Norway will install the world’s first wireless electric car charging stations fo

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    Brydo
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    Norway’s capital city of Oslo will be the world’s first metropolitan area to install wireless, induction-based charging stations for electric taxis, in a bid to make a zero-emission cab system by as early as 2023, according to Reuters. Norway wants to go even further than that, however, and is mandating that all new cars sold in the country be all-electric by 2025.

    To pull off the taxi charging system, Norway is tapping Finnish utilities firm Fortum, which is working with US company Momentum Dynamics and the municipal government of Oslo to install charging plates in the road that connect to energy receivers in the vehicles themselves. The goal is to make it as easy as possible to charge electric taxis, as doing so now is cumbersome, time-consuming, and expensive. Using induction, which is more energy efficient, the taxis can be charged as they wait in what’s known as a taxi rank, or a slow-moving queue where cabs line up to wait for passengers.

    Here’s how Fortum describes the system working in its press announcement:

    The project aims to install wireless charging using induction technology. Charging plates are installed in the ground where the taxi is parked and a receiver is installed in the taxi. This allows for charging up to 75 kilowatts. The project will be the first wireless fast-charging infrastructure for electric taxis anywhere in the world, and will also help the further development of wireless charging technology for all EV drivers.

    Fortum Charge & Drive has long been working with the taxi industry to enable electrification of the taxi fleet. The greatest hurdle has proved to be the infrastructure: It is too time consuming for taxi drivers to find a charger, plug in and then wait for the car to charge. The wireless fast-charging project aims to solve these issues and thereby reduce climate emissions from the taxi sector – not only in Norway, but in the entire world.

    “The future is electric, and it is already here, right now. Wireless charging is a potential game changer,” said Sture Portvik, Oslo’s electro mobility manager, in a statement. “From 2023 onward, all taxis in Oslo will be zero emission. Together with the taxi industry we will make sure that the shift is as user friendly and efficient as possible. Oslo will always be at the front of innovation and we are delighted to join forces with two of the industry’s most progressive players in this game-changing move to launch the world’s most ambitious plan for wireless charging of a taxi fleet.”

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

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    Donkey Oatie

    Good idea, don’t get a taxi if you have a pacemaker though!!!! 🙂 I am sure that this has been thought out though.

    #86178 Reply
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    Brydo
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    I hope so.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #86182 Reply
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    Tomas (Tomas)

    Norway are so far ahead of us when it comes to EV’s.

    A mate of mine who lives in Norway drives a Tesla which is subsidised by their government. He says that it works out far more cheaper than an average car.

    Why can’t our government be so proactive.

    #86193 Reply
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    Brydo
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    https://insideevs.com/news/343459/top-10-countries-in-the-global-ev-revolution-2018-edition/

    Top 10 Countries In The Global EV Revolution: 2018 Edition

    Which countries are leading the charge?
    Welcome to my fifth annual Top Countries list! The disclaimer, same as in last 2 years:

    The score is multi-faceted rather than representing solely consumer sales, and
    This is a global challenge, to which different countries can contribute in different ways, and the big picture must be in view.
    The lion’s share of credit for source data goes as usual, to Jose Pontes and his EV Sales Blog. The EU-sanctioned eafo.eu also helped a lot, which is run by the FIER Automotive & Mobility consortium; guess who is a partner on that site? (yup, the very same Jose). Some data arrives from insideevs.com, in particular its excellent US EV sales report card, and some from my own online sleuthing. Some numbers and percentages in Europe may look different from what you see elsewhere, because I’ve added light-commercial (LCV) sales to numerator and denominator, to make the comparison with North America equitable – and also due to additional context-driven tweaks.

     

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

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