Ownership of a Battery Electric Vehicle

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #222902
    MFillingham
    Participant

      It was suggested that I started a guide from those of us who own one of the many Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) on the scheme for those who were either considering for their next car or were looking into the future feeling the inevitability of the switch looming in the distance.

       

      For those who own a BEV, please feel free to add your experience but bear in mind this is intended to help, not preach.

      I fear this might be a long post, so I’ll probably break it down into several posts just to ease the reading.

      Ownership can be broken into 4 areas (which might expand over time) Terminology, Driving, Charging at home and Charging away from home.  I am not in a position to go into depth about the environmental impact of any vehicle, let alone the new technology, so I’m going to gracefully bow out of that area.

      Terminology.  There’s a lot of changes to keep in mind.  Starting with the various types of Electric Vehicles.

      There’s the Mild Hybrid and Full Hybrid – both running on petrol/diesel most of the time and adding power from a small battery through a motor either to add power or to provide a short range of running without burning fuel.

      Plug in Hybrid (PHEV) this is a half way solution between ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) and full BEV.  The battery is big enough to typically give between 15 and 50 miles of pure electric driving.  Then, should that run out, there’s a ICE ready to take over and keep driving.  This means that long trips don’t come with the thoughts about charging and taking breaks but local trips have all the benefits to the local air quality of electric driving.

      Regenerative Braking, Regen. When an ICE vehicle slows down, there’s physical resistance put through the braking system which slows the car.  This generates a certain amount of heat as wasted energy, it also requires a number of materials that will need replacing over time.  Whilst an EV will still have these,  there is a system in place that can slow a car using the same motor that drives it forward.  It uses that motor to run in reverse – using physical motion to create electrical energy.  This puts a little back into the battery and reduces the speed of the car without physical braking.  Some cars have one level and it’s either on or off, others have several different levels between a slight slowing over time to a rather aggressive and dramatic stop.

      One Pedal Driving – a continuation of Regenerative Braking is the ability to use only the accelerator.  Much like a go cart you press the pedal to go forward and release it to slow down.  This can be at a rate where the car will come to a complete stop in a reasonable distance or can reduce to a near stop in a controlled but still useful manner.  When driving around town this becomes a very useful manner of driving, especially for those of us with lower limb struggles who may find twisting the foot between the accelerator and brake to be a struggle at times.  Easing this movement down to either a point where you need to come to a complete stop or even just to hold the car once stopped is much better for the driver that the constant stop/go of heavy traffic.

      Measurements of power – the Kilowatt Hour (kWh) is the measure of storage, it’s how much the battery holds and is the release of 1 kilowatt over for an hour.  The Kilowatt, is a measure of power and is usually the power provided by the motor.  Even dealers get these mixed up, so don’t feel bad if you don’t get it.  Storage is simple, the more you have the further you can go (bearing in mind that more batteries equals more weight).

      If anyone has more they’d like to add, please feel free.

      My next post will be driving.

      I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
      I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

      Mark

    Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 104 total)
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      Replies
    • #222956
      simon obrien

        Could anyone with experience of EV’s please comment on the effectiveness of heating/air conditioning. My wife’s health conditions make her very sensitive to hot/ cold and the conventional heater is simple to adjust. I am aware that some TVs rely on heated seats/steering wheel, but what about ambient heating and the ability to blow hot or cold air for short durations?

        #222953
        Harry CARSON

          MFillingham Sir.

          May I thank and congratulate you on the comprehensive, clear and concise guide to living with a BEV.

          My earlier comment had an error at the very start.

          I used ‘had’ instead of ‘have’. The replacement vehicle is not yet built. Thank you also for reaffirming the infrastructure deficit in rural areas especially Cornwall and for pointing out the worsening situation with the influx os summer visitors.

          I will, hopefully, return to an electric vehicle. The technical development will see smaller more powerful batteries….. whether lithium ( Cornish or otherwise) or hydrogen cells. We only have to see the development of mobile phones and desktop/laptop to appreciate the speed of change.

          Kindest regards. At last I am warm!

          Harry

          #222961
          Marc
          Participant

            Interesting read here. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/rowan-atkinson-duped-electric-vehicles-b2351023.html

            Oh dear, here we go. The news article was based on the finding of a report that looked at the build of the Polestar 2, a car that, if it was as bad as the report claimed, wouldn’t have been built with that ‘catastrophic’ environmental impact. The original report concluded that the manufacturing process was significantly worse than ICE, which isn’t unknown and then overstated the miles required for the balance to be made. The report was released through a PR company whose director was a former nurse and the wife of the political relations team at Aston Martin. With a proven bias and released through a media well known for an anti-EV standpoint, this report was analysed and debunked years ago. https://insideevs.com/news/458458/legacy-automakers-backed-study-against-evs-debunked/amp/ The analysis shows that by the time the Volvo XC40 hit 140,000km (87k miles) it produced a total of 60 tonnes of CO2 it also concludes that, if driven here in the UK, the car would total half that, at 30 tonnes, by 200,000km (120k miles). By my calculations that’s an additional 20t of CO2 in 120,000 miles of UK driving which is 29,000 miles worth of XC40 driving.

            Can I just clarify I’m not against BEV’s I just thought it was an interesting read and had no idea it had been debunked as false. Interesting to read from your link that the anti BEV’s don’t include the carbon foot print from drilling for, refining and transporting fuel for ICE cars.

            Daughters motability car Vauxhall Grandland 1.5 diesel automatic Ultimate.
            My car SEAT Ibiza SE Tec 1.2 petrol TSI 2017.

            #222972
            MFillingham
            Participant

              Could anyone with experience of EV’s please comment on the effectiveness of heating/air conditioning. My wife’s health conditions make her very sensitive to hot/ cold and the conventional heater is simple to adjust. I am aware that some TVs rely on heated seats/steering wheel, but what about ambient heating and the ability to blow hot or cold air for short durations?

               

              Heating is at least as good as ICE.  Heat initially is created  while the battery cooling system generates the heat but there’s a downside – whereas the heating also draws some power from an ICE pushing the mpg down, in a BEV it hits the range, which isn’t huge in the first place.  That’s why in an EV heated seats are more important, they don’t draw power from the high voltage battery but the 12 volt one.  If the in car environment needs warming, be aware that you’ll lose some range (depending upon car, potentially 25%) but planning accordingly can mean that you can cope easily enough.

               

              MFillingham Sir. May I thank and congratulate you on the comprehensive, clear and concise guide to living with a BEV. My earlier comment had an error at the very start. I used ‘had’ instead of ‘have’. The replacement vehicle is not yet built. Thank you also for reaffirming the infrastructure deficit in rural areas especially Cornwall and for pointing out the worsening situation with the influx os summer visitors. I will, hopefully, return to an electric vehicle. The technical development will see smaller more powerful batteries….. whether lithium ( Cornish or otherwise) or hydrogen cells. We only have to see the development of mobile phones and desktop/laptop to appreciate the speed of change. Kindest regards. At last I am warm! Harry

               

              Harry, thank you.  There are new batteries in development just about everywhere, BYD have a new solid state that is used in their own cars and some Teslas.  There are new materials, including silicon to increase either the capacity or charging speed.  The hope is still to get a huge range rechargeable in a very short time.

               

              Can I just clarify I’m not against BEV’s I just thought it was an interesting read and had no idea it had been debunked as false. Interesting to read from your link that the anti BEV’s don’t include the carbon foot print from drilling for, refining and transporting fuel for ICE cars.

               

              Ok, I apologise, it’s easy to be a little touchy given how many are keen to jump in and spread misinformation deliberately.

              It’s amazing how people used statistics to prove their point whilst abusing the whole statistical integrity behind their point.  The most common, as you’ve pointed out is they use the most inefficient, poluting generation of electricity and attribute that to any EV and then look solely at the chemicals produced from the tail end of their ICE car and ignore the fact it was dragged up from below the Earth’s surface, transported to a plant, transformed into something suitable for purpose, then transported to a holding place, transported again to a retail hub and on again to the petrol station from which it was bought.  The gallons of diesel in transport (and the creation of that fuel), the megawatts of electricity used in refining (although the refining process creates multiple products simultaneously) all forgotten.

               

              The reality of the findings are that it does have a bigger environmental impact to build a BEV.  However, from that point onwards the CO2 impacts is lots against practically none.  People forget things like the efficiency of the motor, the lack of energies created in the combustion process that don’t go into forward motion (heat, noise) as opposed to the minimal losses between battery and wheels. Even forgetting all the surplus energies used getting the fuel to the car, there’s huge losses transforming petrol or diesel into mechanical energy. From generation to transformers to chargers to battery to motor to wheels the losses are less than 25%, that’s significantly less loss in the whole supply chain for each kW provided to the wheels.

              There are a lot of BEV drivers here, in the process of writing all of this, I’ve realised that it’s been so long I now see driving as driving I’ve forgotten the reality of driving an ICE automatic or otherwise.  The noise, the pulling away slowly, the smells, the whole experience has gone, it’s been 3 years in this car, 3.5 years before that in a Range Extended BEV (a petrol generator that kicks in when there’s insufficient battery power OR a switch has dictated petrol power still running a motor to drive the wheels) so it’s been nearly 7 years now since I owned a car driven solely by an ICE.   To be honest, I know there are compromises and the infrastructure needs to improve, the understanding and attitudes to driving an electric vehicle could be better but, personally, I’ve found my future in personal mobility and it’s a glorified, over-priced, over-engineered milk float.

              I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
              I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

              Mark

              #222967
              Jim

                The heater in an BEV works quicker than the heater in an ICE but some people prefer to maximise their range by just relying on heated seats/steering wheel.

                #222998
                Sue
                Participant

                  A very interesting and informative read, especially around the charging capacities and types, I must admit I had been completely confused by them too.

                  However, it has made it clear to me and confirmed that a plug in vehicle is not at all suitable or workable for me. We just don’t have the infrastructure locally, I cannot charge from home and when I go on trips, I don’t want to be mucking about having to divert because chargers are not available/not working at my planned stop.

                  I only have limited energy and the last thing I would want/need to be doing is to be driving around to the next available charge point a few miles away from my planned stop and to do so, would put the whole trip at risk. Too many of those diversions and I would have to abort and return home or fork out for a place to rest. For current trips, I don’t have to worry about refuelling the car on the way, just that the place I stop has drinks and a loo available, not all charge points have loos and refreshments available and not all tea and wee places have charge points (well certainly not on my usual trips anyway)

                  For the moment, I will have to wait until I am in a suitable property with a driveway and the infrastructure/battery strength has improved.

                  #223008
                  Avatar photoAbercol
                  Participant

                    Great stuff. Also, just to further confuse you, EV Database does charging curves, these are interesting in that some cars can charge on a rapid (50kw and up) charger at relatively high speed until nearly full. The Ariya, for example, charges at a max of 130kw, Journalists say ooh, thats a bit low for a new car, but its charging curve sees it charge to 80 or even 95% faster than other cars with 150kw max charging speeds.

                    As spoken about earlier, the rapid charger max charging speed is often a bit of a misnomer as the speed is regulated by a lot of factors, ambient temperature, car battery temperature, car battery state of charge and how hot the battery gets whilst charging. So the graph starts out slowish, then quickly ramps to max speed, then tails off. This used to be at about 80% where it fell off a cliff, my Soul for example, gets a max of 78kw per hour, but drops to 34kw by 79% and 21kw at 80, by 85 its doing 12kw. So for me, charging much beyond 80% is pointless.

                    However, the Ariya, both battery sizes, charges above 50kw all the way to 98%  – so on a long trip it would charge faster than the Soul and also take more charge before needing to unplug.

                    Of course, you will only see the higher speeds on compatible chargers, a 100kw charger clearly can only deliver 100kw.

                    Long trips are not an issue with limited planning required – I made a 1200 mile trip to Kent from Scotland, it was easy and took just 30 minutes more than the same trip done by me in the past in diesels with no fuel stops. I used MSA’s and specified a minimum of 4 chargers, checked on Zap Map before I left & had no problems other than a wait of 5 mins at Gretna Green (I arrived at lunchtime – not the best, even petrol cars had to queue to park up). 3 charges each way on a 550mile journey, no charge took more than 35mins and the Soul EV is not a fast charging car. Stops were around 2 hours apart. The longest distance between stops was 190miles.

                     

                    In life, it's not who you know that's important, it's how your wife found out.

                    #223009
                    Avatar photoAbercol
                    Participant

                      Ha, looks like I was doing 95mph there…no, that 190 mile one was nearer 3 hours…

                      In life, it's not who you know that's important, it's how your wife found out.

                      #223011
                      MFillingham
                      Participant

                        Thanks @Abercol, the charging curve can make a huge difference and is something else to “nerd” about when choosing the right car.

                        There’s also the voltage system of the battery, the bigger the number, the quicker it charges.  The Ioniq 5 is one of a few cars fitted with an 800v battery.  That means that instead of feeling smug about 150kw charging it can power through at 350kw, performing its 20-80% sprint in 20 minutes assuming you can find a charger capable of keeping up.

                        This only really matters at the point of choosing, living with your car, it charges in the time it takes to charge, you just adjust your plans accordingly.

                        I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                        I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                        Mark

                        #223046
                        kezo
                        Participant

                          BEV’s have to have onboard chargers to convert AC to DC voltage when charging from your home charger (EVCP, there proper name). These onbord chargers rang from 7kW to 22kW. Even though most vehicles today come with 22kW on board chargers, it means nothing to the large majority of us. Thats because nearly all homes in the UK have a single phase (1pn) electricty supply, meaning the theoretically maximum of having a 7.4kW home charger. So why do European spec vehicles now come with 22kW on board chargers – simple really as the majority homes in th EU have three phase (3pn) electricity supplies, meaning they can charge 57-75% faster than us.

                          If your DNO requires you need what is called “minor works” carried out before having a home charger fitted, depending on the works needed it could be worthwhile requesting they install a three phase supply, to future proof your home and take advantage of the faster charging speeds (If the DNO only require your cut out changed from 60a to 100a, its very unlikely they will do it). I ntioned earlier that theoretically the maximum home charger will be a maximum of 7.4kW, however it is possible to have a 11kW home charger installed but, will be subject on your DNO to a harmonic test on your incoming electricity (very rare)

                           

                          Just to clear up a little bit of confusion on the Hyundai Ionic 5 77kW…

                          The useable battery size is is 72.4kW, regardless of the said 800V battery the Ionic 5 has a short maximum peak charge rate of 225kW at just below 50% SOC dependant on battery temperature and external influencies. Whils’t you can use 350Kw DC rapid charger it will throttle and the time difference using a 150kW charger is minimal.

                          The battery conditioning feature used by Hyundai/Kia in the 77kW battery has 50% faster charge time, bringing charging down from 35 minutes to 18 minutes, providing the SOC is 25% and the battery temperature doesn’t drop below 21c.

                          The Ionic 5   also has bidirectional charging allowing you to charge external device up to 3.6k ( V2H)

                           

                          #223056
                          John

                            I’m looking at a bev for my next car, but I wont have access to a home charger, so it will be public charging for me, looking at the bigger battery enyaq so 150kw 82kwh (125kw)

                            Looking at autotrader based on my average miles so around 200 a week, it says I will have to charge for 1 hour a week on a public charge.

                            Can anyone give me a ballpark price that it would cost me to charge the car for 1 hour?

                            Sorry if this seems a layman question but I have numerical dyslexia and anything I find on the old Internet just looks all jumbled up, and I can’t find anything that just says 1 hour that’s around say £30

                             

                            #223071
                            MFillingham
                            Participant

                              I’m looking at a bev for my next car, but I wont have access to a home charger, so it will be public charging for me, looking at the bigger battery enyaq so 150kw 82kwh (125kw) Looking at autotrader based on my average miles so around 200 a week, it says I will have to charge for 1 hour a week on a public charge. Can anyone give me a ballpark price that it would cost me to charge the car for 1 hour? Sorry if this seems a layman question but I have numerical dyslexia and anything I find on the old Internet just looks all jumbled up, and I can’t find anything that just says 1 hour that’s around say £30

                              Unfortunately you won’t find that answer because it’s not that easy.  Even saying 1 hour is somewhat generalised, charging rates are affected by a lot of factors including the car and the charger.  1 hour would be about empty to 90%ish on a good speed rapid charge.  The prices for that could be anywhere from 50p up to £1 per unit.  That’s a price between £35 and £80 for the full charge.  However, if there are slower chargers near enough, and with parking long enough, you could plug in for much longer and you could be looking at as little as £17 or even free if you find one of those very rare freebie chargers in a car park.  Skoda also have a Powerpass app that can find chargers where they have a reduced rate.  For a monthly fee they get some money knocked off the price per unit and, if all you can do is rapid charge weekly, that might be good value and there will be whatever arrangement Motability have at the time you get the new Enyaq for public charging, seeing as you won’t have a charger.  That again will save you some money off the price to charge.

                               

                              Have a look around home and, if you work, where you work.  There might be a 7kw charger you can jump on and charge whilst you’re doing something better with your time.

                               

                              I’d also not discount the Enyaq IV 60, the total difference in range between them averages to 59 miles in all conditions.  That’s 50 miles in the colder months less in the IV60 and 70 miles less in summer.  That’s for a £1,150 saving in AP.

                               

                              So, as you can see from that reply, it’s not a simple answer and I can easily  see why some people find it daunting when you’re looking at it for the first time.  However, congrats for deciding to go with it anyway, the Enyaq is a lovely car.

                              I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                              I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                              Mark

                              #223072
                              Fastbike1000
                              Participant

                                Don’t forget if you can’t have a charger fitted at your home address Motability will give you access to BP Pulse chargers, what the discount is for charging via the BP Pulse card/Motability I don’t know.

                                 

                                #223075
                                kezo
                                Participant

                                  BP Pulse if you can’t have a home charger or off street

                                  From what I understand, Motability will pay for a BP Pulse subscription for 3 years (normally £7.85 month) and you will pay a reduced rate as per kWh subscriper:

                                  As of February 2023, prices for subscribers start from 44p per kWh at AC chargers that provide speeds of up to 22kW. It costs subscribers 55p per kWh to use one of network’s 43kW AC and 50kW DC rapid chargers, or its DC ultra-rapid chargers that offer 150kW+ charging speeds. Prices then increase further if you are a registered or non registered PAYG user.

                                   

                                  Driving electrig guide to BP Pulse or you can look it up on BP’s site…

                                  https://www.drivingelectric.com/your-questions-answered/992/complete-guide-to-the-bp-pulse-formerly-polar-plus-charging-network#:~:text=As%20of%20February%202023%2C%20prices%20for%20subscribers%20start,%E2%80%93%20down%20from%2067p%20per%20kWh%20last%20year.

                                   

                                  #223077
                                  kezo
                                  Participant

                                    What you’ll get with your BP Pulse subscription When you can’t have a home charger fitted (Motability)

                                    https://www.motability.co.uk/whats-available/electric-cars/charging/public-charging/

                                    Do bare in mind electricity prices change every 3 months, so best to check on current rates at time of application.

                                     

                                    #223078
                                    MFillingham
                                    Participant

                                      The importance of using apps like zap map is that when you go looking for chargers, you can see the prices.  Whilst that won’t help you know how much the end cost will be you can find one near you that is the most reasonably priced.   For example, the nearest 2 spots to where I live are at 75p per killowatt.  However, the next nearest is at 56p and I have to drive directly past the other to get there.  Without that knowledge I’d be stopped in McDonalds car park paying nearly 20p per unit more, which could end up costing me £8 per charge extra.

                                       

                                      I understand when numbers can be a daunting prospect, especially when something as simple as driving a car becomes an exercise in mathematics and physics.  it’s like looking around the local petrol stations just to find the cheapest, you’ll get to know quite quickly but it’s always worth checking it all out.

                                      I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                      I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                      Mark

                                      #223134
                                      MFillingham
                                      Participant

                                        A response to the Rowan Atkinson article posted previously, not from me but one of the co-founders of Zap Map, one of the best mapping and route planning solutions for EVs.

                                         

                                        https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/jun/07/petrol-diesel-engines-technology-electric-cars

                                         

                                         

                                        I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                        I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                        Mark

                                        #223323
                                        MFillingham
                                        Participant

                                          I was surprised to see the Ioniq 6 appear on the scheme today.  Does anybody have any guesses what else may appear?

                                          With driving an electric car being smoother than a much more expensive version of an equivalent ICE, the Ioniq 6 must feel like the Merc it vaguely looks like or better?

                                           

                                           

                                          I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                          I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                          Mark

                                          #223324
                                          MFillingham
                                          Participant

                                            12 BEVs range tested in winter!! 3 to 6 degrees external temperature.

                                             

                                            <iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/GxGG5e-mTcY&#8221; title=”YouTube video player” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share” allowfullscreen></iframe>

                                            I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                            I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                            Mark

                                            #223325
                                            Rico
                                            Participant

                                              I’m looking at a bev for my next car, but I wont have access to a home charger, so it will be public charging for me, looking at the bigger battery enyaq so 150kw 82kwh (125kw) Looking at autotrader based on my average miles so around 200 a week, it says I will have to charge for 1 hour a week on a public charge. Can anyone give me a ballpark price that it would cost me to charge the car for 1 hour? Sorry if this seems a layman question but I have numerical dyslexia and anything I find on the old Internet just looks all jumbled up, and I can’t find anything that just says 1 hour that’s around say £30

                                              Unfortunately you won’t find that answer because it’s not that easy. Even saying 1 hour is somewhat generalised, charging rates are affected by a lot of factors including the car and the charger. 1 hour would be about empty to 90%ish on a good speed rapid charge. The prices for that could be anywhere from 50p up to £1 per unit. That’s a price between £35 and £80 for the full charge. However, if there are slower chargers near enough, and with parking long enough, you could plug in for much longer and you could be looking at as little as £17 or even free if you find one of those very rare freebie chargers in a car park. Skoda also have a Powerpass app that can find chargers where they have a reduced rate. For a monthly fee they get some money knocked off the price per unit and, if all you can do is rapid charge weekly, that might be good value and there will be whatever arrangement Motability have at the time you get the new Enyaq for public charging, seeing as you won’t have a charger. That again will save you some money off the price to charge. Have a look around home and, if you work, where you work. There might be a 7kw charger you can jump on and charge whilst you’re doing something better with your time. I’d also not discount the Enyaq IV 60, the total difference in range between them averages to 59 miles in all conditions. That’s 50 miles in the colder months less in the IV60 and 70 miles less in summer. That’s for a £1,150 saving in AP. So, as you can see from that reply, it’s not a simple answer and I can easily see why some people find it daunting when you’re looking at it for the first time. However, congrats for deciding to go with it anyway, the Enyaq is a lovely car.

                                              with out a home charger I would suggest a car with 22kw onboard simply because most pod points are 22kw, in our nipping to the supermarket and grabbing a quick thing in and out in 18 mins I will plug-in in as pod points are first 15 mins free so I return with about 10 miles more range than I left with. For free

                                              #223484
                                              MFillingham
                                              Participant

                                                with out a home charger I would suggest a car with 22kw onboard simply because most pod points are 22kw, in our nipping to the supermarket and grabbing a quick thing in and out in 18 mins I will plug-in in as pod points are first 15 mins free so I return with about 10 miles more range than I left with. For free

                                                 

                                                The local Pod Points to me are all 7.4kW chargers.  However, if one is close to you, the time saved might make the extra cost worth it.  It’s also worth noting that a lot of non rapid chargers in Europe are 22kW over the 7kW here.

                                                 

                                                Did anyone see the BBC Panorama 30 minutes piece on EVs the other day?  Has it swayed the undecided in any direction?

                                                I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
                                                I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

                                                Mark

                                                #223487
                                                Rico
                                                Participant

                                                  I will try to explain ovo a bit better here without my brain fog,

                                                  so I am on ovo standard tariff, which means I pay the same std rate as everyone else, but if you have a compatible ev or charger you can add the ovo charge anytime addon for free

                                                  How it works is you plug your car in and ovo will start and stop the charge on the car, they will then refund to your account a credit of anything over 10p a kw.

                                                  so if your electricity is 32p a kw and you charge 10 kw they will refund you £2.22 as credit to your account.

                                                  they start and stop the car based on grid usage, so when grid is low it starts, this is usually every night for about 5 hours and about 4 hours at random times during the day ( so maybe a hour here or an hour there)

                                                  why do I think this is these ev tariff?

                                                  well first there is no inflated peak price, you pay the standard rate like non ev owners do, which at the moment is 32.7p a kw. We’re other ev tariffs want more from you 🙁 for peak to give you cheaper night prices…

                                                  downside is your car needs to be compatible or charger

                                                  they also. Don’t discriminate as if you have a compatible plug-in hybrid that will also be allowed to use ovo charge anytime

                                                  #223490
                                                  Oscarmax
                                                  Participant

                                                    with out a home charger I would suggest a car with 22kw onboard simply because most pod points are 22kw, in our nipping to the supermarket and grabbing a quick thing in and out in 18 mins I will plug-in in as pod points are first 15 mins free so I return with about 10 miles more range than I left with. For free

                                                    The local Pod Points to me are all 7.4kW chargers. However, if one is close to you, the time saved might make the extra cost worth it. It’s also worth noting that a lot of non rapid chargers in Europe are 22kW over the 7kW here. Did anyone see the BBC Panorama 30 minutes piece on EVs the other day? Has it swayed the undecided in any direction?

                                                    Watching Panorama definitely put me off, an example I uploaded payment to our EV Online APP, they use Rolec EV chargers, over the past 18 months I have only managed to charge once, every other time the chargers are off line. Again I have uploaded payment to our Podpoint APP, the cheapest I can find is Tesco 7 kWh charger at 44 pence a kWh, it is more cost effective to use the ICE to power or charge up the PHEV.

                                                    EV chargers in our area are quite scarce, the majority are offline.

                                                    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Oscarmax.
                                                    #223496
                                                    kezo
                                                    Participant

                                                      Did anyone see the BBC Panorama 30 minutes piece on EVs the other day?  Has it swayed the undecided in any direction?

                                                      I would imagine as with anything BBC it swayed more people into not wanting one, but no I don’t watch BBC in general 🙂

                                                      I do think these type of shows tend to have an opposite effect than what they were initially set out to do.

                                                      #223500
                                                      kezo
                                                      Participant

                                                        The downfall to OVO’s drive anytime tarriff  is you need a “smart” capable charger to access the tariff. If youve had an EV for a couple of years or more the chances are your charger isn’t “smart”.  (Any home charger fitted after June 2022 had to be smart)

                                                        However I do like the idea of OVO’s tariff, as you are not limited to a 4hr window to charge your car,meaning you have essentially 24hrs, especially overnight when demand is low.

                                                         

                                                         

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