Home wallbox charger for full EVs, do we have to pay?

This topic contains 56 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  GizmoMac 2 weeks, 6 days ago.

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    Topic
  • #115014 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Currently trying to get info on whether motability customers get a free wallbox or if we have to pay, the Peugeot motability person at the dealers doen’t seem to have a clue, or is being economic with the truth.

     

    Any idea?

Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 56 total)
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  • #115154 Reply

    Markymate

    I make you right on the brown envelopes. Trouble is all the houses on the posh side of town seem to have them!!

    Maybe I’ll try my local councillor, you never know??

    #115159 Reply

    roly
    Participant

    Last three posts prove to me that EV tech not yet advanced enough for the driver of average means

    You have to keep in mind that running electrical accessories in a petrol/diesel engine vehicle is also affecting the economy. The only exception is the heater, which is dissipating some of the heat* from the engine’s cooling system.

    *and remember that the engine heat is just more wasted energy.

    #115244 Reply

    Ian

    Just clicked over 10000 miles in my I3s. Its been glorious……cheap electricity tariff plus solar panels mean my 5k annual diesel bill has plummeted by 90%.

    Electric vehicles might not work for everyone but wow its working for me…

    #115254 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Last three posts prove to me that EV tech not yet advanced enough for the driver of average means

    You have to keep in mind that running electrical accessories in a petrol/diesel engine vehicle is also affecting the economy. The only exception is the heater, which is dissipating some of the heat* from the engine’s cooling system. *and remember that the engine heat is just more wasted energy.

    Roly have you got you car yet?


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #115255 Reply

    Footloose

    Hi Ian

    i hope your well..can I ask if there are any favourite features on the i3s other than the economical savings that you enjoy?👍

    #115257 Reply

    Brydo

    Good to see you back Ian, I’ve missed your first hand experience posts.

    #115258 Reply

    Peter

    @Ian said:

    “Electric vehicles might not work for everyone but wow its working for me…”

    I couldn’t agree more!  I wish I’d moved to electric years ago.  I love the completely different driving dynamics, the quiet and the shed loads of cash I’m saving on fuel.

    #115259 Reply

    Ian

    All good here Footloose…..

    Favourite features…..

    1. Performance the car is electrifying upto 40mph
    2. Build quality typical BMW
    3. Audio system is really good in fact I really like the interaction between driver and screens (love that spotify is in the car along with the news and weather)
    4. Quirky looks
    5. Space inside for driving.
    6. Plugging into charge at home  soooo much nicer than having to spend £80 at a petrol station.

    Don’t like rear doors in car parks…

    Hope this helps….

     

     

     

    #115285 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I have contacted Motability about the Home Wallbox Charger and have been told that from April 2020 the process has changed and that for those of us who are ordering a full EV, a Home Wallbox Charger will be provided by Chargemaster (if it’s the first Home Wall Charger).

    The process that triggers the process of getting the Charger is when the dealer keys in the order the system detects that the car is full EV and you are asked if you agree to info being given to Chargemaster for the provision of the Charger.

    Then Chargemaster will contact you to get the process rolling.

    #115289 Reply

    Ian

    The charger is supplied by BMW fitted by charge master. Its a fine looking unit but a bit basic for my needs….I was hoping it could be a bit more choosy around the electricity tariff ie charge when cheap or solar generated stop charging when it gets expensive….. that said its very easy to setup for overnight cheap charging on Octopus energy. Referral code here if anyone wants cheap electricity……

    https://share.octopus.energy/warm-snow-738

    If you move to Octopus energy we share £100. Today I’m paying the below

     

    16th June 2020
    Period
    Price (inc. VAT)
    00:00 – 00:30
    6.17 p/kWh
    00:30 – 01:00
    5.13 p/kWh
    01:00 – 01:30
    5.51 p/kWh
    01:30 – 02:00
    5.38 p/kWh
    02:00 – 02:30
    5.49 p/kWh
    02:30 – 03:00
    5.05 p/kWh
    03:00 – 03:30
    5.16 p/kWh
    03:30 – 04:00
    5.07 p/kWh
    04:00 – 04:30
    5.11 p/kWh
    04:30 – 05:00
    5.09 p/kWh
    05:00 – 05:30
    5.73 p/kWh
    05:30 – 06:00
    5.73 p/kWh
    06:00 – 06:30
    6.39 p/kWh
    06:30 – 07:00
    5.95 p/kWh
    07:00 – 07:30
    5.73 p/kWh
    07:30 – 08:00
    7.72 p/kWh
    08:00 – 08:30
    7.28 p/kWh
    08:30 – 09:00
    7.94 p/kWh
    09:00 – 09:30
    8.16 p/kWh
    09:30 – 10:00
    7.68 p/kWh
    10:00 – 10:30
    8.36 p/kWh
    10:30 – 11:00
    7.85 p/kWh
    11:00 – 11:30
    7.50 p/kWh
    11:30 – 12:00
    7.50 p/kWh
    12:00 – 12:30
    7.83 p/kWh
    12:30 – 13:00
    7.23 p/kWh
    13:00 – 13:30
    7.06 p/kWh
    13:30 – 14:00
    5.73 p/kWh
    14:00 – 14:30
    6.09 p/kWh
    14:30 – 15:00
    5.73 p/kWh
    15:00 – 15:30
    5.73 p/kWh
    15:30 – 16:00
    6.44 p/kWh
    16:00 – 16:30
    18.33 p/kWh
    16:30 – 17:00
    20.76 p/kWh
    17:00 – 17:30
    19.92 p/kWh
    17:30 – 18:00
    21.20 p/kWh
    18:00 – 18:30
    21.84 p/kWh
    18:30 – 19:00
    21.84 p/kWh
    19:00 – 19:30
    8.56 p/kWh
    19:30 – 20:00
    7.68 p/kWh
    20:00 – 20:30
    8.02 p/kWh
    20:30 – 21:00
    6.62 p/kWh
    21:00 – 21:30
    7.14 p/kWh
    21:30 – 22:00
    6.42 p/kWh
    22:00 – 22:30
    7.14 p/kWh
    22:30 – 23:00
    6.28 p/kWh

    #115292 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Hi Ian

    I like the 13:30 to 15:30 slot for the quick top-up (whilst the washing machine, dishwasher, jetwash, hedge trimmer & everything else is going on too).

    My electricity & gas contract ends in November so I’ll have to calculate if it’s worth paying the exit fee on the electricity before then, I already have a smart meter on 1/2 hourly (not that it always manages to communicate with the supplier).

    Thanks for the referal code

     

     

    #115299 Reply

    Ian

    Hi this particular tariff changes depending on supply and demand….high renewables and low demand mean its cheap as chips at the moment. Other tariffs are available.

    Its saving me a fortune, I thought my direct debit would increase because of electrical vehicle charging but such are the savings my direct debit remains the same despite increased consumption through car charging

    #115316 Reply

    Bandit
    Participant

    Do certain EVs require a minimum kWh homecharge box? Ie, some 7kw and others 22? If so then am I right in thinking that when going for your first EV through Motability then it might be worth pushing the boat out a bit more than you usually might (assuming you can afford to somehow) on a model that requires ( or comes with) a 22kw, so that you then have the better one going forward ( assuming you’re likely to be having further EVs on, or even off, the scheme)?

    #115320 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Do certain EVs require a minimum kWh homecharge box? Ie, some 7kw and others 22? If so then am I right in thinking that when going for your first EV through Motability then it might be worth pushing the boat out a bit more than you usually might (assuming you can afford to somehow) on a model that requires ( or comes with) a 22kw, so that you then have the better one going forward ( assuming you’re likely to be having further EVs on, or even off, the scheme)?

    Currently, only some larger houses have a 3 phase electricity supply that would be needed for a 22kW charger

    Most homes will have a single phase of a supply shared between houses, so you neighbour will probably have a different phase to you.

    Single phase will get you either a 3.7 (16 Amp) or 7.4kW (32 Amp) option, you want the 32 Amp if possible.

    If you only have a main fuse that’s small (60Amp or less), or your cabling is ancient, then you may be restricted to the 16 Amp.

    The “granny charger” cables you see that plug into a normal wall socket in your house are supposed to be rated 10 Amp max here in the UK, the idea being that if you charge on a 16 Amp house circuit there’s still some overhead, and pulling 10 Amp for an extended number of hours will hopefully not overheat the cables as fast as pulling the usual 13 Amps would. Granny chargers can be obtained that can be set to anything from 6 Amp to 16 Amp, although you’ll get a euro type plug on those & they’re not recommended (you don’t want a fire starting in the middle of the night as your cables melt inside the walls).

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  gothitjulie.
    #115323 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Do certain EVs require a minimum kWh homecharge box? Ie, some 7kw and others 22? If so then am I right in thinking that when going for your first EV through Motability then it might be worth pushing the boat out a bit more than you usually might (assuming you can afford to somehow) on a model that requires ( or comes with) a 22kw, so that you then have the better one going forward ( assuming you’re likely to be having further EVs on, or even off, the scheme)?

    For a 22 kW EV you will require a 415v  3 phase supply, you average domestic supply is only a single phase spur of the 3 phase supply. You would need to contact and pay your local energy company for a new 3 phase supply


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #117895 Reply

    BionicRusty (Wayne)
    Participant

    This will depend on where you charge the car & on which car you choose as some cars are more efficient than others, but I’l have a go: For 1 year on my current 15p per kW/h tariff for electricity at home, 100% home charging for a Peugeot e2008 WLTP 230Wh/mi (watt hours per mile) – £348 For 1 year using a specific EV tariff at 5p per kW/h, 100% home charging – £116 For 1 year using instavolt rapid DC chargers at 35p per kW/h only – £812 This will give you an idea of costs using EVs, if you do 8000 miles with the petrol 2008 at £1 a litre doing 49 mpg (WLTP) £741, and at £1.30 a litre £963.

     

    Julie, thank you so much for posting this. Trying to find info such as this is nigh on impossible. I know the calcs can be done easily enough but I’m new to thinking about electric.
    I’m really wanting to make the change as early as possible for a number of reasons but at the moment, for me, I’m not sure it’s right. Rural area, old house with old wiring and practically zero public chargers within 60 miles.  My yearly mileage isn’t huge anymore but trips can be over 200 per day.
    The cheap cost of charging right now is a massive plus and the costs you present show this but this can’t last and at some point, fuel stations as we know them will change as we see the demise of the oil giants and automotive fuel costs will become governed by the electricity sector. I can see petrol stations all but disappear with EV electric ‘fuel stations’ extending to home charging where we will purchase EV electric from home, via an app with a choice of suppliers such as we do with other services. Once this happens, and it has to somehow in order to plug the taxation hole, then EV electric will increase.

    Added to this, the current free home charger plus fitting adds to tell me I need to be as early as possible to the party but feel it’s governed by my location.

     

    🏎 I will be remembered for nothing but had great fun doing it 🏎

    #117906 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I’m really wanting to make the change as early as possible for a number of reasons but at the moment, for me, I’m not sure it’s right. Rural area, old house with old wiring and practically zero public chargers within 60 miles. .

    I’m not sure the old electrics are the problem as they will require a new feed from the electricity meter area to the wallbox charger, something that would be part of the free installation anyway.

    The real problem is the practically zero public chargers within 60 miles, so you always need 60 miles in hand when returning home, and for a return journey out beyond that you need to start with at least 120 miles of range. For that you’ll be waiting for the elusive Kia Soul/Niro, Hyundai Kona, and these models have always been about waiting times with the Kia Soul said to currently be 12 weeks but would soon be over a year if it appeared anytime soon on the Scheme.

    For myself, the nearest Rapid (CCS) is about 8 miles away in the next town, the nearest Fast (7kW) is 2.9 miles away. I consider the home charger essential, but could manage by bulk charging at a Rapid, top up charge at one of the supermarket free Fast, and to fill upto 100% on the morning of a long journey I could use a “granny” charger (10 amp 3 pin plug to type 2, although you can set them up at 16 amp with a dedicated Commando socket (16 amp is the 3.7kW you occasionally hear of)).

     

    I have further information on the Motability supplied wallbox after the BP Chargemaster chappie phoned me Friday afternoon. Two types available:

    tethered – supplied with standard 4.7 metres cable from wallbox to car type 1 or 2 depending on the car type (most are type 2 now).

    socket – use your own type 2 cable which will cost you a fair amount, I’ve ordered a blue coloured 32 amp 10 metre cable at £190 delivered.

    The type 2 cable that comes with a Peugeot e-2008 is reputed to be 6 metres which will be too short for my needs at home, but fine for charging from 7kW posts at a supermarket. I could take the 10 metre cable with me instead which may allow me to park in an adjacent disabled space & rob the electic supply from the EV charge space if it’s been ICE’d (ICE – Internal Combust Engine) by a fossil (EV speak for ICE cars and includes PHEVs which only charge at 3.7kW, thus blocking full EVs).

     

    #117960 Reply

    Ade

    As far as I can tell, the petrol station chargers cost about £11-14 to charge for 200 miles, which I thought was a bit pricey. This was watching a few youtube vids on EV cars.

    #117984 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Many EV drivers look at it a different way, with most journeys being covered by home charging at 5 – 15p per kW/h, then only on occasion use the public charge network of Fast & Rapid chargers which are pricey  (e.g. Shell recharge – 39p per kW/h, BP – 15p per kW/h for Polar Plus members else more, and Ionity running at 69p per kW/h (use a Maingau card if you use Ionity a lot at the moment to get it cheaper). As you’d only very occasionally be using the public charger network then you’d not mind paying some of these very expensive prices.

    If you only use public chargers then it’s going to be a lot more expensive in time & money than petrol or diesel currently.

    There’s another potential cost too depending on which chargers you use, that of parking fees. If you’re lucky you’ll find a “Blue Badge Holders exemption” from these costs, but you then need to be careful as some of these exemptions only apply to disabled spaces, & there’s perhaps 1 or 2 disabled spaces with chargers in the UK.

    EVs are not going to be an easy option for many of us & anyone thinking of going down the EV path at the present time needs to do a lot of research. In perhaps 5 years we’ll all wonder what all the range anxiety and public charger networks that were unreliable were all about….. or it’ll be just as bad as it is now with lazy local politicians who block EV charging post installations (just get Extinction Rebellion to blockade their driveway with a yacht or something, I guess, to change their minds).

    Hastings, you look at it on a map of chargers and it looks very good, you turn up to charge & find that the CYC chargers don’t work, and they won’t be repaired because Hastings Council is pleading poverty saying it can’t afford the bill to repair them. You can find many other places around the UK who have taken grant monies & had these chargers installed where they wanted & now these councils refuse to pay to maintain them. Problem is they’re really in the wrong places to be truly useful as you need destination (7kW) chargers at destinations, and rapid chargers en route, and seaside towns are destinations, look at Brighton and all the available destination chargers, and one rapid charger that is currently off limits due to the coronavirus. Trouble is it’s not that the council in Brighton are blessed with some strange foresight, it’s because many of the councilors are green warriors who drive EVs and know what chargers are needed.

     

    #117997 Reply

    Zero1
    Participant

    @gothitjulie If you don’t mind me asking, how long did it take for BP Chargemaster to contact you after Motability had accepted your new electric car order and what is the lead-time on installation?

    #118001 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Motability order acceptance to BP Chargemaster contact about 2 weeks.

    Installation pencilled in for 7th August (5 weeks from contact with BP Chargemaster).

     

    #118003 Reply

    Zero1
    Participant

    Many thanks, gothjulie. Was the installation date the earliest you could get?

    I’m having real issues with Motability and getting a a home charging point sorted. My car was ordered with the dealer in March, Motability accepted the order on the 8th June and I still haven’t had any contact from BP Chargemaster….. Car is now due to be delivered to the dealer this week!!

    I’ve lost count of the number of phone calls to Motability, BP Chargemaster & the Dealer i’ve made over the last 3 weeks!!

    #118007 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    The installation date was merely a pencilled in date some time in the future as I’m waiting for permissions on installing the box on the front of the bungalow, I have no idea if it’ll even happen yet.

    BP Chargemaster sent me requests for photos, measurements etc., so they can see what is needed for the installation, and they have also requested the information for the grant, so they’re asking for the registration document of the vehicle (the one that we don’t get as it’s kept by motability), so they’ve not sorted the process out properly yet. Some of these requests will be difficult with the coronavirus situation if you need someone to move furniture or take photos of the meter cupboard (I thought I’d ended the accessibility of the meter cupboard issue with the fitting of a SMETS2 smartmeter).

     

     

     

    #118008 Reply

    Zero1
    Participant

    Thank you for detailing your process so far….. Do you have your electric car now or is it on order?

    I’m stuck in a goto loop at step 1…. BP Chargemaster are still waiting for Motability to send them the home charging point request!!

    #118013 Reply

    BionicRusty (Wayne)
    Participant

    Thank you again  Julie, for all of you information. You’re definitely a mine of information.
    The charger situation has actually changed since I last looked. For my area three or four have popped up with service station like access. There are more but either office hours or less. Some may think this wouldn’t be an issue but my view, right now, is different. It’s just too risky for me right now. I certainly hope more pop up soon.

    🏎 I will be remembered for nothing but had great fun doing it 🏎

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