Marmite or Brexit, the EV dilemma 

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  • #140092 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    I find it interesting reading the comments on the future of UK motoring, and can’t quite work out how the human mind works, it’s definitely a case of the Marmite Love it or Hate it mindset, liberally sprinkled with a few who want to adjust their tastebuds. Or would Brexit be a better analogy, which camp are you in?

    In the end, we have very little choice anyway, it is the future and I do agree with the main argument, that as yet, the charging infrastructure is still immature and much more complicated than it could be, having to sign up to many different schemes, reminds me of loyalty cards, most are happy to do so to save a bit but some will not for their own (Often valid) reasons.

     

    Range also a big issue, but now cars that can cover 250 miles plus are starting to be the norm, I really can’t see much of an issue, most of us can’t drive for over 4 hours without a break, and even if you can, you probably shouldn’t!  Plus, in all honestly, how many days a year do you need anywhere close to that range?

     

    Some say they are all boring and bland, but many have great low end performance, and more than capable of going past the legal limits, and when you look high end, the Porsche Taycan shows just how good EV can be. They’re far too heavy is another one, yes, they have added weight, but it’s low down and should help with stability, 65ltrs of petrol weighs 50kg, do you only drive with minimum fuel you need to save you lugging the extra weight around?

     

    The cold is also an issue, some older models are shocking, but many cars are coming with battery heaters to help alleviate this problem.

    Planning seems to be the key, something we used to do pre Sat Nav days, who remembers using AA Autoroute to plan out their journeys?

    I guess for me, I love Marmite, and having weighed up the pros and cons (for me living in a flat and not being able to have a wall box and covering 20k miles a year over fuel costs) I think I’m more than happy with the extra planning and a little bit of inconvenience to save a huge amount of money and hopefully help the environment.  I just need the e-Niro to come on the scheme and I’ll happily wave a fond farewell to ICE.

    So, what camp are you in, and what are your issues/concerns?

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

Viewing 14 replies - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #140101 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    One other advantage I didn’t add is they are all automatics, which once the market starts maturing will surely be a benefit to many on here in that the annoying current situation of the ideal car only being available as a manual version.

    How long will it be until people forget how to use a manual gearbox, or are even taught to use one and pass their test in an Auto and then unable to drive a manual?

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #140120 Reply
    sif

    You will still be able to drive a manual, on a day trip to an auto museum, and rightly so.

    #140126 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    You will still be able to drive a manual, on a day trip to an auto museum, and rightly so.

    Only if you passed your test in a manual, if you take your test in an automatic, you can only drive an auto

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #140145 Reply
    DBtruth
    Participant

    I wouldn’t say I’m in either camp as I enjoy ICE cars and my interest in EV’s is growing all the time. I don’t think EV’s are perfect yet but I’ve got no doubt that they will be in time. I know some are worried about this 2030 cut off date but I think it’s good to keep in mind that every single EV on sale today will not be available to buy new in 2030. Most of them will have probably had two new versions by then and none of us know how good they’ll be. I am certainly looking forward to finding out

    #140151 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Yes, the versions available now will be very different to the cars available in just a few years. Stellantis (PSA) are already talking about the next e-208 being electric only, based on a new electric only platform.

    Currently batteries add a lot of weight to protect the battery itself, but the aim is to integrate the battery into the structure of the car so 3 floors are no longer needed (battery base, battery top, car floor.. oh and the plastic shield under the lot). On top of that, the current batteries are made up of modules that are again protected by an outer aluminium shell. Maybe we’ll see the lower energy density Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries become more popular again as they are very difficult to get to burn (cut them in half & they still won’t ignite), the idea being that they need a lot less protection.

    #140152 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Any EV you buy now is likely to have a very tired battery by 2030, and very low residual value.

    #140154 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Any fossil you buy now is likely to have a very tired engine by 2030, and very low residual value.

     

    With the EVs you can hope for at least 70% battery capacity, with the liquid cooled batteries maybe 85%.

     

    #140156 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Any fossil you buy now is likely to have a very tired engine by 2030, and very low residual value. With the EVs you can hope for at least 70% battery capacity, with the liquid cooled batteries maybe 85%.

    Love the response, such a shame theres no like button!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #140159 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    I would expect better of gothitjulie. Why would an ICE be very tired after 9 years?  I have a 17 year old car and a 25 year old car out there which are entirely able to cover 100% of the distance they did when new and they’re not special.

    No chance of that with a 9 year old EV.

     

     

     

    #140192 Reply
    vinalspin
    Participant

    Huge savings compared to ice cars won’t last forever, once the market starts to get near 50/50 the costs for running an EV will be the same as petrol or diesel, no way the government is going to give up the billions in taxes just because they run on electric.

    #140194 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Road pricing is on the way.  It is being prepared as we speak. The technology is in place already in every recent car.

    #140207 Reply
    Bandit
    Participant

    ICE is definitely the steam of today. However, is EV the Betamax or the VHS? There’s still an increasing investment in hydrogen research and production and I think if they can nail it then that will turn out to be the preferred option for most people.

    #140210 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    ICE is definitely the steam of today. However, is EV the Betamax or the VHS? There’s still an increasing investment in hydrogen research and production and I think if they can nail it then that will turn out to be the preferred option for most people.

    In the UK, hydrogen fuel costs between £10 and £15 per kg (it’s measured in kg rather than litres). That means filling a Hyundai Nexo’s 6.33kg tank, which offers around 414 miles of range will cost anywhere between £63 and £95, that’s 15-23p a mile and the Nexo is around £65k

    The technology is great, and still has a lot of development to go, but BEV’s currently cost less than 5p a mile, the current price of Hydrogen makes petrol attractive in the cost stakes, at 23p a mile, thats like driving a car that does 20mpg!

    I have no idea if Hydrogen prices would drop dramaticaly if in wider use?

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by Intranicity.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #140216 Reply
    rox
    Blocked

    There’s always going to be other alternatives to electic, I prefer marmalade. I don’t believe 100% the help save the environment push and wouldn’t it be quite funny if we entered an iceage soon.

    This planet we live on has heated up and cooled before on a cycle too big for humans to comprehend, but those at the top will exploit us if they can and they will over and over..  The car will forever be the cash cow till they outlaw them, then it will be us, because we polute just by living..

    Mini are stopping using leather but will create and use stuff worse for the enviroment and more synthetic and plastic will be created with the fossil fuels, we no longer use. How long has man been burning fuel of some sort to stay warm and cook with and using animals and eating animals but now they gonna be grown in labs also.. Who benefits from it all..

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