Peugeot 3008 Hybrid review

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  • #141232 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    The Peugeot 3008 Hybrid is both fast and cheap to run, but it’s expensive to buy, feels heavy, and loses some of the non-hybrid versions’ practicality

    The Peugeot 3008 Hybrid is one of a raft of medium-sized plug-in hybrid family SUVs that arrived in 2020, alongside its sister models the Vauxhall Grandland X Hybrid, Citroen C5 Aircross Hybrid and DS 7 Crossback E-TENSE. There’s also the Ford Kuga Plug-In Hybrid, plus BMW’s X1 and X2 hybrids to contend with in what has quickly become a very crowded field.

    On paper, the Peugeot 3008 Hybrid’s numbers are impressive, as we’ve come to expect from plug-in models. CO2 emissions as low as 29g/km allied to a pure-electric range of up to 40 miles mean a Benefit-in-Kind company-car tax rate of just 10% during the 2020/21 financial year, rising only to 11% and then 12% in the two following years. And potential fuel economy – if you regularly plug it in – is as high as 235mpg.

    The range-topping 3008 Hybrid4 is driven by the same 296bhp petrol-electric drivetrain used by the Vauxhall and DS models mentioned above. It consists of two electric motors paired with a 197bhp, 1.6-litre turbocharged engine to deliver that hefty maximum output, and means the 3008 Hybrid4 is fast as well as potentially very frugal. There’s also a less expensive 222bhp version, called simply the Hybrid, with a single electric motor (and therefore no four-wheel drive).

    There are a number of driving modes to select, and in ‘Sport’ the full power of the car is unleashed, allowing for a 5.9-second 0-62mph time in the Hybrid4. The eight-speed automatic gearbox isn’t the smoothest-shifting transmission we’ve encountered, but this 3008 can still take off like a hot hatchback when you put your foot down. There’s a good deal of vibration and noise when you do so, but fortunately the engine is much quieter when driven more sedately.

    You’re likely to spend much more of your time in ‘Electric’ or ‘Hybrid’ mode. In the former, Peugeot says you should be able to keep going for up to 40 miles on power from the car’s 13.2kWh battery alone without waking the engine. Doing this, the 3008 is extremely smooth, quiet and relaxing to drive – a sensation enhanced by good ride quality, even on large 19-inch alloy wheels.

    In ‘Hybrid’ mode, the 3008 behaves more like a Toyota or Honda ‘full hybrid’, deciding itself whether to use electric or petrol power, or mix the two, in order to make progress as efficiently as possible. You can also hold on to battery charge until you want or need to use it – when you enter an urban area, for example. And the fact that there are two electric motors means you get proper four-wheel drive, too – although it doesn’t quite turn the clearly road-biased 3008 into a Land Rover Defender rival.

    In order to even get close to that headline fuel-economy figure, you need to charge up the 3008 regularly – most likely from a home wallbox that can be installed when you buy the car. Doing so takes less than two hours, which makes it easy to fit in and around a busy lifestyle. A smartphone app allows you to set charging times to take advantage of cheaper overnight electricity, while the heating or air-conditioning can be pre-set to have the car at a certain temperature for you when you leave.

    Peugeot has made some compromises made in order to carry the battery: the fuel tank is 10 litres smaller than a regular 3008’s, and boot space comes down from 520 to 395 litres. You do at least get a dedicated 25-litre area for storing the cables while on the move. And while the battery takes away space, it adds weight: 340kg, to be exact, making the hybrid 3008 feel a lot less agile through corners than its purely petrol or diesel-engined counterparts.

    In practice, that means there’s little inclination to use the prodigious performance we mentioned earlier, and therefore seemingly little reason to shell out the at least £43,500 demanded for the two-motor ‘Hybrid4’ version. In reality, it’s only really going to make sense for company-car drivers.

    For private buyers, the standard Hybrid is priced around £5,000 less than a Hybrid4 in the same trim level, but it’s also available in a cheaper ‘Allure’ specification, so you can actually get behind the wheel of one for a little over £36,500, escaping the higher annual rate of VED (road tax) for £40,000+ cars in the process.

    Whichever of the two you choose, you’ll get the generous standard equipment, head-turning exterior styling, high-tech dashboard and comfortable interior the 3008 has become known for since its launch. You just have to be sure you can live with the practicality sacrifices, and remember that those scintillating on-paper performance figures don’t necessarily translate to a thrilling driving experience.

     

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

Viewing 24 replies - 1 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #141237 Reply
    PraxxtorCruel
    Participant

    So what real world electric only figure would one get living in a city? I dont get the whole hybrid thing. When its using petrol and electric at the same time is the mpg really in the hundreds range? How far would the two working in tandem go for before the electric motors run out and then you’re solely relying on petrol considering electric only states up to 40miles.</p>

    #141266 Reply
    Speedy James

    A lot of car for the AP and I expect the Vauxhall Grandland will follow soon with a lower AP for essentially the same vehicle.

    #141269 Reply
    sif

    The big advantage is the 4×4. Otherwise the straight line power isn’t going to change the handling around bends. It comes with all season tyres at least and gets over range anxiety. 4o miles range all electric is pretty good and for a lot of people will mean no petrol used at all month after month. The boot isn’t huge but if you are a fan of the 3008 then its a welcome addition. It will be the best car on the scheme for some. If you add pano roof, elec seats and elect tailgate, special paint and wireless charging, visio, it adds 2.7 to the cost of the dep. But then you get something that will be very well specced. I spoke to the dealer this morning and he reckons delivery end of July. My wife has a diesel hybrid 4×4 3008, its been faultless for the last 5 yrs.

    #141272 Reply
    sif

    Forgot to add the faster, optional charger, rounds it up to around 3k of extras.

    #141281 Reply
    brydo

    Its a lovely looking car, one that’s in my top five, but as you can see from the photo of the inside it’s a wee bit clostriphobic IMO.

    #141290 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    300hp in a Peugeot chassis?  I’d rather not think of the potential to end up in a hedge…

    #141291 Reply
    Speedy James

    On the top of the range model is panoramic roof and electric seats standard? Pretty sure there are on the Vauxhall when it eventually arrives. 3008 looks fantastic though.

    #141296 Reply
    JohntheLeg
    Participant

    @Speedy James. Top of the range GT Premium gets the electric seats pack but the  panoramic roof is a £900.00 optional extra.

     

    #141305 Reply
    Speedy James

    Thanks John. Do you know if the seats have memory function please? And I have lost track of APs but I  think I would be considering either/ or the less powerful 2wd or 4wd.

    #141306 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    300hp in a Peugeot chassis? I’d rather not think of the potential to end up in a hedge…

    They manage to run a WRC team so i’m sure they can get an SUV around a corner.

    #141309 Reply
    JohntheLeg
    Participant

    Any time. @Speedy James. Driver & Passenger Seat Pack – includes heated front seats and manual longitudinal adjustment to cushion nose. Driver seat only:- 8-way electric adjustment, 2 position memory function, multi-point massage function, electric lumbar adjustment.  Passenger seat only:- electric seat angle adjustment

    4 Plugin Hybrid 225hp added front wheel drive automatic £2899 Allure – £3799 GT Premium

    +2 Plugin Hybrid 300hp four wheel drive automatic £3349 Allure, £3599 GT trim.

    #141314 Reply
    pendelton

    When you forget to add the charger, it comes with around 3,000 extras.

    #141326 Reply
    Menorca Mike
    Participant

    Any time. @Speedy James. Driver & Passenger Seat Pack – includes heated front seats and manual longitudinal adjustment to cushion nose. Driver seat only:- 8-way electric adjustment, 2 position memory function, multi-point massage function, electric lumbar adjustment. Passenger seat only:- electric seat angle adjustment 4 Plugin Hybrid 225hp added front wheel drive automatic £2899 Allure – £3799 GT Premium +2 Plugin Hybrid 300hp four wheel drive automatic £3349 Allure, £3599 GT trim.

    300hp in a Peugeot chassis? I’d rather not think of the potential to end up in a hedge…

    They manage to run a WRC team so i’m sure they can get an SUV around a corner.

    . I agree

    BBC Breakfast expert, VW Golf driver.

    #141330 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    I wasn’t going to respond but now Menorca Mike has waded in, I will.

    My comment was intended to be light-hearted wmc, which you seem to have missed in making your spurious response.  Do I need to point out that WRC teams employ skilled rally drivers to drive their cars which themseves bear little relation to the cars the respective manufacturers sell?

     

    #141333 Reply
    Speedy James

    Thanks for you help about electric seats etc. Strange perhaps that in top spec the more powerful 4×4 version is cheaper than the less powerful 2wd version in terms of AP.

    #141337 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    WW – Your comment was ‘in a lighthearted’ way intended to belittle Peugeot, the manufacturer, and the quality of their product. Dress it up as you wish.

    #141338 Reply
    Wigwam

    Funnily enough, it wasn’t, but there you go.

    #141339 Reply
    psuader

    WW’s comment came across as lighthearted to an objective reader like me. Remember, if you are old enough, their hot hatches were known for ending up in hedges due to inexperienced drivers unable to handle such feisty machines. Just my tu’ppeneth….

    #141340 Reply
    RICHARD WAITES

    I think the only mistake would be to think that Peugeot is in some way branding this as a hot hatch, which it isn’t. Give lots of people 300 bhp in any car and they will find their way into a hedge bottom. As a safe, practical family car I think it ticks a lot of boxes.

    #141341 Reply
    file28
    Participant

    The 300bhp would be helpful when overtaking to enable a much safer pass, our Ateca has 190 and makes passing quicker and safer

    By the way I used to enjoy our old 205gti, much fun in the hills around North Wales

    "the world is full of kings and queens who blind your eyes and steal your dreams-its heaven and hell "(RJD)
    Seat Ateca FR Black Edition 2.0tsi 190 dsg 4drive Nevada White

    #141350 Reply
    solent60
    Participant

    The 300bhp would be helpful when overtaking to enable a much safer pass, our Ateca has 190 and makes passing quicker and safer By the way I used to enjoy our old 205gti, much fun in the hills around North Wales

    “Life for the Peugeot 205 began in 1983, when it was launched as the successor to the 104 supermini. Created to fill the gap between the 104 and the larger 305, the 205 was penned in-house by Gerard Welter with interior touches done by Paul Bracq. In its debut year, the Peugeot 205 finished runner-up in the European Car of the Year but was rightfully awarded the 1983 Car of the Year by What Car?.

    The French manufacturer quickly realised the model’s sporting potential and a year later, in April 1984, released the Peugeot 205 GTi. Powered by a 105bhp 1.6-litre engine and tipping the scales at less than 900kg, it could shoot from 0-62mph in 8.7sec and had a top speed of 116mph.

    The faster GTi 1.9 was launched at the end of 1986, boasting 130bhp. It was capable of completing the 0-62mph sprint in 7.8sec and boasted a top speed of 127mph. During 1986 the 1.6-litre version was also upgraded, with peak power now quoted at 115bhp”.

    I have a new 208 GT on order with 130bhp – the same as the 205 GTi 1.9 was back in 1986 at launch. I ordered it (after a test drive) mainly because I wanted to put a smile back on my face like the 205 did back in the mid-late 1980’s. Of course I’m a (lot!) older now – but for me personally – I’d like to think that it isn’t quite time for me to buy a woolly cardigan with leather patches on the elbows, join the local lawn bowls club, and buy mini electric clippers to trim my ear hairs… just yet!

    #141354 Reply
    Ian Price

    It would seem to me that there is no longer a cap for BHP or the on the road price. unless I have misread this, the 3008 Hybrid GT premium 300BHP on the road price is £47,210.

    This cant be right.

    #141370 Reply
    HammerHead
    Participant

    Firstly, I think it is soo refreshing having the choice of anything with this power output.

    Secondly, the 300 BHP is NOT available on the scheme in GT Premium trim (which is why its cheaper).

    Finally, why oh why is there no heated steering wheel???

    #141421 Reply
    Speedy James

    Thanks HH not appreciated the spec difference of the high output model.

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