Peugeot e2008 GT – One month on

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  • #122359 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    1 month old & 1673 miles covered

    I’ve stopped working out the cost per mile all the time, it probably doesn’t matter as it’s not much

    0-30mph acceleration upsets boy racer wannabes, electric is a silent assassin

    Car sneaks up behind people in car parks who are casually walking along in the middle of the roadway without a care in the World, until I blip the horn. People have not associated the artificial sounds at low speeds with it being a car yet.

    Parking attendant comes up to note the Reg No: of that Peugeot 2008 that has rudely taken an EV space, parking attendant nearly wets himself as the e2008 silently glides away from the parking space, narrowly missing him

    100kW charge speed on an Ultra Rapid is awesome to watch, even if it doesn’t last

    I like this car & I’m not going back to ever having a fossil car again

    But, the best bit is being able to pre-cool the car in hot weather before going out to it…. bliss!

     

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 44 total)
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  • #122362 Reply
    Menorca Mike

    Sounds fab Julie could you please put a photo on

    #122363 Reply
    Ellie

    Considering the e2008 so very interested to hear how you are getting on with it. What was the lead time?

    Is this the one with the sunroof?

    #122366 Reply
    Carl

    Sounds fabulous.   What real world miles are you getting per charge please.

    I test drive the e208, I was very impressed with everything.

    #122373 Reply
    TheSUVGuy

    Big fan of Peugeot’s, having had a 3008 myself, the new 3008 recently leaked on twitter they’re making it look more like the 2008 which is great imo, happy you’re enjoying your car 🙂

    #122380 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Considering the e2008 so very interested to hear how you are getting on with it. What was the lead time? Is this the one with the sunroof?

    Ellie, this was already at the docks here in the UK when I ordered it in June, so it only took a few weeks.

    It does have the sunroof, yes, and the sunroof does open. I wanted the sunroof as the GT Line & GT have black roof linings & would look very gloomy inside without it. This was about having to go to GT to get the active cruise control as it’s either that or have a left foot accelerator fitted as I did in my last two cars. If I didn’t have the right leg/foot issue then I would have gone for the Allure.

    Current lead times are a bit patchy, the factory in Spain that makes the e2008 is open again. They do a batch of each colour as they go along so you’re looking at September/October/November currently depending on the colour.

    My car is in the optional extra blue colour, the blue and the red are stunning, the orange is nice enough too in the flesh, white also looks great.

    Worth remembering that it’s a very new model still, & there is one particular horror to be aware of, that of the “app” that goes with the car, it’s made for fossils with the EV an afterthought, so it records infinity mpg for the journey logs for example. The app is also a bit remiss when it communicates with the car & hitting the refresh a couple of times is necessary to bring up the correct charging status. State of charge (SOC) is available in % only in the app, or, when you plug in the charge cable & open the drivers door it’s available for a few seconds on the dash, which will drive you nuts if you like SOC in % like most other EV drivers.

    Why do you need the SOC in %? Well, the car displays the GOM (Guess-O-Meter) which gives an estimate of range based upon your last journeys, usually the very recent ones, which is fun when you last drove the car in Sport Mode & you blasted back home like a lunatic, but, now the next day, with a full charge you go on a seriously economical journey which leaves you with a GOM reading at your destination of more miles than you started with. I hope Peugeot will understand & eventually provide a screen update so we can see % SOC. % SOC allows you to guestimate your own range based upon how you intend to drive & the terrain that you’ll be driving across, which ties back into the A Better Route Planner app which calculates where you will need to stop to charge on long expeditions.

     

     

    #122382 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Sounds fabulous. What real world miles are you getting per charge please. I test drive the e208, I was very impressed with everything.

    Carl, we’ve had excellent weather for range recently (25C gives a longer range than 5C as the battery likes some warmth).

    Best figures I’ve seen over a longish journey are maybe 4.3 miles per kWh (I saw 4.7 but the trip meter goes nuts sometimes when you rapid charge & throws the figures off so be careful using trip meters on this car), that was cruising the motorway at 60mph, fast A roads, etc., over about 265 miles return journey.

    Worst figures I’ve had were similar speeds to above but a little cooler & driving through a monsoon, where I managed just 3.3 miles per kWh.

    So real ranges at sensible speeds in the summer are perhaps 150 to 200 miles before you MUST recharge, you’ll recharge at 120 to 170 miles of course as you don’t want to see the turtle pop up as you drive from a non working charger to a working one.

    Winter range we don’t know yet, expect 150 miles from a full charge but it could be worse.

    Not sure how you are with Bjorn Nylands charge characteristic terminology, but the e2008 doesn’t “rapidgate” like the LEAF so you can keep charging time after time in the same day without too much of a problem.

    Peugeot has a range calculator on their eBrochure, look at the figures carefully as they appear to be pretty accurate. It’ll show that at lower temperatures & higher speeds you can get the range down below 100 miles, but you’ll have to really try.

    From a few of us with these cars we are calculating that the AVAILABLE CAPACITY of the battery is about 45kWh, which leaves a small top & bottom buffer. The top buffer means you can’t completely charge the battery & wreck it, and the bottom buffer means that a display of zero miles range is what you can get down to before charging, but you’ll be in a panic, the turtle will be showing, the car will be turning things off & slowing down to save its resources & you’ll have no idea how far you’ll get before it dies in the middle of the road. I’m chicken, I’ve only driven down to a range of 12 miles & I was already headed for a rapid charger.

    #122384 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Mike, how about a pic of my Zap-Map charging sessions?

    Weymouth BP

     

     

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by gothitjulie.
    #122388 Reply
    Markw
    Participant

    Very helpful and informative post, even for a Derv luddite like me.

    Car looks very nice, particularly in that colour,

    Maybe in 4 years time I’ll be ready for an electric vehicle and hopefully the charging infrastructure in the far north of England will be in place.

    Currently driving Seat Ateca 2.0 FR Sport TDI 190 DSG 4drive

    #122389 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Very helpful and informative post, even for a Derv luddite like me. Car looks very nice, particularly in that colour, Maybe in 4 years time I’ll be ready for an electric vehicle and hopefully the charging infrastructure in the far north of England will be in place.

    As long as you can have a home charger then you’ll find that the infrastructure is already in place, but the current worry in the area is the single rapid charger at any one site, once the twin chargers start appearing you’ll worry less about turning up to a charger & finding it not working with no close alternative. Zap-Map can already alleviate such worries to some extent now.

    The as yet unmentioned problem though is the availability of EVs that can carry a wheelchair, they are just starting to appear on Motability but it’ll be another year at a guess before there’ll be anything with enough range.

     

     

    #122398 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Car looks very nice, particularly in that colour

    That colour, Vertigo Blue, is an optional extra, cost me £150, but I do love it.

    I’d also recommend looking at the red they do, it’s also an eyecatcher.

     

    #122410 Reply
    Ellie

    Thank you @gohitjulie for all the useful information. You can’t beat hearing about real world experience and practical tips.

     

    I must admit I’m seriously tempted, especially in the blue with the sunroof. We did look at a GT but the garage wouldn’t let us both go out for a test drive due to covid. The sunroof wasn’t open and it was pretty gloomy with the black interior.

     

    Sounds like the app has some serious limitations, hopefully it will be updated as time goes on.

    My husband was very sceptical when I mentioned that I’d like to go electric with our next car, but he’s converted now. I think the e2008 would suit nearly all of the time. We do need to see if my manual wheelchair will go in the boot.

    Thanks again for all the information 😎

    #122412 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Ellie

    I’m not sure a manual wheelchair will fit unless it has the quick release wheels & fold down back etc., I know that mine will only just take my Foldawheel PW1000-XL. If the e2008 won’t take your wheelchair then there’s the MG ZS EV that has a larger boot & is an SUV type, and the Hyundai Ioniq Electric which has a larger shallower boot.

     

    #122414 Reply
    Carl

    Great updates Julie and I must say that electric blue u have is a fabulous colour.

    Another question, when u used the rapid chargers as per your pic, how long does it take to get a decent charge? And how much does that charge cost??

    #122415 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Hi Carl, using the Polar Plus card (free 3 month intro, & then reg another card using the 6 month Peugeot intro code), the cost on those 150kW chargers is a flat 20.4 pence per kWh, 50kW Polar rapids are 15 pence and the 7kW posts are either 12 pence or free.

    If you arrive at the charger with a very low state of charge (SOC), perhaps 10% area, you can get 100kW up to about 25% SOC, then it throttles to 75kW up to 50% SOC, then throttles to just over 50kW up to 72%. Then you need to make a decision on whether you leave for the next charger 100 miles away, or you stay & it throttles down to 25kW, and then gets even slower the nearer you approach 100% SOC. Of course, you charge to 80% then leave, having charged 10 to 80% in 1/2 hour. You’ve enjoyed the sandwich & coffee & taken care of the bladder.

    On a normal 50kW rapid you’re looking at around 40 minutes to get to that 80%.

    Use Zap Map to see what chargers are near you & what they charge. Zap Map can be set up to filter chargers by speeds, connector types (Tesla Superchargers aren’t much use to someone driving an e2008), companies, etc.

     

    #122431 Reply
    Peter

    Great posts, @gothitjulie.

    Echo your comments re the app.

    I’ve just come back from a few days in Scotland.  900 miles of free charging!  Easy…anything but.  Lots of problems with the CYC app not working.  Lots of chargers not working.  They all have lcd screens but it seems beyond them to have an out of order message.  Getting soaked when it pelts down trying to get the charger to work while trying to get through to Chargeplace Scotland isn’t exactly a stress buster!!

    Ullapool to Callander – the first two chargers tried not working.

    Callander to Eyemouth – app shows the perfect charging point at the harbour car park in Eyemouth.  Brilliant! I decided to check on ZapMap and there’s a user uploaded pic showing that the car park is closed!  Decided to stop elsewhere to charge before arrival.  Sure enough, when I got to Eyemouth the car park was completely fenced off.  I could see the EV charging point but no way to access it!

    To summarise, whilst rapid charging is free in Scotland, the infrastructure is poor and none working charging stations are commonplace.  Don’t rely on the app, get the Rfid card.  Expect to have a plan B and C ready.

    Motorway running – my DS3 Crossback E-Tense would have managed approx 150 at best on the worst day, doing around 60mph.  This was quite cold, belting down, with heating, demisters and headlights on.  Obviously, on the motorway, there’s really no regenerative braking putting charge back into the battery.

    At home, around the doors, I can manage the equivalent of 210 to 220 so a big difference.  Really cold winter weather will reduce these figures but I’m unlikely to do many motorway miles then too.

    #122437 Reply
    ChrisK
    Participant

    Very helpful and informative post, even for a Derv luddite like me. Car looks very nice, particularly in that colour, Maybe in 4 years time I’ll be ready for an electric vehicle and hopefully the charging infrastructure in the far north of England will be in place.

    As long as you can have a home charger then you’ll find that the infrastructure is already in place, but the current worry in the area is the single rapid charger at any one site, once the twin chargers start appearing you’ll worry less about turning up to a charger & finding it not working with no close alternative. Zap-Map can already alleviate such worries to some extent now. The as yet unmentioned problem though is the availability of EVs that can carry a wheelchair, they are just starting to appear on Motability but it’ll be another year at a guess before there’ll be anything with enough range.

    Sorry I’ve had to rewrite this post as my other one I just noticed had copyright pictures in so must of went into the spam folder.😊

     

    Anyway I agree with you about the lack of EV’s that can carry a wheelchair or assembled scooter (my main concern along with AP cost for large EV’s) but the point about the out of order chargers is something I’ve never thought about but queues at chargers are.

     

    To avoid the spam filter I have to say to do a Google for “Black Friday Tesla fail” and read about how folk spent hours in a queue for a quick charger. Something that is easily fixed by more charger but let’s face it, if the all wonderful super rich and environmentally friendly Californians can’t get it right what chance have we.

     

     

     

    #122439 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Peter, you seem to have enjoyed the cooler northern climes of Scotland, yes, the ChargePlace Scotland RFID card is necessary as you can’t get a good signal for the app at many of the remote locations, and yes, Scotland thinks it’s a good idea to shelter from COVID rather than repair chargers in remote places away from any COVID source.

    We had the opposite in weather terms, a real test where the aircon worked hard to keep the temperature down from 35C in the shade, it also burned through the battery like crazy leaving the range below 150 miles. In the current weather it’s far better.

    I think if you want to go over 60mph efficiently you need the Hyundai Ioniq Electric which is far more aerodynamic, but the balance is in the  faster charging rates on our cars.

     

    #122443 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Sorry I’ve had to rewrite this post as my other one I just noticed had copyright pictures in so must of went into the spam folder.😊 Anyway I agree with you about the lack of EV’s that can carry a wheelchair or assembled scooter (my main concern along with AP cost for large EV’s) but the point about the out of order chargers is something I’ve never thought about but queues at chargers are. To avoid the spam filter I have to say to do a Google for “Black Friday Tesla fail” and read about how folk spent hours in a queue for a quick charger. Something that is easily fixed by more charger but let’s face it, if the all wonderful super rich and environmentally friendly Californians can’t get it right what chance have we.

     

    Twice I’ve experiences a queue, once when I turned up at a single charger & someone was charging their Leaf, I arrived & they were at 98% and asleep in the car, so I awaited the 100% mark & knocked on his window, he was happy I’d saved him the overstay charge & immediately disconnected. Time wasted, about 5 minutes, so no problem. The second time it was me causing the queue at a 150kW charger, I pulled in to the second charger as another Leaf was in the first one, plugged in & started charging, soon to find that taxi drivers thought that they owned the chargers (they were Polar chargers & I’m a member). I told them to get lost & charged rapidly to about 70% in 15 minutes before leaving them to it.

    I think that there are going to be times when the queues appear (Friday early evening, Sunday early evening) and places that queues appear (A30 to Cornwall in summer). Watching some of Bjorn Nyland’s videos when he’s testing a car coinciding with a bank holiday you can see him encountering charger queues.

    It’s going to be years before we have enough chargers in enough places to completely avoid queues as the numbers of EVs rapidly increases. The trick will be knowing when they are going to be busy & avoiding those times, like we have for driving down to Cornwall around August Bank Holidays for decades.

    As for simply putting in more chargers quickly, that’s not so easy, those chargers will need an electricity supply & that can take years to arrange for a site, that’s why there are still some motorway service stations that don’t have EH chargers.

    #122435 Reply
    ChrisK
    Participant

    Very helpful and informative post, even for a Derv luddite like me. Car looks very nice, particularly in that colour, Maybe in 4 years time I’ll be ready for an electric vehicle and hopefully the charging infrastructure in the far north of England will be in place.

    As long as you can have a home charger then you’ll find that the infrastructure is already in place, but the current worry in the area is the single rapid charger at any one site, once the twin chargers start appearing you’ll worry less about turning up to a charger & finding it not working with no close alternative. Zap-Map can already alleviate such worries to some extent now. The as yet unmentioned problem though is the availability of EVs that can carry a wheelchair, they are just starting to appear on Motability but it’ll be another year at a guess before there’ll be anything with enough range.

    Yep the wheelchair/scooter capacity is one big downer but the problem of a charging stations being out of order would be less of a worry than this…

    Long queues at Tesla Supercharger station raises questions about the readiness of the EV market

    #122480 Reply
    Ellie

    Thanks @gohitjulie

    My wheelchair does fold down, but will need to try it when we test drive again. We currently have a diesel Touran with a hoist for my powerchair. I don’t really use it enough though to make it a must have for our next car. An EV’s aren’t there yet anyway.

    It is likely we will go for a e2008 now and then maybe a bigger EV when there are more on the scheme in 3 years or so.

    Such a useful thread. We are in a rural area so not a lot in the way of charging, but we would be charging at home nearly all of the time.

    It will be the occasional longer trips that we need to take into account.

    It is a lot easier to make an informed choice about a car now, with the information online and YouTube videos. Would like a printed brochure to browse and compare though but they don’t seem to do them anymore.

    #122484 Reply
    Carl

    Julie thanks for the info on the charging prices, very helpful indeed.   One last question, why cant you use the telsa rapid charges? Are the cables and pins different??  If they are can you get adaptors to make the e2008 fit them??

    #122490 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Julie thanks for the info on the charging prices, very helpful indeed. One last question, why cant you use the telsa rapid charges? Are the cables and pins different?? If they are can you get adaptors to make the e2008 fit them??

    Although the Tesla CCS would technically fit the e2008’s CCS socket, there would be no way to start a charge as a Tesla talks to the Tesla supercharger in a slightly different way, there is no screen or RFID reader, it’s all done by the onboard computer. The Tesla superchargers in europe have a CCS plug so that Model 3s can charge as they have CCS in europe (includes UK of course), however, a Model 3 can charge from another providers CCS charger.

    It is possible to use some of the Tesla Destination chargers, usually the white ones, for a 7kW type 2 charge.

    At some stage when battery prices are far lower, and Tesla have managed to saturate its market with cras, they may start reducing the prices & even offer discounts, then perhaps Motability will be interested in them. That’s many years away though.

    You can have a Tesla is you want to, look at the lease prices, they’re pricey.

     

    #122506 Reply
    Rhodgie

    gothitjulie… those are good, well informed, balanced posts, so good to read instead of the usual nonsense that is normally posted on here, and on social media in general, by people who are not only ignorant of the facts but are unwilling to learn although not shy of spouting their own views on what’s wrong with EVs… no doubt relations of those who said the same about the original motor vehicles taking over from horses 🤷‍♂️

    Gothitjulie I do like the Peugeot but like all cars from the PSA group I find the charge port location too awkward to access from a wheelchair and at certain chargers, I find having them in the front much easier.

    I do use zapmap but prefer PlugShare as it gets updated more often, still not 100% perfect but getting there 🤞

    #122516 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    motor vehicles taking over from horses

    It’ll never happen, us women love the horses.

     Gothitjulie I do like the Peugeot but like all cars from the PSA group I find the charge port location too awkward to access from a wheelchair and at certain chargers, I find having them in the front much easier.

    Absolutely agree on the charge port location, the new BP Polar 150kW chargers have an annoyingly short cable & it requires parking offset in the bay to have any chance of reaching, but Polar will learn to use longer cables as we’re already complaining about this shortcoming to them. You’re right about the front being the right place in the current chargers setups, but if the chargers were layed out at the sides of longer bays like you see them on Bjorn Nyland’s videos then things would be a lot easier. I think it’s just the charger providers here in the UK hate disabled people & put steps & chargers in the wrong places merely to discriminate (of course if they read this they’ll realise they haven’t thought things through & need to do things differently, & they’re not trying to discriminate at all, they’re merely not too bright.. that’s their disability).

    #122580 Reply
    Ellie

    @gothitjulie did you have a home charger fitted, and if so how smooth was the process? Thanks.

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