Mercedes A250e

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  • #145148 Reply
    Jamie

    Hey Everyone,

    Was just wondering if anyone had gone ahead and ordered the A250e?

    I know the AP is quite high but the proclaimed ‘250mpg’ is quite attractive no? Even if you got half of that then surely you would be saving money on fuel in the long run?

    Let me know what you guys think

Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 59 total)
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  • #145264 Reply
    Richard

    @wigwam There’s no need rewrite the laws of physics batteries like that are coming. Samsung have a new battery due out very soon that doubles energy density, so same capacity but half the current weight so the car would also go further on the same size battery or same weight but double the range.

    Outside of that the guy that invented the lithium cell John B Goodenough (absolute legend & genius & the best name ever) his lab are working on glass batteries that have something like 8x capacity & do charge in minutes vs hours.

    There’s quite abiy of info out there on these glass batteries & despite the glass they’re much safer as the electrolyte is not flammable.

    So this stuff is coming might be a few more years but I think we are on the cusp of some truly breathtaking battery tech

    #145265 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    5p per kWh makes all the difference, presumably needs a smart meter?

    #145267 Reply
    Richard

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>You’ve also got to bear in mind a number of these public chargers are at the moment often free to use or subsidised or on a day out you’re getting “free” parking whilst charging. Given parking here is £1.50 per hour or £7 for 24 hours (coastal pay & display) they have free eV charging & free parking whilst charging its a bit of a bargain if you were going to visit the coast anyway.</p>
    Not only are you getting free fuel but also free parking because you’re charging that’s a total no brainer lol

    On Octopus Agility sometimes the electricity price goes negative, ie they pay you to take it so if you can take advantage of that with your car you can save even more. Its all about the right energy co, tariff & planning

    #145271 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>

    5p per kWh makes all the difference, presumably needs a smart meter?

    yes. But they are free of charge. A bit if agro at the start. Smart meter and charging point. Then if you are careful and with a bit if planning the savings soon accumulate.</p>

    #145274 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    What I don’t like about smart meters is they have a stonking great 100A isolating relay in them.  They can switch you off…

    #145275 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    A petrol engine car achieving 40 mpg over 8,000 miles at today current fuel cost = £1136 over a 3 year lease = £3408

    An EV achieving 4.6 miles a kWh @ 5 pence kWh over 8000 miles = £86.96 over a 3 year lease = £260.88

    The difference a saving of £3147.12

     


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #145279 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    Although I don’t claim to understand all of the last dozen or so posts, they do rather confirm my view that, at present, running an EV (if you do long journeys) is very complicated and sounds a right faff, having to forward think and forward plan journeys and/or make stops when and where I wouldn’t want to. Fine for the first few months when it’s all new and fancy, but I think the novelty of that would wear off very quickly and rapidly turn into a right pain in the derrière. I’d also have to invest in a scientific calculator to fathom all those complex kw calculations!

    I was very interested to read about the new technologies that might, in time, eradicate the current limitations of EV’s but, for now, I find a 5 minute stop at a petrol station once every 3 weeks hassle enough. I realise that I am paying more for the privilege of that ultimate convenience, but the only figure that I need look at is the price per litre, which I can cope with 😂

    #145280 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    And, of course, Glos Guy, you are doing you bit (every three weeks) to support the economy, unlike these tax avoiding EV folk!

    #145281 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    5p per kWh makes all the difference, presumably needs a smart meter?

    I presume so, but the cars and the chargers can also be programmed to only charge at certain times.

    Let’s do the math… Octopus does a tariff with 4 hours at 5p kWh, so being conservative, in that 4 hours you will hopefully get around 25kW (Most chargers seem to deliver about 6.4kWh, but will slow the rate as they get closer to 100% charge).

    So, overnight, you have had 25kW, and the car is giving you 4 miles a kW, that’s 100 miles range added every night if you only charge at the 5p rate, that is 36000 miles of driving a year at 1.25p a mile.  Yes, occasionally you’ll need more than that on some days, others you won’t, plus pop to Aldi, Tesco or Waitrose for your shopping and plug in there free for a bit more  free energy. Longer journeys, at the moment, unless you can get free power, BP Pulse seems to be the cheapest option at 15p kWh on their 50kWh DC fast chargers (20-80% in less than an hour on a 64kWh battery).

    Sadly I can’t get a charger, but I’m managing just over 2p a mile, if you can have a charger and want to save money, it’s really not that difficult, add solar panels to the house and you’re laughing all the way to the bank!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #145283 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Ah, if only. Our last house had 40ft of unobstructed roof at the back facing south. Our current one has no clear length of roof facing anywhere.

    #145285 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    And, of course, Glos Guy, you are doing you bit (every three weeks) to support the economy, unlike these tax avoiding EV folk!

    Well anyone that doesn’t do there best to avoid paying tax is an idiot!  In the end, thats all an accountant does for you.

    In the end, those that understand the figures and are happy for a little bit of extra thought and planning can save lots of money right now.  No doubt this will have to change in the future, but for now, why pay tax you don’t have too.  I’m sure HMRC would be happy for you to pay for your tax disc rather than get it free because you’re disabled after all!

    Look at Oscarmax’s example;

    8000 miles a year resulting in a £1000 a year saving, or £20 a week,
    that’s only driving 154 miles a week, at 40mph average, that’s just under 4 hours driving, so you could be earning £5 an hour by going electric 😉

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #145286 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    And, of course, Glos Guy, you are doing you bit (every three weeks) to support the economy, unlike these tax avoiding EV folk!

    😂 The savings that Oscarmax illustrates are impressive, but of course that’s only part of the picture. You have to deduct from that saving the premium that you pay for an EV in the first place. Also, fuel isn’t the main cost of a Motability car. The main cost is sacrificed benefits (circa £10k over the lease) and the second (for many of us) is the AP plus options. So, using Oscarmax’s example (plus those major costs), the least cost for my next petrol Motability car would be circa £17k (£10k PIP, £4K AP with options, £3k fuel) versus £14k for an EV, even if the EV was exactly the same AP as the petrol equivalent. That’s a total overall cost saving of around 18% and less if the AP for the EV is more.

    For me, I’d rather pay the extra £1k a year for the ultimate convenience and zero hassle factor, but I realise that for others that £1k may be critical – and then, of course, there are the environmental considerations which are far less easy to argue against. We are making a very small contribution by moving to petrol after many years of diesels, but I appreciate that isn’t going to be good enough in the future and I look forward to embracing an EV when the technology catches up and matches how we use our car.

    #145287 Reply
    Richard

    Don’t blame EV owners (who paid a premium to get one anyway vs cost of similar spec ICE) blame the gov who control all these things.

    #145288 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    The savings that Oscarmax illustrates are impressive, but of course that’s only part of the picture. You have to deduct from that saving the premium that you pay for an EV in the first place. Also, fuel isn’t the main cost of a Motability car. The main cost is sacrificed benefits (circa £10k over the lease) and the second (for many of us) is the AP plus options. So, using Oscarmax’s example (plus those major costs), the least cost for my next petrol Motability car would be circa £17k (£10k PIP, £4K AP with options, £3k fuel) versus £14k for an EV, even if the EV was exactly the same AP as the petrol equivalent. That’s a total overall cost saving of around 18% and less if the AP for the EV is more.

    Totally lost me there… what was the breakdown for the EV?

    PHEV’s are totally overpriced on Motability, the AP’s across the board are way to high for it to make any sense for most people, but I’d argue that the current EV’s have most of the essentials, even luxuries that most disabled people want.  Paraplegics aren’t well catered for, not sure if the MG5 would be as good to transfer to as a Mondeo though.

    Your main objection to EV though and your reasoning I can fully understand, especially if milage is low and funds aren’t tight, for me, if BMW still had diesels in abundance on the scheme, I would have gone for an X1, X2 or 2 series Active, they are great cars, sadly though, at 20k a year, petrol isn’t an option, so that left me with expensive AP for one of the few decent diesels, Hybrid/petrol and hoping that the claimed MPG was something near what they claim (doubtful) or accepting a new way of thinking and going EV, it is different, and there is a bit more planning for long journeys, but the 8k a year driver, should not really find that difficult!

    • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Intranicity.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #145290 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    I might as well stop making light hearted comments on here. There’s always someone who wants to be needlessly defensive.

    #145292 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    The savings that Oscarmax illustrates are impressive, but of course that’s only part of the picture. You have to deduct from that saving the premium that you pay for an EV in the first place. Also, fuel isn’t the main cost of a Motability car. The main cost is sacrificed benefits (circa £10k over the lease) and the second (for many of us) is the AP plus options. So, using Oscarmax’s example (plus those major costs), the least cost for my next petrol Motability car would be circa £17k (£10k PIP, £4K AP with options, £3k fuel) versus £14k for an EV, even if the EV was exactly the same AP as the petrol equivalent. That’s a total overall cost saving of around 18% and less if the AP for the EV is more.

    Totally lost me there… what was the breakdown for the EV?

    The EV figure of £14k in the example I gave assumed the same AP plus options as the petrol car I have ordered (£4K) plus the £10k sacrificed benefits, which everyone pays regardless of fuel choice. The point being that fuel (or electric) is only a part of the cost of running a Motability car and you don’t sacrifice any less benefits getting an EV than you do an ICE car, so you have to look at overall running costs when comparing differences, not just one aspect.

    I can fully understand the choice that you made though and I hope that it all works out for you. As I say, once the hassle factor is eventually eliminated (which it will be) I genuinely look forward to embracing an EV. The quiet driving experience very much appeals, given that the only cars that I really enjoy the sound of their engines don’t appear on the Motability scheme, nor ever will!

    #145293 Reply
    ajn

    @Jamie are you taking all this in, or have you been scared off, some here  get a bit of self importance creeping in, usually it’s always the same names👀

    🌻

     

    #145299 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    @Jamie are you taking all this in, or have you been scared off, some here get a bit of self importance creeping in, usually it’s always the same names👀 🌻

    Hey Everyone, Was just wondering if anyone had gone ahead and ordered the A250e? I know the AP is quite high but the proclaimed ‘250mpg’ is quite attractive no? Even if you got half of that then surely you would be saving money on fuel in the long run? Let me know what you guys think

    Personal opinion, PHEV’s unless you do very short runs 95% of the time are not worth the AP.

    If you want a Mercedes that runs on electric, hope that the EQA comes along soon (There are rumours on here that it is) or go for any of the other great EV’s available if you want to save money, with a little bit of effort, you can save a fortune, well in excess of the AP, which on the whole are less for an EV than a PHEV.

    The next 12 months will see some interesting new EV’s coming hopefully.

    In short, the A250e PHEV unless your life fits around the 20 mile commute will probably cost you more than getting a standard ICE A Class, once you take the AP into consideration

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #145303 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    I might as well stop making light hearted comments on here. There’s always someone who wants to be needlessly defensive.

    It is important that such comments and senses of humour continue in what is becoming an increasingly political correct world.

    Returning to thread, PHEV´s in my view only make sense if they are used for short journeys, in many cases once the car shifts to petrol mode, consumption is high. EV´s make more sense if a home charger can be fitted and for those who rarely do more than 250 miles in a day, and, depending on the AP could make economic sense.  For the typical sales rep, 20000 plus miles pa, electric is not there yet, but I have a feeling in a couple of years we will see ranges pushing 500 miles. There is scope for manufacturers to discount, evident by the price reductions seen since the lowering of the price cap by the government.

    #145304 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    EV´s make more sense if a home charger can be fitted and for those who rarely do more than 250 miles in a day, and, depending on the AP could make economic sense. For the typical sales rep, 20000 plus miles pa, electric is not there yet,

    Tend to agree that they probably wouldn’t suit a sales rep, although, 250 miles a day x 5 day week, x 46 working weeks a year is 57.5k a year!  Makes you think!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #145308 Reply
    Rico
    Participant

    ID.3 tour pro is cheaper than this car and has a 300 plus range, reading through the reviews the car can do almost 300 miles on a single charge. The ID3 has been rated as the most efficient ev so far, as even if temp is -15 outside what milage it says when you get in the car is what you will get.

    #145309 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    I might as well stop making light hearted comments on here. There’s always someone who wants to be needlessly defensive.

    I agree with fwippers. Keep ‘em coming! Sadly nowadays some people ‘wait to be offended’ or attempt to weave politics into everything! Worse still are those who sit on the sidelines and don’t contribute constructively to a discussion but just hurl insults at those who do. I like reading comments from those with opposing views as it makes for a more informed discussion, can increase knowledge and at times change opinions.

    #145310 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    ID.3 tour pro is cheaper than this car and has a 300 plus range, reading through the reviews the car can do almost 300 miles on a single charge. The ID3 has been rated as the most efficient ev so far, as even if temp is -15 outside what milage it says when you get in the car is what you will get.

    where did you see that? Agree it is efficient, around the same as the e-Niro and Kona, but no better. I’m unsure about claims that temp don’t effect its range, certainly Bjorn Nyland tests don’t reflect that. Still a great car though

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #145312 Reply
    Glos Guy
    Participant

    Tend to agree that they probably wouldn’t suit a sales rep, although, 250 miles a day x 5 day week, x 46 working weeks a year is 57.5k a year! Makes you think!

    That’s almost exactly the daily commute that I had! It was only for two years and was in a fully expensed BMW 530d, but it nearly killed me, especially as I had a long, high pressure day in the middle of it. I can’t think of any car on the Motability scheme that I’d be happy doing that sort of mileage in, no matter what it’s powered by!

    #145317 Reply
    ajn

    Keep em coming, just don’t hurl them.

    🤣😂

    🌻

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