Game changer all-electric Hyundai Ioniq 5

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  • #141013 Reply
    Brydo

    The new Ioniq 5 – the first model from Hyundai’s all-electric sub-brand – takes design influence from the 45 Concept and will be offered with two battery sizes

    This is the Hyundai Ioniq 5, the first model from the Korean manufacturer’s new all-electric sub-brand and a car designed to take on everything from the Volkswagen ID.3 and ID.4 to the Tesla Model 3.

    The Ioniq name has appeared on a single vehicle before, but the Ioniq 5 will spearhead a far grander assault on the market. It will be joined by a swoopy saloon and a full-height SUV within the coming years, as well as smaller models.

    The 5 is a 4.6-metre-long hatchback although, like its rival the ID.3, the positioning of the battery pack in the floor lifts the passenger compartment to a height where Hyundai is actually referring to the body style as a crossover.

    The car is based on Hyundai’s all-new electric vehicle platform, called E-GMP. This is reflected in a particularly long wheelbase for a vehicle of this size; at 3,000mm it’s longer than that of an Audi A6, even though the new EV is more than 300mm shorter than the executive saloon overall. The wheelbase is also around 250mm longer than the ID.4’s, a potential key EV rival. Hyundai has confirmed that the suspension configuration is MacPherson struts at the front and a multi-link set-up at the rear.

    The looks of the Ioniq 5 are inspired by a show car that Hyundai produced in the seventies. Based on the humble Pony hatchback, the Pony Coupe Concept was a striking sharp-edged creation penned by Giorgetto Giugiaro at ItalDesign. This, in turn, influenced the 45 Concept, a show car that previewed the Ioniq 5 back in 2019.

    The production model doesn’t look quite as rakish as either concept – blame the battery pack in the floor for that – but it is still a striking creation from a company that is becoming increasingly confident in its design language. There are a number of new steps for Hyundai in its detailing, such as a clamshell bonnet and flush door handles, but the overall treatment is very clean and simple, without a great deal of fussy surfacing on the panels.

    The 45 Concept’s ultra-slim headlights have been transferred successfully, while a conventional front grille has also been replaced (due to the relative lack of demand for cooling in an EV like this) by a ‘sensor area’ that houses the hardware for the car’s driving assistance systems.

    Hyundai’s head of design for Ioniq, Luc Donckerwolke, told us, “I didn’t want to do business as usual with this car. I wanted to give it a certain relevance by going back in the history of Hyundai – not a retro car, but taking the essence of that design.

    “We tend to see, in the whole world now, design getting overloaded with elements. But the Pony Coupe was delivering me a car that had a clean, pure aura that I wanted to understand and project into the future.”

    Range and charging
    Hyundai already has extensive experience selling pure-electric vehicles, with the Ioniq EV and the well-received Kona Electric. The Ioniq 5 takes that know-how and adds cutting-edge technology, some of which has never been available before at the car’s likely price point.

    For starters, the Ioniq 5 features an 800V battery system, meaning that it is capable of super-fast charging normally reserved for more premium vehicles. Hyundai claims that it can receive charging feeds up to 220kW, allowing the battery to be replenished from 10 per cent to 80 per cent of its capacity in 18 minutes. Customers would be able to add around 100km (62 miles) of range in five minutes, the company says.

    In addition, the Ioniq 5’s charging system has bi-directional functionality. This is most likely to be used in the cabin, where a conventional 220V power socket will allow users to plug in a laptop, for example. But the car’s charging port – situated at the rearmost tip, beyond the back wheel – can also export charge as well as receiving it. So in theory, the 5 could provide electricity to another vehicle at up to 3.6kW via a conventional Type 2 cable.

    The Ioniq 5 will be launched with a choice of two battery sizes, four power outputs and rear- or four-wheel drive. The entry point will be a 58kWh version that has a single rear motor producing 168bhp and 350Nm for a 0-62mph time of 8.5 seconds. The bigger-battery edition can hold 72.6kWh of energy and a beefier 215bhp motor, although its torque figure remains the same. It can reach 62mph in 7.4 seconds.

    The Ioniq 5 will be launched with a choice of two battery sizes, four power outputs and rear- or four-wheel drive. The entry point will be a 58kWh version that has a single rear motor producing 168bhp and 350Nm for a 0-62mph time of 8.5 seconds. The bigger-battery edition can hold 72.6kWh of energy and a beefier 215bhp motor, although its torque figure remains the same. It can reach 62mph in 7.4 seconds.

    In an unusual move, the front seats can be completely reclined, allowing their occupants to, in theory, take naps while waiting for their car to recharge. The console slides fore and aft by 140mm, allowing the space to be customised.

    Rear passengers should benefit from slim front-seat backrests that boost leg room, plus a flat floor made possible by the lack of a transmission tunnel. The second row of seats also slides fore and aft, so the priority can shift between cabin space and boot capacity.

    The boot offers 531 litres of capacity – comfortably clear of the space offered by most family hatchbacks – and this can be expanded to 1,591 litres with the second row of seats folded down. There’s also a small storage area beneath the bonnet that could be used for the charging cables; it measures 57 litres in single-motor versions, and 24 litres in four-wheel-drive editions.

    The Ioniq 5 should go on sale in the UK this summer. No details have been issued on pricing, but Auto Express understands that the new car’s line-up should start roughly where the Kona Electric range stops. That would give the Ioniq 5 a potential starting price of around £38,000 after the £3,000 government plug-in car grant. It will be launched with a high-spec edition, though, called ‘Project 45’, and that’s likely to cost at least £45,000.

    Rear passengers should benefit from slim front-seat backrests that boost leg room, plus a flat floor made possible by the lack of a transmission tunnel. The second row of seats also slides fore and aft, so the priority can shift between cabin space and boot capacity.

    The boot offers 531 litres of capacity – comfortably clear of the space offered by most family hatchbacks – and this can be expanded to 1,591 litres with the second row of seats folded down. There’s also a small storage area beneath the bonnet that could be used for the charging cables; it measures 57 litres in single-motor versions, and 24 litres in four-wheel-drive editions.

    The Ioniq 5 should go on sale in the UK this summer. No details have been issued on pricing, but Auto Express understands that the new car’s line-up should start roughly where the Kona Electric range stops. That would give the Ioniq 5 a potential starting price of around £38,000 after the £3,000 government plug-in car grant. It will be launched with a high-spec edition, though, called ‘Project 45’, and that’s likely to cost at least £45,000.

    Q: Why go for a retro-influenced design for a brand new model and sub-brand?

    A: At Hyundai things go so fast that we never talk about what happened even last year – let alone further back. We always go forward; it’s the first time I arrived at a design studio to find there was no design archive.

    So I knew the Pony had been designed by Giugiaro, but had never seen the Pony Coupe before. The model disappeared, the show car disappeared – and I was amazed by the fact that the roots were to be found in Turin. I don’t think what we have produced is retro, in fact; it has the purity and the construction of the shapes of the Pony Coupe. There’s a parallel between the beginning of Hyundai 50 years ago and a new beginning now.

    Q: Those fully reclining seats are a novel feature. Do you seriously think people will take a nap in them while they wait for the car to charge?

    A: Why not? We’re working so hard to reduce charging times, but why not invest some effort in making it relaxing? Sometimes you have to wait for a charger to be available, even before you can plug in. That 10 minutes of relaxing time can be golden, even if it’s only that period in the middle of a 400-mile journey. It’s really important.

    We tried hard to make the cabin a more social place, because the younger generation want to spend more time with friends in the car. It’s a social habit thing, and we’ve been forced to pay more attention to that.

    Q: This is the start of Ioniq, and the start of this new platform. Can it be made smaller as well as larger?

    A: We can reduce the wheelbase, so further models are possible – shorter or longer, higher or lower. You will see more models coming.

     

Viewing 9 replies - 26 through 34 (of 34 total)
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  • #141195 Reply
    Richard

    As for catching ICE up I believe Samsung are close to releasing new solid state battery tech which features the same capacity at 50% volume so a substantial improvement.

    After that there’s glass substrate batteries coming which are something like 10x the capacity & charge in seconds being worked on by the guy that invented lithium tech batteries John B Goodenough (best name ever)

    #141200 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Richard, I wouldn’t get carried away with manufacturers claims about battery development. Samsung aren’t alone in attempting to bring solid state battery from theory into practice and no one has claimed being close to releasing a battery suitable for EVs.  I’m sure they will get there but not for quite a few years yet.

    #141206 Reply
    Clipped wings

    Some great innovation from Hyundai. Solar panel roof. A power socket allowing the battery to be used as a power source. Might come in handy as allegedly the UKs grid is going to be on a knife edge next winter. Need to learn lessons from Texas, an oil and gas rich state with the Permian basin, but over reliance on renewables that failed in a weather event.

    #141209 Reply
    Clipped wings

    Hi Richard,

    can avoid queuing to pay and remain socially distanced at Shell petrol stations with their Go+ app. Works a treat and I also use their fuel service for disabled app. No need to leave my seat.

    #141233 Reply
    Harry

    @Richard does these new batteries make EVs even nore expensive or will they bring the prices down?

    #141254 Reply
    Ellie

    Always enjoy your posts about EV’s @Brydo. Although I’ve never been particularly interested in cars, other than to get me from A to B, the rate of progress with EV’s is very interesting to watch.

    Love the idea of a solar roof on this Ioniq. It can tow too. Good interior and boot space.

    Andrew Till has recently uploaded a YouTube video about the car for anybody who wants to watch it https://youtu.be/Jy2VDs3ZeM0

    We have now had our EV since September last year. We will only be doing a couple of long journeys a year and do all our charging at home on the drive. It is incredibly convenient (and cheap). In the process of changing over to octopus and will be able to charge for 4p kWh, which will make it even cheaper.

    There has been a lot of casual interest in the car. Peoples awareness about EV’s is certainly increasing.

    #141439 Reply
    Brydo
    Participant

    Thanks Ellie, here’s some more info on this car.

    Hyundai marks >200,000 interest expressions for Ioniq 5

    Hyundai has reported a high level of interest in the 800-volt electric vehicle less than a week after the Ioniq 5 world premiere. Customers in Europe have submitted 236,000 expressions of interest for the special edition ‘Project 45’. Production is limited to 3,000 units, so it was sold out within a few hours.

    The planned production of ‘Project 45’ – full details of which can be found in our report on the premiere of the Ioniq 5 – was “almost three times oversubscribed” within 24 hours, Hyundai said. In the release, the Korean company states that the Ioniq 5 “quickly generated a very high level of website traffic and social media engagement with consumers in Europe – more than Hyundai had ever recorded for such an event.” The feedback even surpassed the 2020 result for the new-generation internal combustion Tucson, they said.

    However, the virtual launch and reservation startup has arguably caused problems. Originally, the ‘Project 45’ special model was available for reservation from the premiere day, i.e. 23 February. Then Hyundai delayed the date for the activation of the portal to 25 February.

    As the electric car portal Nextmove reported, there were technical problems repeatedly even on this date. Besides, it was probably not yet possible to reserve a specific car. It is probably a multi-stage selection process: at the end of the registration, interested parties only received a message that they were among the first 3,000 interested parties; Hyundai would contact them in the coming days.

    Hyundai itself is naturally pleased with the feedback on the new electric car. The “exceptionally high level of interest” in the Ioniq 5 underscores Hyundai’s strength in zero-emission mobility, says Andreas-Christoph Hofmann, Vice President Marketing & Product at Hyundai Motor Europe. “With its ultra-fast charging, long-range and customisable interior space, the IONIQ 5 is a game-changer that sets the benchmark in its class – and these outstanding characteristics have immediately proved to be attractive to significant numbers of European customers.”

    The Ioniq 5 is known to be the first model built on Hyundai-Kia’s new E-GMP electric platform. This will make the Ioniq 5 the first volume model with 800-volt batteries. The first electric Kia based on E-GMP is to follow later this year. Hyundai has expanded the model name Ioniq into its own sub-brand for the E-GMP platform – the electric CUV (crossover utility vehicle) Ioniq 5 is to be followed by an electric sedan called Ioniq 6 and an electric SUV (Ioniq 7).

    The only person who got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe.
    Anything i post over three lines long please assume it is an article lol.

    #141441 Reply
    Harry

    Just been reading more about this car… The prices banded about are insane. So after the gov grant its going to cost 45k just 1k less than Model Y

    “Yet, convert those £48,000 to dollars, and you end up with a price of $67,700 under the current exchange rate. The Model Y Long Range costs $48,990. Tesla charges $60,990 for the Performance version.

    If we compare the Ioniq 5 to the VW ID.4, the First Edition will cost $45,190. Pick the Mustang Mach-E and the GT – the most expensive derivative of Ford’s electric crossover – will cost $60,500”

    I honestly dont see this car coming to Motability.

    #141709 Reply
    Tharg
    Participant

    Announcement of this promising looking BEV is now nearly two weeks old. However, there have been no video or printed reviews/road tests that I can find. They normally follow announcement within a day or two. Is there a problem?

    Plenty of good (manufacturer?) video though. Only just noticed the two opening flaps at foot of front air-dam. You expect a set of machine guns or missiles to roll out as in a James Bond car. Be well useful on M25!

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