Interesting ‘stuff’

  • This topic has 245 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago by ajn.
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  • #159722 Reply
    Georgie

    I thought it might be a good idea if I bit the bullet and just started a Thread dedicated to (what I hope is) general ‘Interesting Stuff’ that doesn’t fit under other existing Threads, rather than keep hijacking the existing ones (as I am want to do at an appalling rate.  Sorry).

    Fulfilling an earlier promise, here is a quick bit of poetry first:

    They say the sea is cold, but the sea contains
    the hottest blood of all, and the wildest, the most urgent.

    (‘Whales Weep Not’ by D. H. Lawrence)

    https://neal.fun/deep-sea/?fbclid=IwAR1RK4skwk7tIXw9XocFTkOWblwAYftXvy2YbXVfngsgF8H-qPqiGzRXOwM

     

Viewing 25 replies - 126 through 150 (of 245 total)
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  • #166761 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Utterly brilliant! I want one. Only improvement would be to run the pump(s) mechanically from the flywheel of a V8.

    #166774 Reply
    Georgie

    We did wonder what might be lurking under the table.  DH also mooted a V8. 🙂

    #167442 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Saw on the telly that government is to spend hundreds of millions of quid on things called Community Diagnostic Centres (CDCs). These will provide diagnoses for many conditions and refer on where needed.

    A government report says:
    GPs will be able to refer patients to a centre so they can access life-saving checks closer to home and be diagnosed for a range of conditions, rather than travelling to hospital. This will be more convenient for patients, more efficient and more resilient to the risk of cancelled tests in hospitals due to COVID-19. 

    Well, do we not already have these capabilities? These functions are provided by GPs and NHS hospitals working together. Also they will be more convenient will they? My nearest hospital: two miles. Nearest CDC: 30 miles. And they are going to make the CDC’s completely immune to Covid, are they? That’ll be good; perhaps we could extend the miracle to the rest of society then?

    Forgive my cynicism but I think this is just another step in the plan to completely privatise the UK’s healthcare and do away with the NHS. The CDCs already in place are set up and run by private healthcare specialists who sell the service to the NHS. So, when the government finally gets rid of troublesome GPs and surgeons who stubbornly put patient welfare before politics and budget, it will be much easier to swing everything over into private ownership and start charging sick people for their healthcare.

    #167445 Reply
    joss
    Moderator

    Bit by bit the NHS is gradually been privatised. Under the guise of helping to clear the back log of these services. It is the end result that matters. When we have been scanned to death and found to need urgent treatment that the NHS can not meet. But hey, if the NHS can’t do your urgent care, we can $$$$$$$$$

    Joss
    Current car BMW X2 2.0i Sport sDrive Auto 2019 with Sport pack
    Last car Ford Focus Titanium 1.5 TDCI

    "Men fight for liberty & win it with hard knocks. Their children brought up easy, let it slip away again, poor fools. And their grandchildren are once more slaves" - D.H. Lawrence

    #167466 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    So very true, tragically so, Joss. And do our “free and fair” media do anything about it? Well, suffice to say, a resounding NO. Not without note that, if you dig into the backgounds of, say, the Flail’s medical writers, they turn out to be rabid privatisation advocates.

     

    #167489 Reply
    ajn

    The man responsible in the video seemed quite smug walking from the court..

    #168187 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Now, you think that waiting for you car order to be delivered is a long thing? Well, try getting an MRI booked on the NHS. Have just received a date for Mrs T’s MRI which is needed as a follow-up to her nasty operations. It has taken eight months to get the booking. Based on previous experience, will have to wait some four months after the scan to get some proper Consultant god to read it, then another month or so to hear his/her interpretation. Ho hum

    #168582 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Seems like VW are taking the revolution in propulsion way beyond electric vehicles, at least as seen in this recent entry on the VW T-Roc configuration page:

    Now, it might just be that they have decided to use that new Invisible Rubber stuff for the tyres. But I reckon they’ve gone down the full anti-gravity route.

    #168584 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Now, you think that waiting for you car order to be delivered is a long thing? Well, try getting an MRI booked on the NHS. Have just received a date for Mrs T’s MRI which is needed as a follow-up to her nasty operations. It has taken eight months to get the booking. Based on previous experience, will have to wait some four months after the scan to get some proper Consultant god to read it, then another month or so to hear his/her interpretation. Ho hum

    I have been referred for a CT scan, been told 1-2 weeks.

    #168590 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Well lucky, fwippers. Mrs T had to have one of those earlier in year. Eight week wait. Maybe the demand in our area, having many retired folks in residence, is just particularly high?

    #168650 Reply
    ajn

    #168827 Reply
    Georgie

    There’s something deeply pleasing about seeing a Craftman/woman/Craftsperson? creating something from scratch that is beautiful as well as functional.  Though I did think he was going to make a walking stick, so the initial laying down of that tree trunk was a bit unexpected!

    By coincidence, I watched this video about making marbles a couple of days ago and thought it was interesting, though I found the commentary a bit patronising – subtitles are available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cXy7gxUtbU

    I have been wondering, on and off, for a while why the big marbles are called ‘Allies’, so I looked it up.  According to St. Fagan’s National Museum of History “The ancient Greeks and Romans enjoyed playing marbles. Early games used balls made of stone such as marble, hence the name. Glass marbles were called steelies. Clay marbles were called commoneys. Brown marbles were called stonies and alabaster marbles were called allies.”  Still don’t know why cats-eye marbles were called ‘Ollies’.  Come to think of it, I don’t think I saw any other kind of marbles but cats-eye (ollies and allies) until I was an adult.

     

     

    #168848 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    QI facts and stuff which as quite bonkers, mad as cabbages and wonderfully obscure. I am SOOOOO pleased you’re back, Georgie. 😊

    #168901 Reply
    Georgie

    <bashful>  Gosh.  Thanks, Tharg.

    “quite bonkers, mad as cabbages and wonderfully obscure”   I should put that on a T-shirt.

    #168905 Reply
    Georgie

    Here’s something fascinating and impressive to watch while eating your breakfast.

    10 Levels of Sleight-of-hand card shuffles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7A2XdwWP04E

     

    #168973 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Card man absolutely stunning video. Always lost in admiration at such sleight of hand. Many moons ago, we were at some conference or sales gig (forget what) and Paul Daniels was a guest. We stood two to three feet in front of him, just us and him, no-one else. He did gags like the vid’, plus the steel rings and others. Although I know how some of them were done, just could not see the tricks, just the “impossible” magic.

    Looking forward to coming Monday (15 Nov) as am collecting new T-Roc from dealer. Sad to say goodbye to Mini, but backbone and teeth are very grateful. Snaps and first impressions when I can! {{{🚗}}}  Emoji is even the correct Tarty Red

    #169036 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    @Rene Some more stuff on disabled vehicles. I’ve put it here to avoid cluttering up the “Number on scheme” thread.

    This neat little fellow is the SMZ S3A car for the disabled produced in the USSR between 1958 and 1970. Given free to drivers it had a 346cc two-stroke single giving a max speed of 25mph. Many thousands were made. The USSR seems to have been very active in providing such vehicles. Much more modern ones exist but look extremely boring compared to this one. Stick a decent engine in it and it would become a cult “must-have”.

    The Czechs also were active in the  field. This one, a Velorex from 1945, had bodywork made from leather-cloth (post-war material shortages) and a Jawa 250cc two-stroke 8bhp single. Top speed? Very little. If wanted to spruce it up, I presume boot polish had to be applied and buffed up!

    Asking price today can be over £20K! ‘🙄

     

     

    #169041 Reply
    Rene

    They’re both cute, but the czech variant would be a horror to maintain (leather care), also looks a bit too much like a 2CV. Not going to lie, compared to the Invacar, the soviet variant is much easier on the eye. I could imagine that with a beetle boxer (to keep it somewhat period correct at least).

    You’re right, the newer ones look a bit.. soviet, apart from the latest one who does seem to be “slightly” (very) inspired by a 90s Cinquecento.

    #169104 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Yup. The Czech one would be a nightmare to polish up. Get through gallons of shoe wax polish and wear out many, many brushes. Would LOVE to see one in a patent leather though. 😲

    Interesting fact, discovered while looking into subject of cars for disabled, the USA seems to have made none. Except one or two 20s things which were like push-bike trikes with a single-pot ICE glued on. Most of the US efforts seem to have been adapting existing cars for the purpose. Guess they were, relatively, so cheap in the States that it wasn’t worth gearing up for a specialist model?

    #169134 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Well, the day is finally here. Picked up new car:

    VW T-Roc 2.0L SEL 4×4 with adjustable suspension and back support as extras. First impressions:

    Bad: Annoying having to fiddle around turning off a lot of digital dross before driving off.

    Good: Rides like a magic carpet compared to Mini, nearly as comfy as earlier Superbs; handles well too, not quite as point-and-go as Mini but sticks like glue; 4×4 well worth it, feels like an old-fashioned limited-slip diff, delivers comforting push in the back when needed; 2.0L lump also worth it, performance only a couple of tenths off the Mini.

     

    #169146 Reply
    joss
    Moderator

    @Tharg  Very nice looking car you have. I always liked the look of them. More pic’s please, especially interior.

    Enjoy the T-roc Tharg

    Joss
    Current car BMW X2 2.0i Sport sDrive Auto 2019 with Sport pack
    Last car Ford Focus Titanium 1.5 TDCI

    "Men fight for liberty & win it with hard knocks. Their children brought up easy, let it slip away again, poor fools. And their grandchildren are once more slaves" - D.H. Lawrence

    #169151 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    More snaps as soon as I can, Joss. The interior is, well, interesting. Seats have got garish stripes and look flat and uncomfortable. As soon as you get your bum in one, however, they are very comfy indeed. More later…

    #169187 Reply
    Georgie

    I want to adopt that Velorex, name it ‘Henry’ and keep it snug and warm in a stable.  Probably the safest place for it because it looks like a death-trap to drive. 🙂

    Great news with the T-Roc, Tharg!  Another ‘scarlet woman’ on the drive.  Is it a ‘large’ SUV?  (I tried checking on the Motab. site but it’s no longer available, apparently.)  Impressed that the performance isn’t far off the Mini’s because it looks a lot heavier.  The 2 ltr engine helps, I guess.

    “Bad: Annoying having to fiddle around turning off a lot of digital dross before driving off.”  Reminds me of my test drive in the Puma: Blokes showing me all the fancy features and I’m saying ‘Don’t use that.  Don’t use that.  Nope – never used that . . . ”

    Have fun and take care.  I’ve arranged some nice weather for you tomorrow!

     

    #169230 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    The T-Roc is small-ish. Considerably smaller than the Tiguan/Ateca etc, slightly longer than a SEAT Arona.

    Reasonable size, imho.

    And the “turning off stuff before driving off” annoyed us in the new Golf too, lane assist is “on” after every start of the engine. Thankfully, easy to turn off with a swift motion (not sure if that’s the case on the T-Roc too – in the Golf there’s a button on the end of the indicator stalk, if you press that it gets you into the assist menu, immediately press “ok” on the steering wheel, the lane assist is disabled), but still annoying.

    Current: SEAT Ateca Xcellence Lux 1.5 TSI DSG MY19
    On Order: VW Golf GTE PHEV DSG MY22

    #169253 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Dead right about size, Rene. Perfectly acceptable size: few millimetres wider and similar amount shorter than a Golf. Overall “footprint” is about 2% larger than the hatch. T-ROC is built on same platform. Feels just like a Golf to drive. Despite looking like a Golf with a posh frock and high heels, you are only 2cmm higher off road. Difficult getting accurate figures but the VW seems to weight about 200kg more than the Mini. Engine producing about the same bhp but the makers’ figures for 0-60 is only 0.4 secs slower – or identical if you takes Autocar’s independent measurement.

    Thanks for the tip about button on stalk, Rene. Will go in search of it. Driver’s manual is pretty useless. Have to use touch screen at the moment which I will not use while under way.

    Snaps as requested by Joss, to follow. 📷

     

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