‘If you don’t believe in the electric car yet, you soon will’

This topic contains 287 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  Brydo 4 months, 3 weeks ago.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #60038 Reply

    Brydo

    Electric cars are the future of motoring, and they’ll soon be impossible for consumers to ignore, says Steve Fowler…


    This is when the electric car starts to get really serious. This week Mercedes has revealed its first, bespoke, all-electric car to the world and later this month, Audi does the same. Rest assured, it’s not stopping there.

    It all comes hot on the heels of Jaguar getting its I-Pace to customers before its rivals – and winning our Car of the Year prize in the process – and Hyundai launching an affordable all-electric small SUV with a real-world range of 300 miles.

    Of course, cars like the Nissan Leaf, Renault Zoe and Tesla Models S and X have been with us for a while, but it’s going to take more mainstream and premium brands to come to the party to make wary buyers really sit up and take notice.

    The biggest barrier to EV ownership remains range – unfairly so, these days. The perception of ‘under 100 miles’ will soon change as closer to 300 miles becomes the new norm, while interest will increase as more and more appealing (if not particular attractive) cars like the EQC are launched.

    Mercedes is going at it with real gusto – EQ is set to become a Mercedes brand in the same way AMG and Maybach are. EQ stands for ‘electric intelligence’ (yes, that’s what I thought, too). It also stands for a range of electrified models that’ll line up against rivals from every other maker in the coming years.

    In spite of all that, every time I sing the praises of electric cars, my inbox chimes with messages from people who say they’ll never provide the fun we get from internal combustion-engined cars!

    To those people I say simply: go and try one. We had a similar situation 20 years ago with diesel. Once we’d experienced it – and seen the benefits – we were hooked. That’s the same with an EV; it’s hard not to be impressed and excited once you’ve had a go.

Viewing 25 replies - 251 through 275 (of 287 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #68342 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    The title ‘If you don’t believe in the electric car yet’ maybe someone should have word with motility the scheme is very unsupportive, regarding an EV unless you want a Smart car (not very wheelchair/mobility scooter friendly) . The cheapest  PHEV is the basic Mini PHEV, and the Zoë starting at £3900 to £4799 completely out of reach of the majority of mobility customers.

     


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #68353 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Just to balance the discussion

    https://www.autoevolution.com/news/six-problems-with-electric-cars-that-nobody-talks-about-112221.html


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #68402 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    Electric-car demand set to surge in 2019
    The latest sales figures suggest demand for electric cars will rise sharply this year, with lead times set to increase, too

    Sales of new electric cars are set to rapidly expand in 2019, after the sector grew by 10% last year – in stark contrast to the overall UK car market, which saw a 7% fall.

    One in every hundred cars sold in November had a pure electric drivetrain, and experts are urging consumers to place orders on electric vehicles as soon as possible to avoid lengthening lead times as demand grows.

    Research conducted by DrivingElectric shows delivery times for electric cars can stretch from 10 weeks – comparable with most internal-combustion-engined cars – to six months for the Jaguar I-Pace.

    The Kia Soul EV – which is set to be replaced by a new model later this year – is already in low supply, with the manufacturer saying there are none in ‘free stock’ and only a handful left in showrooms.

    Meanwhile, the waiting time for the Hyundai Kona Electric has been as much as 10 months, such is its popularity around the world.

    However, not all models are experiencing bottlenecks quite that extreme: 18 weeks separate order and delivery of the latest Volkswagen e-Golf, while Audi is promising a turnaround time of 10 to 12 weeks for the forthcoming e-tron SUV. The Renault ZOE also takes 12 weeks to reach customers.

    Plug-in hybrid cars could also suffer from ballooning lead times as 2019 unfolds: the Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In currently has a four-month delivery period, in contrast to the Hybrid variant, which is said to have “no lead time” between order and delivery.

    Analysis by Vicky Parrott, Associate Editor, DrivingElectric
    The last 12 months have been remarkable for electric cars, with the segment performing much more strongly than the overall market in 2018.

    During 2018, total new-car registrations were nearly 7% down by November compared to the same period in 2017. But pure-electric cars were up by over 10%. And in November itself, compared to the same month in 2017, the overall market was 3% smaller, while battery electric vehicles were nearly 70% ahead on the same month last year.

    Plug-in hybrid electric car sales also rose in 2018, by 26.7%, helped by a combination of interest in electric cars and the reassurance of having a conventional engine to boost range.

    With every sign that electric cars are immune to the doldrums much of the rest of the market found itself in during 2018, we expect demand to rise even faster in 2019.

    Because electric cars are seeing a global surge in interest, anyone who has pondered the idea of buying one is advised to stop dithering from this point and get ahead of any future supply bottlenecks caused by their popularity. It’s time to stop pondering and pounce.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68416 Reply

    CT

    Put Electric Motors into a Van Sized vehicle then I’ll consider it otherwise its just inaccessible

    #68420 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    CT have a watch of this, there is an EV van about half way through the video.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68456 Reply

    MikeFromLFEW
    Participant

    Granted that the range of electric cars is growing, but if you are even a slightly demanding prospective owner it’s ‘tough luck’.

    Our own experience is that we’d very much like an e-car or even a plug-in hybrid, but I want to be able to transport a bicycle on a tow-hitch. Can you have a tow hitch on an electric car? No. (and no, I’m not going to sling one on a contraption that’s going to burst the rear window, or drop off on the motorway, and no, I can’t physically lift any of my bikes onto the roof – even if you can find a e-car with a roof loading to carry that sort of weight)

    I strongly suspect that if you wanted even fairly simply modifications (on a Motability scheme car) the providers wouldn’t be able to oblige.
    As regards an e-car with major modifications – no, just no.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by  MikeFromLFEW.
    #68459 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    Mike i know nothing about tow hitches on a standard car never mind an EV but i do know that virtually ALL cars will be electric in the next decade so i am positive that all needs will be accomodated very soon.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68460 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV can tow a 1500kg caravan the Lexus I believe can tow 2000kg.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #68461 Reply

    Garys

    Correct oscarmax a  lot of phev users ( with the outlander phev) do tow 1500kg caravans and trailers

    Its also good in snow

    #68464 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    A look ahead at EV charging in 2019

    As the UK’s EV market goes from strength to strength, so to does its supporting infrastructure. 2018 proved a crucial year for EV charging, and 2019 is set to continue on the good work carried out during the previous 12 months.

    So what can we expect to see as EV drivers – or potential EV drivers – in terms of charging, both at home and on the road? Zap-Map walks you through a few key elements to the EV charging industry that you can expect in 2019.

    Faster charging

    Ultra-rapid public charge points are a-coming. Yes, there are a few already in the UK, but we are talking about a handful of units able to charge at more than 50 kW – for those non-Tesla drivers that is, who don’t have access to the Supercharger network.

    The good news is that 100 kW units are already being installed, and there are plans for 150 kW ultra-rapids on their way, effectively becoming the new ‘standard’ rapid charge point. Not only does this offer access to charging speeds three times that currently available UK-wide, but there is also the promise that pan-Europe network Ionity is arriving in the UK in 2019, bringing with it its 350 kW CCS chargers.

    Future-proofing the network for the foreseeable future, a 350 kW charge point will be able to top up an EV with a 100 kW battery in just 10 minutes, should the car be able to accept this level of power. Most don’t (yet), but the Porsche Taycan is due in 2019 and will have 350 kW charging capability.

    In the shorter-term, the 150 kW units mean that drivers of the newest generation of EVs can make maximum use of public rapid charging. The likes of the Hyundai Kona Electric, Jaguar I-Pace, and forthcoming Audi e-tron, Mercedes Benz EQC and Kia e-Niro can all charge at between 100 kW and 150 kW, depending on the model. Having charge points that can provide this level of charge is an important step in reducing the charging times for these models fitted with larger batteries.

    A look ahead at EV charging in 2019

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68465 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    New Nissan connected car technology will help drivers ‘see the invisible’

    Nissan will next week unveil its ‘Invisible-to-Visible’ (I2V) vision for connected cars which will help drivers see obstacles otherwise hidden out of sight.

    Created through Nissan Intelligent Mobility, the company’s vision for changing how cars are powered, driven and integrated into society, I2V will merge information from sensors outside and inside the vehicle with data from the cloud.

    This enables the system not only to track the vehicle’s immediate surroundings but also to anticipate what’s ahead – even showing what’s behind a building or around the corner.

    During manual driving, I2V provides information from Omni-Sensing as an overlay in the driver’s full field of view.

    I2V will make its debut at the CES trade show, and Tetsure Ueda, an expert leader at the Nissan Research Centre, said: “By helping you see the invisible, I2V enhances your confidence and makes driving more enjoyable.

    “The interactive features create an experience that’s tailored to your interests and driving style so that anyone can enjoy using it in their own way.”

    I2V is powered by Nissan’s Omni-Sensing technology, which acts as a hub gathering real-time data from the traffic environment and from the vehicle’s surroundings and interior

    Nissan’s SAM (Seamless Autonomous Mobility) technology analyses the road environment through real-time information, and the ProPilot semi-autonomous driver support system provides information about the car’s surroundings.

    The technology maps a 360-degree virtual space around the car to provide information about road and intersection status, visibility, signage or nearby pedestrians.

    I2V can also connect drivers and passengers to people in the Metaverse virtual world. This makes it possible for family, friends or others to appear inside the car as three-dimensional, augmented-reality avatars to provide company or assistance.

    The driver can also book a professional driver from the Metaverse to get personal instruction in real time.

    The professional driver appears as a projected avatar or as a virtual chase car in the driver’s field of vision to demonstrate the best way to drive.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68469 Reply

    Garys

    Soon the cars will not run as they realise everyone will have an accident at some point so lets not go anywhere

    #68470 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    Gary’s driving, or sitting getting driven, will be soooo much safer. Of course there will be accidents especially when there are new cars, with all this tech, and older cars without on the road at the same time, but eventually, accidents will be few and far between.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68472 Reply

    vinalspin
    Participant

    Accidents will be fewer and far between until the day the system has a complete failure and there are loads of accidents all at once, after all it will still rely on thousands of components, all of which will have been made to a high standard but no where near those made for the space shuttle and a few of those have failed spectacularly with devastating consequences because of a small part’s failure.

    #68507 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    You may be right vinalspin and with the ability to hack virtually any type of tech, there may be an opportunity for terrorist’s to cause mayhem.

     

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68512 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    Self-driving vehicles could reach critical mass sooner than expected

    A future where it’s cheaper to use a self-driving vehicle ― whether for transporting goods or people ― is driving a mobility revolution. And that future may be here sooner than many realize.

    Transportation is in transition. City populations are rapidly growing, and residents are using rideshare and public transit more often. According to the new eBook, Autonomous Vehicles and Our New Mobility, the increase in Transportation as a Service (TaaS) is driving a future where individual vehicle ownership may no longer be as convenient, or cost-effective, as shared ridership.

    The shifting mobility also impacts the movement of goods. Driver shortages, safety and efficiency are issues facing companies that haul cargo on roadways, whether long distance in heavy-duty semi-trucks or last-mile deliveries in medium-duty trucks and vans.

    The rise of autonomous vehicles could mean billions in safety, collision repair and operations savings, not to mention reductions in greenhouse gas emissions with AVs primarily built on the electric vehicle (EV) platform.

    Experts predict the AV tipping point, when AVs are more efficient than owning and operating vehicles, could happen within the next three to five years.

    Black & Veatch’s new eBook was developed to help all stakeholders understand and plan for AVs. The free download provides an analysis of market and societal factors accelerating AV adoption and the infrastructure requirements needed to enable this transportation evolution.

    As with all emerging technologies, partnerships will propel autonomous vehicles, and through timely collaboration, the industry will be able to plan and establish supportive charging, electric utility, and communication networks. Combined with a regulatory framework that encourages innovation, these essential digital infrastructure networks will enable the most significant transportation evolution to hit the roads in several decades.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68519 Reply

    vinalspin
    Participant

    I’m still struggling to see how autonomous or shared vehicle ownership would work for average joe disabled, I need to pop my powerchair in the back with ramps and nip into town to pick up my new specs, then over to the supermarket to grab a few essentials, then my phone goes and I go meet my mate for a cappo down at the retail park, how would any of that happen with any kind of autonomous/shared vehicle system?

    #68522 Reply

    Craig

    Driverless cars – no thanks

    #68529 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    My understanding computers control air traffic control and responsible for landing planes, they control you engine management systems in milliseconds, including that computer you have replied on the forum, I cannot understand all the scepticism.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #68530 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    Vinalspin, all you would do is book the car for as long as you would need it, if that was six hours then that’s what you would get.

    I see motability having a two tier system in the future, at least initially, a future where some would choose to share and some would not. If you are blind, can’t drive or do very few miles each year then sharing an autonomous vehicle would be ideal. There are autonomous vehicles coming to the market where you won’t even need to struggle in an out of your wheelchair, the entire back end of the car opens up allowing you to get into the car in your wheelchair.

    Craig you will have no optain, unless something unforeseen happens, they will be on the streets within a few years.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68531 Reply

    Brydo
    Participant

    Oscarmax I think it is partially a fear of the unknown and partially an age thing. I read a few other forum and I think, maybe because of the age demographic, that this forum is the least receptive to EVs in general and that may be because, in general, the majority of posters on here are middle age and up, myself included lol.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe

    #68533 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Brydo fortunately I am one of the few people who openly admit my driving is not as good as it used to be when I was younger, as regard fear of accident human drivers are doing and excellent job aren’t they , hands up first person who has never had an accident or made a mistakes driving.

    A small minority of us are excellent driver, the majority are average, and quite a few are just appalling. No I have no problems with autonomous cars.

     


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #68545 Reply

    vinalspin
    Participant

    All valid points, I build and repair PC’s, Laptops etc and they do go wrong quite often, that aside, booking a vehicle for a certain amount of time is all good except if  like now I fancy a coffee it will take me 2 minutes to go out to my car and off I go, how would i book that in?

    #68552 Reply

    Craig

    Think your being a tad optimistic about driverless cars Brydo. Maybe in 20 years or so they will be more commonplace, not in next 5 years they won’t.

    #68553 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    if I fancy a coffee I keep a kettle in my kitchen.


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

Viewing 25 replies - 251 through 275 (of 287 total)
Reply To: ‘If you don’t believe in the electric car yet, you soon will’

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Your information: