Has going Electric changed your driving habits?

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    Topic
  • #147680 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    A question for the others on here who have made the swap to driving an Electric vehicle, has it changed the way you drive?

    For me, I was already a pretty economical driver, but now I seem to be in a battle with the Miles per kW gauge…  I’m much smoother pulling away and getting up to speed, especially if there’s no one behind me, coming up to lights and roundabouts, I’m on the regen to avoid late braking and also if possible maintaining momentum, and tend to let the car coast when ever it’s going downhill.

    Even though the car is saving me 90% of the cost of driving an ICE, I seem to be driven to being even more economical, just wondered if this mindset was affecting others? And as to the miles/kW, so far the car average over 3600 miles is 4.5 miles/kW.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 25 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #147691 Reply
    Richard

    Before I had to switch to autos I was driving a Volvo 850 2.5 & I used to commute 30 miles each way & I could get serious economy outta that car into 5th ASAP & then pootle along & it could do that all day. Had to be like it due to economy.

    Since I’ve done veg oil for years had my own filtering setup saved a mint lol.

    I’m pretty sure I’ll be watching the dash next week same as you trying to eek out every last joule from the battery. I always used to enjoy the competition with myself watching the computer mpg going up.

    I can see at least short term enforced driving habits changing due to charging on longer journeys, I wonder if we’ll also see a reduction in accidents as breaks are forced so drivers end up less fatigued could be win/win for safety & environment

    #147696 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Driving an EV has made me much more aware that fossil van drivers are morons when they attempt last second braking into roundabouts to effect an overtake & they then end up desperately crunching their gears as they find the EV they are trying to overtake starts pulling away from them halfway around the roundabout.

    Other than that not much, I drive it like I stole it upto 60mph & go all economic at 60mph. I don’t really care about the consumption too much unless I’m trying to drive a long stretch between chargers, something you guys with the Kona won’t have to do so much.

    Charging stops make you plan more & take proper breaks.

    #147697 Reply
    Richardw
    Participant

    I have just ordered a hybrid and really hope my habits don’t change. I have a genuine love of driving and always have and I don’t want the whole experience ruined by constantly trying to keep consumption down etc. It’s very easy to spot people doing just that by not putting there foot down a bit when they come to an incline and therefore reaching the top at a greatly reduced speed etc This is just one example, there are many others! I’m hoping to save a considerable some of money by doing the 25 mile round trip school run in all electric mode but I’m certainly not going to ruin the whole driving experience by trying to save a few extra pence.

    #147710 Reply
    YorkMan
    Participant

    I think there is an opposite side to this, that EV’s can make you less efficient in your driving – for some at least.  Firstly, you are paying less to charge your car than fill it with petrol (unless you get stuck on certain motorway service stations and then you may pay just as much as petrol – as per a few YouTube reviews on certain networks).  Due to this feeling that you are “saving” money and the quick response from many EV’s I expect that for many the “fun” factor will be too much to ignore; pulling away quickly at lights and roundabouts and accelerating quickly and driving fast because when you get home you can just recharge – if you have a home charger.  So many EV’s may not be driven as economically as they can be.

    I am more interested in the “MPG” of EV’s on a motorway, actually driving at 70mph and how that affects the range, again I have seen a few reviews on Youtube (by respected reviewers who are actually using the EV in the real world) that have found if they started with a 200 mile range and travelled on a motorway at a regular 70mph (which I admit is hard these days!) then there range would fall twice as quick, ie, for every 5 miles they did they would lose 10 miles of range; or the “better” EV’s might lose 7 miles for every 5 miles travelled.  So you can start out with a 250 mile range, and travel at 70mph on a motorway to find that after 100 miles you only have 50-70 miles left and then need to think about recharging and where you are going to charge.  This is a problem given the unstructured nature of the Recharging system – which should be nationally planned to encourage drivers to take up EV’s and not left to the haphazzard “free” market that typically confuses so that it can “overcharge”.

    #147713 Reply
    Stuart
    Participant

    Opposite for me, i used to drive like the vicar in the ICE car. Had really calmed down over the years and would rather cruise in a little luxury than throw it into corners, but all that changed when i got the EV.

    Now i drive like Lewis Hamilton lol, but safely of course. the acceleration and handling is just addictive and i thought it would have worn off before now but nope. I used to dread driving sometimes as it was so dull but now i take every opportunity i can to get behind the wheel and enjoy myself. The stereo sounds awesome as well so thats a cherry on my cake too.

    ----------------------------
    KIA Soul EV First Edition
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    Scale modeller in my spare time
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    #147722 Reply
    Elliot
    Participant

    I’m dreading having to drive an EV. Most have terrible handling due to the heavy batteries and having to keep my eye on how much battery is left on a journey just doesn’t float my boat. Knowing I can go on a journey with a range of over 500 miles despite how I drive is so much more appealing to me.

    I just hope the technology moves on rapidly before I’m forced into driving one.

    #147723 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    I’m dreading having to drive an EV. Most have terrible handling due to the heavy batteries

    Out of interest, have you actually driven a modern EV, my cars handling is on a par with my last car, and the performance far exceeds it!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #147726 Reply
    Ian

    Since getting my EV I’ve actually started to enjoy driving again. Previous cars have been very similar in what they do and how they do it…….

    #147727 Reply
    Elliot
    Participant

    I’m dreading having to drive an EV. Most have terrible handling due to the heavy batteries

    Out of interest, have you actually driven a modern EV, my cars handling is on a par with my last car, and the performance far exceeds it!

    Yes I’ve driven a couple. Both seemed far too heavy for their size and didn’t handle anything like their non electric counterparts.

    #147730 Reply
    Richardw
    Participant

    I’m dreading having to drive an EV. Most have terrible handling due to the heavy batteries

    Out of interest, have you actually driven a modern EV, my cars handling is on a par with my last car, and the performance far exceeds it!

    Yes I’ve driven a couple. Both seemed far too heavy for their size and didn’t handle anything like their non electric counterparts.

    It is a well documented fact that battery weight  affects handling and not in a good way. Some benefits arise from a low centre of gravity but overall the cars feel heavier and far less agile.

    I think when we were talking about the driving experience being spoilt it was because people would be driving to get the most range out of their batteries rather than just driving normally, regardless of the handling characteristics of the vehicle.

    #147733 Reply
    Richard

    I think we need to be clear, there’s sensible drivimg to get maximum benefit which is acceptable & then there’s ott stuff like slowing tight down on a hill & inconveniencing others which is unacceptable & verging on dangerous. One does not necessarily run into the other.

    As for ruined driving experience, I think you’re expecting too much, subconsciously biased or just made your mind up before getting in the car.

    If you’re anti BEV then stick with Dino juice for now there’s nothing wrong with doing so if your use case warrants it & some do esp towing for example.

    I just don’t really get the ruined handling comment, very few reviewers have said this, occasionally you get mentions of body roll or wallowing but that’s not exclusively to do with being a BEV, I’ve drove ICE that weigh as much as EVs like the Toyota Estima, 2 tons. Being heavy isn’t a reserve of battery laden cars.

    Take the Tesla models for example no one is saying they are bulky heavy with crap compromised handling are they? The MG5 I test drove completely fired you back into the seat on acceleration, I didn’t rag it round corners as those days are long gone for me & I simply don’t care but it drove very competently on very horrible rural roads covered in potholes & wrecked passing points.

    There also needs to be a distinction between an EV conversion like the Kona for example & pure EV design like the Zoe or Ioniq as the cars available as both are the ones more compromised.

    I think if you took a fresh look & acknowledged that perhaps you may have been a bit unfair maybe & give these cars an honest chance if interested in one.

    I’ve must’ve driven hundreds of different makes & models over the years including doing 200 miles a say at one point as a field engineer driving all over the UK so I like to think I’ve got a decent base of experience to pull from there, I haven’t driven a lot of EVs unlike some but those I have driven have felt quite good when driven inside the safety envelope & not trying to pull a Richard Hammond 🤣😉

     

    #147734 Reply
    Richard

    By anti BEV I don’t mean that in a rude way. I don’t mean you’re saying all EVs are rubbish, flawed tech blah blah I just meant a BEV doesn’t fit your use criteria

    #147738 Reply
    Richardw
    Participant

    I think you’re missing the point of the original thread. Its a change in driving style based on getting the most out of your batteries, nothing more.

    #147740 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    I think you’re missing the point of the original thread. Its a change in driving style based on getting the most out of your batteries, nothing more.

    It is a well documented fact that battery weight affects handling and not in a good way. Some benefits arise from a low centre of gravity but overall the cars feel heavier and far less agile. I think when we were talking about the driving experience being spoilt it was because people would be driving to get the most range out of their batteries rather than just driving normally, regardless of the handling characteristics of the vehicle.

    My post was about has owning affected an EV changed your habits, and you make a comment about it being a well documented fact that EV’s have compromised handling due to weight!

    Well, firstly I’d disagree (Obviously) Yes, they weigh more, but they, especially the newer vehicles have the power and torque to not only reduce it, but overcome it, the weight also in my opinion is a real advantage, all low down, reducing the Centre of Gravity, and also getting the weight more balanced, that’s why supercars go mid engine.  The biggest compromises with EV’s are range and for some engine noise, but for many others this is a great bonus.

    Also, so far, I seem to be the only one going for the extra economy, all the other owners are really enjoying the performance and, to quote Gothitjulie, “driving it like they stole it!”, and maybe that’s due more to the fact I can’t charge at home, but I certainly enjoy driving again, and I do have my moments, especially enjoyed watching an M5 in my rear view mirror at 3 consecutive sets of traffic lights last week, if he hadn’t been slipping the clutch and trying to inch forward, I probably wouldn’t have bothered, but it did put a smile on my face!

    I’m driving more smoothly, not slower, and as I said, if there are vehicles behind me, I tend to get upto speed much quicker, but if the road behind is clear, I go for economy, if I need to get somewhere, economy goes out the window, but if I’m in no rush, I try and get the best economy I can

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #147747 Reply
    Mike

    Just ignore Elliot he makes these idiotic unfounded comments to get a reaction. All his comments are negative about cars and the scheme. Never anything positive.

    #147748 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    We drive a PHEV has it changed our driving style of course it has, we are really extracting as much energy  as possible from the regeneration system, it now has become second nature to the point, if we are drive in ICE Mode (engine running) for every 3 miles we are driving we gain 1 miles of EV mode from the excess energy being generated/harvested.

    Over the last 11 months we are averaging 120 mpg compared to our previous Motability Ford Kuga Diesel 150 bhp Powershift average 40 mpg. So yes it has and a buy product I am already £800 up on fuel savings


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #147749 Reply
    Oscarmax
    Participant

    Just ignore Elliot he makes these idiotic unfounded comments to get a reaction. All his comments are negative about cars and the scheme. Never anything positive.

    There is an old saying ’empty vessel make most noise’


    In 2005 I suffered a brain injury which has left me with mental and physical disabilities.
    Unfortunately I do get confused and get things wrong, so I apologise in advance.

    #147762 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Agreed. When I read comments, three things come to mind, how the article/comment is written, secondly who wrote it and finally their credibility. Some can write with authority and first hand knowledge and therefore it is worthy of a read.

    #147767 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Agreed. When I read comments, three things come to mind, how the article/comment is written, secondly who wrote it and finally their credibility. Some can write with authority and first hand knowledge and therefore it is worthy of a read.

    A perfect summation of the perils of the internet, Well thought out and succinctly delivered.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #147783 Reply
    Elliot
    Participant

    @Mike, you are talking absolute rubbish. I have said plenty of positive things about the scheme and I’m especially pleased with my new car from Motability. As for the other comments, yes an electric vehicle would change my driving style massively. I enjoy nothing more than a twisty road using the paddle shifts to change up and down the gears. Every road test I’ve read about EV’s state that handling is compromised due to the weight of the batteries. It was certainly noticeable in the 2 EV’s that I’ve driven. In the future I’m sure that battery technology will have moved on and weight will be something that will surely be looked at. Reducing weight will also lengthen the amount of miles you can travel without recharging. I need something that can do at least 400 miles in a day without stopping and recharging. I am not knocking EV’s as they suit a lot of people, but sadly not me at this point in time.

    #147845 Reply
    Elliot
    Participant

    I take it this forum is no longer moderated and people are allowed to abuse posters.

    #147847 Reply
    wmcforum
    Which Mobility Car

    I take it this forum is no longer moderated and people are allowed to abuse posters.

    Fully moderated.

    We did not view the comment from Mike as abuse.

    #147849 Reply
    Elliot
    Participant

    Mike your post is the very definition of idiotic.

    #147850 Reply
    Elliot
    Participant

    Agreed. When I read comments, three things come to mind, how the article/comment is written, secondly who wrote it and finally their credibility. Some can write with authority and first hand knowledge and therefore it is worthy of a read.

    Can you elaborate on this comment?

    #147855 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Agreed. When I read comments, three things come to mind, how the article/comment is written, secondly who wrote it and finally their credibility. Some can write with authority and first hand knowledge and therefore it is worthy of a read.

    Can you elaborate on this comment?

    It speaks for itself. A principle I apply to articles, reviews news stories, in fact everything.

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