & pay for them then they should expect resistance.

    The situation in Norway is the one to watch, Norway stops selling fossils in 2025, 5 years before the UK and 10 years before the EU. Norway will make the decisions on chargers & we will follow.

    Companies such as Gridserve & Fastned who are using the latest ABB chargers will be able to use “Fastcharge” – https://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/10/20171018-abb.html (this is the system that we saw Toddington Harper use at Toddington northbound services when he plugged his BMW i3 in & the charger communucated with the car & the session started automatically without needing a debit/credit/RFID/App.

     

     

    #159270 Reply
    PillBoy
    Participant

    My local rugby stadium in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, that opened in November 2008 has had four Tesla chargers from opening.  It’d be brilliant if I could use them while watching a game.

    #159277 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    My local rugby stadium in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, that opened in November 2008 has had four Tesla chargers from opening. It’d be brilliant if I could use them while watching a game.

    That might not work as those chargers aren’t accessible on match days according to comments  on Zap-Map, but, at other times you can use the one with the Red sign with “Electric Vehicles” written on it, that’s the one that is open to non-tesla EVs.

    Look for it on Zap-Map at Parc-Y-Scarlets, read the comments & look at the photos people have taken, you’ll soon know which one it is.

     

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by gothitjulie.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by gothitjulie.
    #159287 Reply
    Michael

    Sorry, I forgot to say that I do have access during matches.

    #159291 Reply
    Ian

    Any extra capacity in public charging that works has got to be good news.

    #159297 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Any extra capacity in public charging that works has got to be good news.

    Agreed, there are lots of Tesla Chargers where I often stop to charge at Amesbury A303, the two old BP Pulse chargers are usually taken but maybe 10 empty Tesla stalls. Although the McDonalds has 4 new Instavolt chargers which I don’t know if they’re gone live yet. The more the better.

     

    #159309 Reply
    Ian

    Tesla chargers very rarely full, I think win/win for Tesla/Ev owners/environment.

    #160026 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Slow-charging EVs could be charged more when Tesla Supercharger network opens for all
    Non-Tesla EVs will soon be able to access the Supercharger network using the firm’s app, but slow-charging cars may need to pay a premium.

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk recently confirmed plans to open the Tesla Supercharger network of rapid electric car charging points up to vehicles from other manufacturers. Musk has now offered some clarity on how non-Tesla EV drivers will be able to access the network.

    During Tesla’s quarterly financial conference, he said that electric car drivers looking to use the Supercharger network will access the charging points via the firm’s smartphone companion app. They’ll sign up for a Tesla account and be charged for a charging session in a similar way as they would using any other third-party charging point.

    “We are thinking about a real simple thing where you just download the Tesla app, you go to the Supercharger, you just indicate which stall you are in, you plug in your car, even if it’s not a Tesla, and you just access the app to tell “turn on the stall that I’m in for how much electricity”, and this should work for almost any manufacturer’s electric car,” he suggested.

    However, Musk confirmed that drivers of cars with older and slower charging standards would be liable to pay more for electricity at a Supercharger point.

    “If the charge rate is super-slow then someone will be charged more,” he said. “We’ll also be smarter with how we charge for electricity at the Supercharger,” suggesting prices may vary according to demand or the time of day.

    Tesla is currently upgrading its Superchargers so they can supply 300kW of peak charging power.

    Musk also offered a few words on the motive behind opening Tesla’s Supercharger network to other electric vehicle brands, saying: “Our goal is to support the advent of sustainable energy. It’s not to create a walled garden and bludgeon our competitors.”

    Until now, the Tesla Supercharger network has been reserved for Tesla cars only, with the company controlling access in its older vehicles by engineering its own charging connector. More recently, though, Tesla’s cars shifted to conventional Type 2 and CCS charging sockets in Europe, with the firm restricting access to its Superchargers through a software limitation.

    Using the current-generation 250kW DC Supercharger network, the new Tesla Model S Plaid can take on 200 miles of range in just 15 minutes. Similar charging speeds should be also achievable by other vehicles, providing their electrical systems can accept the power.

    Currently, the Tesla Supercharger network comprises more than 25,000 stations worldwide, which would make EV driver’s lives a little easier when hunting for a charging socket.

    However, even if the Tesla Supercharger network is opened to British EV drivers, given the size of the Supercharger network here currently, it won’t be enough to satisfy demand once the sale of pure combustion vehicles is banned in 2030.

    The SMMT estimates that 700 charge points would need to be installed daily between now and the end of the decade to properly support the market. Currently, the installation rate stands at around 42 chargers per day.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

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