Not everyone can or wants to go fully electric just yet’

  • This topic has 37 replies, 10 voices, and was last updated 7 months ago by sif.
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #170520 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Steve Fowler highlights the importance hybrids have in the switch to fully electric cars

    We’re big fans of the Kia Niro – the car that really started to position the Korean brand as a major player in the fast-growing world of electric cars.

    The new model looks set to continue the good work of its predecessor by giving buyers the opportunity to taste electrification without having to go the whole hog; it’ll be available as a hybrid, plug-in hybrid or a full EV. I’m not sure that contrasting rear panel does it any favours, though.

    What is clear is that not everyone can or wants to go fully electric just yet, in spite of the proliferation of EVs from every major manufacturer. And hybrids do their bit to lower emissions and reduce running costs, while not relying on a plug and socket. Even if you do have easy access to charging, hybrids are ideal stepping stones on the road to full electrification.

    Hybrids are already being used to good effect in performance cars, too – and in Formula One. Driving some of the very latest performance hybrids feels like a natural evolution for fast cars rather than a step towards the eventual full electrification of sports cars.

    A number of you are asking whether you should buy a petrol car or an EV, and if there’s still place for (whisper it) diesel?

    The biggest barrier to EV ownership these days seems to be the UK’s public charging network, which is where our list of the best chargepoint providers can come in handy.

    But even still, the SMMT President George Gillespie said this week, “It is so frustrating to find broken chargers, blocked chargers, multiple apps and confusing payment schemes.” It’s clear that more needs to be done to increase and improve the UK’s EV charging network.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 37 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #170521 Reply
    Ian

    Yep.. non EV drivers seem obsessed with a shortage of chargers and imagine us coming to blows over who’s turn it is to plug in next

    In reality driving an EV is like having a mini petrol pump at home that gradually tops up your tank overnight whenever needed.

    Only ~6% of all charging is done at public chargers. The % of drivers that rely heavily on public chargers must be tiny. As borne out by the fact they’re nearly always available!

    #170534 Reply
    DumfriesDik
    Participant

    I agree @Ian I recently heard someone say that an EV is more polluting than their Land Rover! Because where does the electricity come from? How quickly people forget how diesel gets to the pumps from the oil fields.

    I can not wait to never visit a petrol station again – bring it on.

    Mazda CX5 is my DD
    VW ID3 Max on order 5 Nov 21

    #170536 Reply
    ajn

    EV’s seem to be  dummy place on the drive for the worried, yes things must change, but for the better not the hidden worst..

    #170537 Reply
    ajn

    Placed*

    #170541 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    Too cryptic for me!

     

    #170548 Reply
    Tim

    The EV on the drive is a pacifier in the mind for those feeling guilt or remorse for climate change?
    Other than that I’ve no idea what the message is 😂🤷‍♂️

    #170557 Reply
    ajn

    Must admit my post is a mystical maybe..

    Going full EV if possible for some would saving money on petrol prices so a huge plus.

    Then might give a sense of feeling to help climate change helping the environment, another plus..

    But please remember EV drivers you’ve put just as much pollution into the atmosphere as the next person with previously with motoring..

    However it would be impossible for me for a few years anyway..

    1, Only had my motability 20ltr petrol 12 months, so if I wanted to change, wanting to help climate change is not important enough reason to swap to EV,  also cost  me a fortune to do so, if I could change like for like car from petrol to EV/petrol combined or might just extend my lease at the end in 2 years time..

    2. I wouldn’t want anyway early days EV but would go petrol/ ev combined though.

    3. I cant see how the EV is going to be a total success…

    Also I think it’s causing just as much pollution to produce EV’s…

     

    #170578 Reply
    Daf

    ajn the basis of your premise is flawed.

    You seem to be saying that because you polluted in the past you shouldn’t try to clean up your act.

    You are also plain wrong in saying that producing EVs causes as much pollution as ICE cars.

    Like it or not EVs are currently the least polluting way to get from A to B and are significantly cheaper to do so.

    We have to concentrate on making it easy for as many people as possible to take advantage of this relatively non polluting technology.

    Making false claims about the green credentials of EVs doesn’t help.

    #170581 Reply
    ajn

    Oh ok then

    #170588 Reply
    ChrisK
    Participant

    #170611 Reply
    struth
    Participant

    read somewhere that volvo claim the petrol version of the 40 is overall less polluting than the electric one.

    Current Car: Hyundai Kona Premium EV...2 way 40kg hoist
    Last Car: Toyota C-HR Excel Hybrid...4 way 80kg hoist

    #170614 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    read somewhere that volvo claim the petrol version of the 40 is overall less polluting than the electric one.

    You may be correct than you think Struth, at present with the the current cold spell even with regularly plugging into the mains our Outlander PHEV fuel consumption has plummeted


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 PHEV

    #170615 Reply
    ajn

    Struth tbh for me it would be more about fuel savings…

     

    #170625 Reply
    Peter Ward

    I’d go full EV tomorrow if I could. Not just for the questionable environmental advantages but also it would suit my usage much better with lots of short journeys being made.

    Unfortunately I live 100 yards from my on street parking  so there’s zero chance of charging at home and I have no desire to be sitting around whilst out and about waiting for it to charge.

    I’d reckon on 5 to 10 years before widespread on street charging is the norm. So a hybrid is most likely my only option for the time being when renewal comes around, if I don’t extend.

    #170640 Reply
    MickC
    Participant

    I’m not going EV for the foreseable future,still got 30 months left on my current car.

    What i will do over those 30 months is watch the cost of electrickery rise,April 2022 will be a big kick in the nuts for everyone,after that who knows.

    I hope hydrogen gathers pace as an alternative.

    #170650 Reply
    DumfriesDik
    Participant

    I am not a green saviour, far from it. BUT get used to the idea of electric as you only have three contracts (9 years) and you’ll have to be electric or hybrid. And by then I suspect hybrids will be a dying breed. There some sweeteners out there just now and they will not last for ever I’m sure.

    Resistance is futile!

    Mazda CX5 is my DD
    VW ID3 Max on order 5 Nov 21

    #170652 Reply
    ajn

    Type my reg plate in Gov. mines classed as this, how ever in reality it’s the newest most expensive petrol drinking car I’ve ever driven, even in  nonsense ECO mode…

    Fact is progress is sometimes forced on even when it’s simply not progress in reality..

    #170658 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    ajn – that’s odd. I’ve started looking at new cars for one of my daughters and a lot of cars nowadays have a tiny electric motor that is really just used to help the stop/start process, as opposed to a proper self charging hybrid or PHEV. These cars are often listed as being hybrid, which is quite misleading as they clearly don’t make the car economical, as you have experienced. Could that be the case with your XC40?

    #170661 Reply
    ajn

    Yes Glos Guy, that’s right or so it seems..

    Also this is after the 1st service, should be run in by now and running at its full potential 🤨, it’s simply a gas guzzling misleading description.. IMO..

    #170662 Reply
    Tim

    I hear the XC40 is exceptionally thirsty.

    #170663 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Glos Guy, they are known as Mild Hybrids. The electric motor/generator replaces the starter motor and along with the battery makes a good job of stop/start, moving the car off from rest using electricity.

    I can’t speak about any fuel saving but from two I’ve been in, they are very quiet, smooth and civilised in town traffic. I like them.

    #170664 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    I hear the XC40 is exceptionally thirsty.

    The B4-P petrol one certainly is compared to its peers, but the PHEV one seems to be very economical. In one group test that I read the Ford Kuga PHEV was the most economical by some margin (against the XC40 and Peugeot 3008 PHEV’s) but I don’t think that anyone on this forum has taken delivery of one yet (unless I’ve missed it).

    #170665 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    Glos Guy, they are known as Mild Hybrids. The electric motor/generator replaces the starter motor and along with the battery makes a good job of stop/start, moving the car off from rest using electricity. I can’t speak about any fuel saving but from two I’ve been in, they are very quiet, smooth and civilised in town traffic. I like them.

    Thanks Wigwam. It’s good to know that I was on the right track! I think that a self charging hybrid might be the best for my daughter as she doesn’t have the ability to charge at home, but I haven’t really started looking properly yet, so all info is appreciated.

    #170666 Reply
    struth
    Participant

    the chr is an excellent car with lots of safety kit and great fuel economy. looks good and up here anyway there are now lots of women driving them. seems now to be very popular although when i got mine it was one of the few like the raf, lol.

    Current Car: Hyundai Kona Premium EV...2 way 40kg hoist
    Last Car: Toyota C-HR Excel Hybrid...4 way 80kg hoist

    #170669 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    the chr is an excellent car with lots of safety kit and great fuel economy. looks good and up here anyway there are now lots of women driving them. seems now to be very popular although when i got mine it was one of the few like the raf, lol.

    Yes the CHR is a nice looking car Struth, but is a bit expensive. My daughter is also leaning towards a hatchback again. She has a Hyundai i20 at present so a new model i20 mild hybrid or an Ioniq self charging hybrid are the obvious options if she stays with Hyundai, but she owns the i20 outright so is not tied to that brand. As I say, it’s early days and the only feature that she’s told me she wants is a heated steering wheel 😂

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 37 total)
Reply To: Reply #170650 in Not everyone can or wants to go fully electric just yet’
Your information: