New 2020 plug-in Skoda Octavia vRS iV confirmed for Geneva reveal

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Noel 1 month ago.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #107740 Reply

    Brydo

    A hot hybrid Octavia is heading to Geneva with vRS iV branding and 242bhp expected
    Skoda has confirmed that the next-generation Octavia vRS will star at next week’s Geneva Motor Show, using plug-in hybrid power.

    The Czech marque’s latest hot hatchback will go on sale in the UK in autumn this year, likely badged vRS iV. Prices are expected to start from around £32,000. It’ll appear in Geneva alongside a further plug-in hybrid Octavia iV model – bringing the total number of plug-in Octavias to three.

    A new teaser video gives us a glimpse inside the newcomer, while also confirming that both hatchback and estate versions are due to be revealed next week. Extensive spy shots of the newcomer give the game away though, while our exclusive images preview the final car.

    The new Skoda Octavia vRS iV plug-in hybrid will use the same turbocharged 1.4-litre four-cylinder petrol engine as the recently launched Golf GTE. No performance figures have been confirmed for the hot hybrid, but Auto Express understands that the new electrically-assisted model is being tuned to match the output of the petrol vRS model. In all likelihood it will match the 242bhp figure of the hot plug-in Golf, too.

    Senior company sources have told Auto Express that the PHEV-powered Octavia vRS iV will join Skoda’s existing range of petrol- and diesel-powered vRS models – giving it the Czech brand’s widest range of high-performance powertrains to date.

    Skoda has always employed a loose definition of what constitutes a hot hatch. The previous generation Octavia vRS model was offered in a wide range of different forms – buyers could have either a hatchback or estate bodystyle, two- or four-wheel drive and even a diesel engine, which acted as a more efficient alternative to the flagship turbo petrol variant.

    The petrol-powered Octavia vRS will use the turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol motor from the Volkswagen Group’s ubiquitous EA888 family. It will match the new Mk8 Golf GTI in developing 242bhp and 370Nm of torque.

    Assuming that the 1.4 TSI engine in the Skoda Octavia vRS iv produces the same 148bhp as it does in the Golf GTE, that would leave around 100bhp to be developed by the electric motor, which will be situated, as usual, between the car’s engine and gearbox.

    The total system torque is expected to be around 400Nm – enough to get the car (which will have a dual-clutch automatic gearbox and no manual option) from 0-62mph in less than seven seconds.

    Perhaps a bigger challenge for the Skoda team will be keeping the Octavia vRS iV PHEV’s weight down and maintaining handling agility. The car will have a battery of at least 13kWh and this, coupled with the extra motor, will add more than 250kg to the kerbweight.

    As such, expect the vRS iV to be slightly slower in a straight line than the petrol version. But equally, that battery will give it the ability to go for about 30 miles on electricity alone – potentially giving the Octavia vRS iV a key advantage over rivals like the Ford Focus ST.

    The Octavia vRS diesel will continue to use the existing EA288 motor with up to 197bhp. Skoda is said to have ruled out fitting the twin-turbocharged version of this engine, which is currently used in the Kodiaq vRS, where it makes 237bhp.

Viewing 6 replies - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #107755 Reply

    Elliot
    Participant

    Am I correct in saying that when you have used up the 20 odd electric miles, that you are left with a 148 bhp petrol engine to propel you around until you recharge?

    #107757 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Am I correct in saying that when you have used up the 20 odd electric miles, that you are left with a 148 bhp petrol engine to propel you around until you recharge?

    Elliot the Superb will do nearer the 30 mark on pure electric mode only, if you leave the settings alone it will do nearer 100 miles in combination with the ICE unit plus any regenerative input.

    brydo should be along later he is much better at explaining hybrid systems.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #107768 Reply

    72 dudes

    The 30 miles is an absolute maximum on a full charge.

    You are correct in that you are left with a 148 BHP petrol engine once all charge is depleted.

    In between times, the electric motor assists the engine to make the overall efficiency better. Regenerative braking is used which can replace some charge into the battery.

    Plug-in hybrids are especially good for people who do frequent short journeys, but to get the best from them, they must be charged up regularly.

    Long journeys with a depleted battery is pointless in a PHEV, as you are left with a relatively thirsty petrol engine

    Witness the long term What Car? Volvo XC90 T8 PHEV which averaged 30.5 MPG!

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  JS. Reason: Changed typo
    #107778 Reply

    Elliot
    Participant

    Thanks 72 dudes for clearing that up.

    #107784 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    The 30 miles is an absolute maximum on a full charge. You are correct in that you are left with a 148 BHP petrol engine once all charge is depleted. In between times, the electric motor assists the engine to make the overall efficiency better. Regenerative braking is used which can replace some charge into the battery. Plug-in hybrids are especially good for people who do frequent short journeys, but to get the best from them, they must be charged up regularly. Long journeys with a depleted battery is pointless in a PHEV, as you are left with a relatively thirsty petrol engine Witness the long term What Car? Volvo XC90 T8 PHEV which averaged 30.5 MPG!

    The Volvo XC90 T8 PHEV is a very large SUV capable of towing a 2400kg caravan, compare its fuel consumption to similar powered SUV like the BMW X5 and Range Rover diesel is not bad.

    I have added a long term link for the new 2.4 Mitsubishi outlander PHEV

    https://www.greencarguide.co.uk/car-reviews-and-road-tests/mitsubishi-outlander-phev-4wd-2019-review/


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #107789 Reply

    Noel

    I had a MINI PHEV for 48 hrs, the battery ran out in 30 mins so for 47 1/2 hours it was running on a 1.5 underpowered petrol engine. No amount of energy recuperation will make up for plugging it in, and if you can’t plug it in or need to travel more than 20 to 30 miles it will not do 100mpg it will do 25mpg

Viewing 6 replies - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
Reply To: New 2020 plug-in Skoda Octavia vRS iV confirmed for Geneva reveal

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Your information: