Home wallbox charger for full EVs, do we have to pay?

This topic contains 56 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  GizmoMac 3 weeks, 1 day ago.

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    Topic
  • #115014 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Currently trying to get info on whether motability customers get a free wallbox or if we have to pay, the Peugeot motability person at the dealers doen’t seem to have a clue, or is being economic with the truth.

     

    Any idea?

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 56 total)
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  • #115017 Reply

    mitch
    Participant

    when i was looking at the bmw i3 the wall box was free i assume its the same for all ev’s.

    there were several threads about it and i seem to think there was a quote from motability to that effect.

    at that time there werent many ev’s, now peugeot etc have come on i dont know for sure if it applys to them but i think someone had a ds and thier box was free.

    #115018 Reply

    mitch
    Participant

    from website

    Set-up costs
    There are a few costs related to EVs that are unique to this type of car. Getting a home charge point installed is one of the expected costs associated with these types of EVs.

    This can range between £400-£1500 depending on the type and speed of charging required. It is worth noting that Motability Scheme customers leasing their first fully electric vehicle get a home charge point installed free of charge. However, Scheme customers opting for a plug-in hybrid do have to cover the cost themselves. As well as a charge point, you may want to get a charging cable that can be used at public points that don’t have that option. These charging cables are a little more affordable, costing around a few hundred pounds.

    #115020 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Thanks mitch, I’d read that & was searching for it still…..

     

    Link:

    What’s the real cost of having an electric vehicle?

    #115025 Reply

    JS
    Moderator

    On that Note, as I’m in the process of redesigning the garden, and allowing for EV is something I want to allow for, I have a long back garden with no current electric points, I will be putting Electric to a shed/garage at some point,

    what is needed for these free wall boxes EV Chargers ? Is an out door socket enough or does it need a 32amp supply of its own etc,

     

    #115026 Reply

    roly
    Participant

    The wall box chargers (pod point et al) will require a dedicated 16A or 32A supply.

    #115029 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    A 32A supply will need a spare 40A fuse, so you may need a new & seperate fuse box too, plus the big fuse in your meter cupboard, have a look at the size, the 60A fuses are a bit small so you may need to ask the electric company about upgrading to a 100A (that may mean some new cables so could get pricey). if you’re lucky you’ll find you’ve got 3 phase, which means you could potentially get a 22kW charger (charge a Zoe 50 in 3 hours on that).

     

    If you are running cables underground you’ll either need armoured, or some protected pipes with a rope going through it to pull a cable when they come to install a wall charger.

     

    #115031 Reply

    JS
    Moderator

    at present i have 100A main fuse and space in the RCD board but thats 35mtrs away from where a charger would go but im sure i read somewhere the customer has to have suitable supply within 5mtrs, burying ducting and running cables wont be an issue as the whole garden is being altered, the annoying thing is the Electricity lamp post is only 10mtrs away,

    #115037 Reply

    Menorca Mike
    Participant

    From the box to the car is it just one cable ? Is it heavy to lift the cable ? I’m fine lifting a petrol pump

    BBC Breakfast expert, VW Golf driver.

    #115043 Reply

    mitch
    Participant

    its a glorified extension cable mike with bigger plugs.

    #115048 Reply

    Menorca Mike
    Participant

    Cheers Mitch

    BBC Breakfast expert, VW Golf driver.

    #115050 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Mike, there are two types of wallbox cable to car, tethered and non tethered.

    Tethered – The wall box has a cable coming directly from it to a type 2 plug at the other end that goes into the car’s charging socket.

    Non-tethered – Has a socket for a type 2 to type 2 cable (can be the same cable you carry around in the car for using the 7kW charging posts in car parks). Commonly a 5 metre cable, or in my case it’ll be a 10 metre cable as box to car is about 7 metres & you want the cable to lay along the ground as it’s fairly heavy and would stress the sockets at each end otherwise.

     

    JS – I think I read that 15 metres from supply (the fuse box) to the wall box was the maximum included, but you’d just pay for the extra lenth of cable per metre. There’s always the worry about guage of cable needed over longer lengths, but it’s alternating current at 240V all the way to the car so it’s not the worry you get with longer cable lengths on the DC rapid chargers where they often use liquid cooled cables (now you know why they are so expensive).

     

    #115051 Reply

    Smallcar
    Participant

    How long will it before electric cars will be able to be driven to a petrol station and pay for a very quick full charge? This is the only practical way forward for people living in flats or without drives and will save all this faffing around getting chargers fitted at home. Electric charging will have to dramatically increase in cost before long  and petrol station owners will want to cash in.

    #115070 Reply

    Menorca Mike
    Participant

    What I cannot understand surely on an electric car the radio heated seats etc are using power from the batteries so surely that reduces the range especially in winter with your heater on etc ! So say a range of 300 miles is 250 miles realistic ?

    BBC Breakfast expert, VW Golf driver.

    #115078 Reply

    Oscarmax
    Participant

    On that Note, as I’m in the process of redesigning the garden, and allowing for EV is something I want to allow for, I have a long back garden with no current electric points, I will be putting Electric to a shed/garage at some point, what is needed for these free wall boxes EV Chargers ? Is an out door socket enough or does it need a 32amp supply of its own etc,

    The first thing you will have to consider is you incoming supply older properties have a 60 amp supply later properties have a 80/100 amp supply, fortunately I had a 100 amp supply, if you only have a 60 amp supply you will need to contact your supplier for an upgrade.

    For a 32 amp (7kW) circuit you will need 4mm2 armour plated cable which can run under paved areas or 450mm below exposed ground levels, or 16 amp (3.6kW)circuit will need 2.5mm. For a 22KW system you will need a new 3 phase incoming supply (expensive)

    For very long runs you will there will be a voltage drop in that case use 6mm2 for 32 amp and 4mm2 for 16 amp.

    Plus obviously a fuse consumer unit, with a 32 amp circuit you will be able to take a 16 amp supply from the consumer unit for your EV charger.

    If you require a 32 amp EV charger I would use 10 mm2 armour cable.

     


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #115079 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    How long will it before electric cars will be able to be driven to a petrol station and pay for a very quick full charge? This is the only practical way forward for people living in flats or without drives and will save all this faffing around getting chargers fitted at home. Electric charging will have to dramatically increase in cost before long and petrol station owners will want to cash in.

     

    No very local chargers to me, none in the local garages, but 15 miles & I start to encounter 150kW chargers in the petrol stations, both Shell & BP. Nearest charger that I could use is about 3.5 miles away, 7kW and free.

     

    #115081 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    What I cannot understand surely on an electric car the radio heated seats etc are using power from the batteries so surely that reduces the range especially in winter with your heater on etc ! So say a range of 300 miles is 250 miles realistic ?

    Trick is to preheat your car in winter whilst tethered to the mains electric, other than that you’re right, range drops if you switch anything on. Some EVs have a heat pump which helps with more efficient heating but heat pumps become less efficient with lower temperatures (they work great for aircon in the summer & not bad for heating at 10C in winter, but at -10C they’re inefficient and will use a lot of power from your range).

    Range is also reduced in winter by the battery temperature, a cold lithium battery will hold 20% less energy so your range is hit again. You can see the difference in real world cold & mild conditions in https://ev-database.uk/car/1168/Peugeot-e-208 as an example.

     

    #115085 Reply

    Smallcar
    Participant

    Last three posts prove to me that EV tech not yet advanced enough for the driver of average means

    #115088 Reply

    ian

    we have an older house with a 60amp main fuse. called UK power who came and fitted a 80amp fuse ready for when I get an electric car, whenever that might be. I mentioned that I might need an 100amp, he said if you charge over night you should have no problem, the issue would be if you charged your car during the day, then switched on induction hob, kettle, dishwasher etc. 80 amp should be fine, most fuses have a tolerance built before blowing, 60 -80 amp, 80-100amp.

    #115089 Reply

    Matthew

    So does anyone know let’s say over a year how much the electric would be to run a electric say let’s say 8000 miles a year any ideas

    #115091 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    So does anyone know let’s say over a year how much the electric would be to run a electric say let’s say 8000 miles a year any ideas

    This will depend on where you charge the car & on which car you choose as some cars are more efficient than others, but I’l have a go:

    For 1 year on my current 15p per kW/h tariff for electricity at home, 100% home charging for a Peugeot e2008 WLTP 230Wh/mi (watt hours per mile) – £348

    For 1 year using a specific EV tariff at 5p per kW/h, 100% home charging – £116

    For 1 year using instavolt rapid DC chargers at 35p per kW/h only – £812

    This will give you an idea of costs using EVs, if you do 8000 miles with the petrol 2008 at £1 a litre doing 49 mpg (WLTP)  £741, and at £1.30 a litre £963.

     

     

    #115094 Reply

    Smallcar
    Participant

    Those costs of course are unsustainable in the longer term as the tax currently raised from fossil fuel cars will plummet and it will need to be replaced ( and more due to state of economy due to Covid)

    #115097 Reply

    Matthew

    Thanks a lot for that very interesting cheers

    #115102 Reply

    Markymate

    I was seriously looking into getting the Skoda Superb iV but after exhaustive research, it seems that being 15 metres from house to car is a no goer. Even asked the council about putting a power point but basically just laugh!!  Times are tough and money is tight so they told me.

    #115113 Reply

    JS
    Moderator

    after a bit of digging it seems Motability have teamed up with ChargeMaster and those that dont have a private drive are given access to the Polar  Network.  for any orders after !st June. so i guess it depends on chargemaster rules as to position.

    #115115 Reply

    gothitjulie
    Participant

    I was seriously looking into getting the Skoda Superb iV but after exhaustive research, it seems that being 15 metres from house to car is a no goer. Even asked the council about putting a power point but basically just laugh!! Times are tough and money is tight so they told me.

    The councils can take advantage of government grants to install these roadside charge points, in some areas there are many popping up, yet in others there are none as the councils haven’t asked for the grant money. Of course, who gets a charge point outside their house at the roadside will depend on politics & brown envelopes, so expect them all in areas that people have their own private driveways rather than where people have no choice but to park roadside.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 4 weeks ago by  gothitjulie.
Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 56 total)
Reply To: Home wallbox charger for full EVs, do we have to pay?

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