Have you heard a BEV owner say “i don’t like it”?

  • This topic has 70 replies, 13 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by Markw.
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #161011 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Still a fair bit of anti BEV retoric on the forum which is fine as its all about opinion however those that have shifted from an ICE car to a BEV would be the obvious opinion to listen to.

    So if you have recently changed over could you please give your honest opinion on how you have found the change?

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 70 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #161104 Reply
    ajn

    <p style=”text-align: left;”></p>

    #161105 Reply
    Sue

    Intracity – When you say a bit of planning, what do you mean?

    I’ve looked into what I could do to try to enable getting an EV (I would really like one to be honest) but it just doesn’t seem possible or practical as I cannot home charge. We have no charging points in the village, my work car park doesn’t even have parking bay lines let alone charging bays, the next nearest town has 3 charge points but at any given time, at least two are out of order and the next nearest charge points are at least 10 miles away in a place I don’t regularly travel to (once in the last 2 years) and after using all my energy just to keep working, can’t drive to anyway.

    It wouldn’t just take planning for me to own one, it would take a complete change of journeying and lifestyle and be oodles more inconvenient.

    #161107 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Intracity – When you say a bit of planning, what do you mean? I’ve looked into what I could do to try to enable getting an EV (I would really like one to be honest) but it just doesn’t seem possible or practical as I cannot home charge. We have no charging points in the village, my work car park doesn’t even have parking bay lines let alone charging bays, the next nearest town has 3 charge points but at any given time, at least two are out of order and the next nearest charge points are at least 10 miles away in a place I don’t regularly travel to (once in the last 2 years) and after using all my energy just to keep working, can’t drive to anyway. It wouldn’t just take planning for me to own one, it would take a complete change of journeying and lifestyle and be oodles more inconvenient.

    Hi Sue, the planning is mainly to do with range and where you’re going.

    How many miles do you travel each week on average?  Say for instance you have a 20 mile each way commute to work (200 miles a week), in a Kona/Soul, you’d need to pop into a fast charger for 40 minutes once a week.  I have no chargers in my village either, so pop into Swindon 15 miles away to do my shopping and charge the car.  The fuel savings for me at least far outweigh the slight adaptions to lifestyle.  There are also several pub/restaurants near me (within 15 miles) that have a fast charger, so can pop in for a drink or food rather than just sitting in the car.

    It’s difficult to advise when you don’t know where you are, how you live, and how much driving you do, all I can say is how I manage, and it, for me at least, in the end is only minor modifications to lifestyle, and I tend to try and adapt that into a journey, rather than going on a journey just to charge up.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #161110 Reply
    Sue

    I do around 100-130 miles a week with a commute of 4 miles each way (it can be multiple trips rather than one there and one back per day though as I have a weird work schedule to work around my issues), I have my shopping delivered and shopping centre shopping is a once in a blue moon event, rarely go to restaurants or pubs, especially right now and none of the ones I have been to have chargers either. I also can’t drive distances, do stuff and then drive back home again…I use the train for that.

    So it would be a complete lifestyle change and lots of inconvenience and extra expense as there is really no way to incorporate it into my day to day living due to the lack of infrastructure available .

    Mind you, it will probably reach this area eventually, the house price crash happened here later than everywhere else and we were still going down when everyone else was on the up (it did mean that we were still going up when everywhere else was going down though), London fashion would take two years to get here and there was much excitement when we finally got a Maccy D’s years after pretty much everywhere else had and Lidls is a new revelation to the locals. We’re all agog at the moment, Deliveroo went live here this week! Give us another 10-15 years and we might finally have the infrastructure that some places have now….

    #161113 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Deliveroo… wow, we haven’t got there yet, or Just Eat, but as you say it will get there soon.

    In the end, if it’s too far outside your comfort zone, then you have little choice, but with your mileage, you’d only need to charge twice a month, and there are some great advantages come winter in an EV, no more defrosting the car, which from what you’ve said, sounds like it would be a big advantage to you?

    Lidl, seems to be putting in lots of chargers, hopefully, if the infrastructure isn’t good enough now for you, it will be when you are ready for a future car change.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #161115 Reply
    brydo

    Sue what’s your living situation do you live in a flat? if so is it ground floor? Do you have street lighting? If so are there any nearby? What’s parking like in your street is it very busy or do you get parked no bother?

    Local councils get grants to fit road side chargers including lamppost chargers so there are options available.

    #161117 Reply
    Sue

    Deliveroo is a big woo….for when I am at my mum’s, for us in the village it says we have it and then blanks out all bar the very expensive convenience stores as we are just outside of range.

    Twice a month would still be awkward and require having an extra person on the insurance and paying them to take it to be charged and for those weeks when I do do more driving, it would be a nightmare. It’s not a comfort zone, it’s a capability zone. For it to be a viable option, we need loads more charging ports here and a way to charge at home for those without driveways. That said, I did think about getting a charging point put in at mum’s as she has a driveway and I spend a lot of time there but then realised it would be a non starter, she panics when we want to know her Wifi code let alone mess about with her electrics!

    As for a car change, I’m due to change my car right now (lease ends at the end of next month), nothing available on the scheme though within price range in normal cars, EV’s suitable for me and my wheelchair are pipe dreams amounts for the advance payment and completely unaffordable. I’ll be extending the lease and hope something comes up in the meantime.

    #161118 Reply
    Sue

    Brydo – 3 bed semi, on street parking. Lamp post right outside the house but being able to park there on a regular basis is an eek point. I’m currently parked on the green with no lamp posts nearby while my non disabled neighbour and family take up the parking outside my house (and theirs). I get lucky occasionally but not enough for it to be relied upon.

    Local council won’t touch this road for improvements, they class it as private land (social housing) when it comes to spending money on it and public land when it comes to making money on it. Our pavements are a nightmare, especially for a wheelchair, I’ve been here for almost 25 years, in that time they have redone the pavements and resurfaced the road leading to here 3 times, it’s not been done once on our road or pavements.

    #161122 Reply
    brydo

    In my area there are many disabled bays marked on the road directly out side the disabled persons door. Could that be done for you.

    How far is the “green” from your house? Could you get a cable from your house to it?

    An ideal situation would be to get a disabled bay next to the lamppost and get it adapted to a charger. Worth giving your local council a call to see if there’s anything they can do.

    Personally I would be getting a charger at your mum’s it seems the obvious solution.

    #161127 Reply
    Sue

    Brydo – I could apply for a disabled bay but I’ve missed my chance at the moment (BB runs out within the next year and they like to have over a year left on it to do a marked bay – I didn’t think I would be in this house for much longer so didn’t apply when there was sufficient time left). Still not a guarantee of a space though as opposite neighbour (who also parks outside the house), has a disabled child with a blue badge.

    A cable from the green would not be possible, it’s across the road and down a bit.

    Mum has a panic fit with much more minor things, it’s 50 questions and much wringing of hands about the safety of plugging a phone charger in, so a non starter.

    The best option would be to have a driveway installed but I don’t have the circa 4k to get it done nor the money to have a port installed or just stick to normal cars until things catch up locally and there are ports easily available/I finally move to a bungalow with a driveway and a port already installed/I stop driving.

    That is the thing, it’s not just the availability of a driveway but also the cost of having extra kit installed just so you can make a car go, that alone, even subsidised, is a massive barrier. Yes, you would eventually recoup that outlay but you have to have it actually there in the first place to pay it out.

    To be honest, I would love to have a driveway, have been yearning for a driveway, sought out possible grants for one (long story involving a (failed) disabled facilities grant, add on things via a local charity and massive disappointment and frustration) but is not to be. If I did have one, I would be seriously thinking about an EV, I’m not against them at all but right now and possibly for a fair few years to come, it is just not compatible with my situation.

    #161130 Reply
    Ian

    Interesting posts. I like my electric car. I could tell you how much I saved, how good it is for the environment and how its the first car in 20 years that is very different to anything I have driven previously.

    I do wish it would go further on a charge though. It suits me, it won’t suit everybody.

    What does suprise me is peoples attitude to EVs and the reaction this then gets because the EV baby has been called ugly…….

    I actually don’t think that EVs are the issue here I think its peoples inabality to listen, to communicate and to respect others opinions.

    Don’t talk about religion, politics and now EVs

    #161137 Reply
    Dougie Brimson

    Why do these debates always descend into ‘killing the planet’ ‘mass murderer’ ‘luddite’ type insults aimed at those of us who don’t intend to go the EV route?

    Do ‘WE’ ever claim that we think you’re wrong? Do we accuse you of ignoring the plight of the children used to mine the cobalt used in your batteries? Or go on about the long term damage that the disposal of those batteries will inevitably have? Do we complain about the ugly windmills that have come to blight this country? Or rant about the other numerous issues relating to EV’s which rarely get a mention? No.

    If we’re going to have this debate, have it. But keep the abuse and condescension out of it. It serves no one and achieves nothing.

    #161175 Reply
    bfoandc

    We have just changed to an EV in July and already we can’t imagine ever going back to an ICE.

    However, I know that not everyone could or would want to move to an EV now. I especially think that more imagination and investment needs to be expended in finding an answer for those who don’t have driveways or some guaranteed off road parking.

    Personally, I think that the ending of using petrol or diesel cars is going to present a challenge to Motability. The whole scheme is based on the leasing model. This means that our payments don’t have to cover the total cost of the vehicle, just the difference between the price new and the price in 3 years time. As the cut-off point for ICE vehicles nears, the 3 year values of those vehicles will plummet. I also think that manufacturers will be removing ICE vehicles ahead of the final date.

    I think that the improvement in range has made a huge difference and with the Kia/Hyundai EVs offering a 300 mile range they will attract many drivers. That convinced us to change and as the ranges extend further more people will be happy to make the move.

    #161177 Reply
    ajn

    bfoandc glad it’s worked out for you and you enjoy the whole process, wow though what a pleasant post..🙂

    #161541 Reply
    Adrian

    Went from diesel Kuga to Kona ultimate EV about a month ago

    We were reluctant to switch from diesel as we are very high milers, and thought the available EV’s on the scheme would be slow and whiny, conk out before reaching the end of the street, the kettle wouldn’t boil at the same time as charging the car….

    We tried the Kona EV on a whim purely because of the outrageously low AP. Came back from the test drive grinning like Cheshire cats and practically frog marched the salesman to his desk and forced him to take our money

    We’ve had a hiccup or two, see “maiden long distance journey” from a week or two ago, but this die hard petrol head will only go back to ICE if I can afford to run an Aston Martin as my second car for a Sunday afternoon drive. Instant convert. They are that good (if it suits your needs)

    #161542 Reply
    Lets Get Organised

    #161543 Reply
    Lets Get Organised

    #161544 Reply
    Serendipity
    Participant

     

    I’m sure the majority of EV users are also in favour of a rapid switch to renewable energy sources, it’s the climate change deniers that are slowing down the transition from fossil fuels

    #161549 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    It could of course be because no country in the world can ever rely on renewable energy sources alone, rather than some conspiracy you’ve made up, Serendipity.

    #161551 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Albania, Iceland, and Paraguay obtain essentially all of their electricity from renewable sources (Albania and Paraguay 100% from hydroelectricity, Iceland 72% hydro and 28% geothermal). Norway obtains nearly all of its electricity from renewable sources (97 percent from hydropower).

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #161552 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Renewables produced 97.4% of Scotland’s electricity in 2020, mostly from the country’s wind power. In 2015, Scotland generated 59% of its electricity consumption through renewable sources, exceeding the country’s goal of 50% renewable electricity by that year.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #161555 Reply
    Serendipity
    Participant

    @Brydo it’s a good ambition to have, especially as we live on an island where sea and wind power is in abundance, unless of course your ideologically tied to fossil fuels and spend too much time reading the Daily Mail.

    #161558 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Brydo, renewables did not produce 97.4% of Scotland’s electricity in 2020. You missed out the key word equivalent.  When the wind blows Scotland exports renewably sourced electricity, when it doesn’t Scotland imports electricity from mostly gas powered stations.  Without import and export of energy, Scotland could not provide a continuous supply from renewable energy alone.  The last figure I found from Scottish Power shows 50% of its energy is generated from gas – that may be out of date though.

    #161564 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Sadly this thread like so many has moved off topic.

    #161575 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Wigwam this is where V2G chargers come in to the equation, if most people with Evs have V2G chargers Scotland would produce virtually all the electricity we would need. Without them we will need to rely on stand alone batteries, however if we move to electric heating in homes we would be miles away from producing enough electricity.

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

Viewing 25 replies - 26 through 50 (of 70 total)
Reply To: Reply #161564 in Have you heard a BEV owner say “i don’t like it”?
Your information: