Game changer all-electric Hyundai Ioniq 5

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  • #141013 Reply
    Brydo

    The new Ioniq 5 – the first model from Hyundai’s all-electric sub-brand – takes design influence from the 45 Concept and will be offered with two battery sizes

    This is the Hyundai Ioniq 5, the first model from the Korean manufacturer’s new all-electric sub-brand and a car designed to take on everything from the Volkswagen ID.3 and ID.4 to the Tesla Model 3.

    The Ioniq name has appeared on a single vehicle before, but the Ioniq 5 will spearhead a far grander assault on the market. It will be joined by a swoopy saloon and a full-height SUV within the coming years, as well as smaller models.

    The 5 is a 4.6-metre-long hatchback although, like its rival the ID.3, the positioning of the battery pack in the floor lifts the passenger compartment to a height where Hyundai is actually referring to the body style as a crossover.

    The car is based on Hyundai’s all-new electric vehicle platform, called E-GMP. This is reflected in a particularly long wheelbase for a vehicle of this size; at 3,000mm it’s longer than that of an Audi A6, even though the new EV is more than 300mm shorter than the executive saloon overall. The wheelbase is also around 250mm longer than the ID.4’s, a potential key EV rival. Hyundai has confirmed that the suspension configuration is MacPherson struts at the front and a multi-link set-up at the rear.

    The looks of the Ioniq 5 are inspired by a show car that Hyundai produced in the seventies. Based on the humble Pony hatchback, the Pony Coupe Concept was a striking sharp-edged creation penned by Giorgetto Giugiaro at ItalDesign. This, in turn, influenced the 45 Concept, a show car that previewed the Ioniq 5 back in 2019.

    The production model doesn’t look quite as rakish as either concept – blame the battery pack in the floor for that – but it is still a striking creation from a company that is becoming increasingly confident in its design language. There are a number of new steps for Hyundai in its detailing, such as a clamshell bonnet and flush door handles, but the overall treatment is very clean and simple, without a great deal of fussy surfacing on the panels.

    The 45 Concept’s ultra-slim headlights have been transferred successfully, while a conventional front grille has also been replaced (due to the relative lack of demand for cooling in an EV like this) by a ‘sensor area’ that houses the hardware for the car’s driving assistance systems.

    Hyundai’s head of design for Ioniq, Luc Donckerwolke, told us, “I didn’t want to do business as usual with this car. I wanted to give it a certain relevance by going back in the history of Hyundai – not a retro car, but taking the essence of that design.

    “We tend to see, in the whole world now, design getting overloaded with elements. But the Pony Coupe was delivering me a car that had a clean, pure aura that I wanted to understand and project into the future.”

    Range and charging
    Hyundai already has extensive experience selling pure-electric vehicles, with the Ioniq EV and the well-received Kona Electric. The Ioniq 5 takes that know-how and adds cutting-edge technology, some of which has never been available before at the car’s likely price point.

    For starters, the Ioniq 5 features an 800V battery system, meaning that it is capable of super-fast charging normally reserved for more premium vehicles. Hyundai claims that it can receive charging feeds up to 220kW, allowing the battery to be replenished from 10 per cent to 80 per cent of its capacity in 18 minutes. Customers would be able to add around 100km (62 miles) of range in five minutes, the company says.

    In addition, the Ioniq 5’s charging system has bi-directional functionality. This is most likely to be used in the cabin, where a conventional 220V power socket will allow users to plug in a laptop, for example. But the car’s charging port – situated at the rearmost tip, beyond the back wheel – can also export charge as well as receiving it. So in theory, the 5 could provide electricity to another vehicle at up to 3.6kW via a conventional Type 2 cable.

    The Ioniq 5 will be launched with a choice of two battery sizes, four power outputs and rear- or four-wheel drive. The entry point will be a 58kWh version that has a single rear motor producing 168bhp and 350Nm for a 0-62mph time of 8.5 seconds. The bigger-battery edition can hold 72.6kWh of energy and a beefier 215bhp motor, although its torque figure remains the same. It can reach 62mph in 7.4 seconds.

    The Ioniq 5 will be launched with a choice of two battery sizes, four power outputs and rear- or four-wheel drive. The entry point will be a 58kWh version that has a single rear motor producing 168bhp and 350Nm for a 0-62mph time of 8.5 seconds. The bigger-battery edition can hold 72.6kWh of energy and a beefier 215bhp motor, although its torque figure remains the same. It can reach 62mph in 7.4 seconds.

    In an unusual move, the front seats can be completely reclined, allowing their occupants to, in theory, take naps while waiting for their car to recharge. The console slides fore and aft by 140mm, allowing the space to be customised.

    Rear passengers should benefit from slim front-seat backrests that boost leg room, plus a flat floor made possible by the lack of a transmission tunnel. The second row of seats also slides fore and aft, so the priority can shift between cabin space and boot capacity.

    The boot offers 531 litres of capacity – comfortably clear of the space offered by most family hatchbacks – and this can be expanded to 1,591 litres with the second row of seats folded down. There’s also a small storage area beneath the bonnet that could be used for the charging cables; it measures 57 litres in single-motor versions, and 24 litres in four-wheel-drive editions.

    The Ioniq 5 should go on sale in the UK this summer. No details have been issued on pricing, but Auto Express understands that the new car’s line-up should start roughly where the Kona Electric range stops. That would give the Ioniq 5 a potential starting price of around £38,000 after the £3,000 government plug-in car grant. It will be launched with a high-spec edition, though, called ‘Project 45’, and that’s likely to cost at least £45,000.

    Rear passengers should benefit from slim front-seat backrests that boost leg room, plus a flat floor made possible by the lack of a transmission tunnel. The second row of seats also slides fore and aft, so the priority can shift between cabin space and boot capacity.

    The boot offers 531 litres of capacity – comfortably clear of the space offered by most family hatchbacks – and this can be expanded to 1,591 litres with the second row of seats folded down. There’s also a small storage area beneath the bonnet that could be used for the charging cables; it measures 57 litres in single-motor versions, and 24 litres in four-wheel-drive editions.

    The Ioniq 5 should go on sale in the UK this summer. No details have been issued on pricing, but Auto Express understands that the new car’s line-up should start roughly where the Kona Electric range stops. That would give the Ioniq 5 a potential starting price of around £38,000 after the £3,000 government plug-in car grant. It will be launched with a high-spec edition, though, called ‘Project 45’, and that’s likely to cost at least £45,000.

    Q: Why go for a retro-influenced design for a brand new model and sub-brand?

    A: At Hyundai things go so fast that we never talk about what happened even last year – let alone further back. We always go forward; it’s the first time I arrived at a design studio to find there was no design archive.

    So I knew the Pony had been designed by Giugiaro, but had never seen the Pony Coupe before. The model disappeared, the show car disappeared – and I was amazed by the fact that the roots were to be found in Turin. I don’t think what we have produced is retro, in fact; it has the purity and the construction of the shapes of the Pony Coupe. There’s a parallel between the beginning of Hyundai 50 years ago and a new beginning now.

    Q: Those fully reclining seats are a novel feature. Do you seriously think people will take a nap in them while they wait for the car to charge?

    A: Why not? We’re working so hard to reduce charging times, but why not invest some effort in making it relaxing? Sometimes you have to wait for a charger to be available, even before you can plug in. That 10 minutes of relaxing time can be golden, even if it’s only that period in the middle of a 400-mile journey. It’s really important.

    We tried hard to make the cabin a more social place, because the younger generation want to spend more time with friends in the car. It’s a social habit thing, and we’ve been forced to pay more attention to that.

    Q: This is the start of Ioniq, and the start of this new platform. Can it be made smaller as well as larger?

    A: We can reduce the wheelbase, so further models are possible – shorter or longer, higher or lower. You will see more models coming.

     

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 34 total)
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  • #141023 Reply
    Andyjm2uk
    Participant

    Looks great..

    But why not make the wheels follow the line of the wheel arches on both sides.  Its one of those things that is going to bug you once you have seen it….

    #141024 Reply
    joss
    Moderator

    I watched the presentation video the other day on this. All very interesting I thought. I like the very modern look of the car.

    Joss
    ***🌻🌻🌻 ***
    Current car BMW X2 2.0i Sport sDrive Auto 2019 with Sport pack
    Last car Ford Focus Titanium 1.5 TDCI
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    #141034 Reply
    Abercol
    Participant

    Too high a price for the scheme, so irrelevant. It’s a £38k starter, probably more as they don’t usually come in at the prices mentioned in these initial blurbs.

    In life, it's not who you know that's important, it's how your wife found out.

    #141036 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Too high a price for the scheme, so irrelevant. It’s a £38k starter, probably more as they don’t usually come in at the prices mentioned in these initial blurbs.

    Considering there are cars on the scheme costing nearly £50K already, your comment is also sadly but thankfully irrelevant

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Intranicity.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #141054 Reply
    sif

    what precisely are these 50k cars?

    #141055 Reply
    sif

    Much as I enjoy your  postings Brydo, I am beginning to regard them as clickbait. Its a site for motability cars. I think you are doing a great job, and you certainly make the site more interesting, but I think your postings about developments which may at some time, however unlikely, appear on the scheme should perhaps be under a separate heading like, ‘Things to come’ or ‘whats happening in auto development’. I have lost count of the times I have eagerly clicked on a column of yours only to find its not on the scheme and unlikely to come on the scheme. Its great general auto news. But it isn’t always that relevant to the reason I visit the site. Great work. Just needs signposting better.

    #141057 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    what precisely are these 50k cars?

    The most expensive car I can find currently is the Vauxhall Vivaro Life in Elite spec and full EV at £47k but there are lots of others that are still pretty pricy, Volvo XC40 Inscription Pro PHEV at £42K, Merc Benz GLA in Premium Plus at £39, Peugeot e2008 Premium Plus at £39k, Audi Q3 Sport Quattro at £37k and there are many more I’m sure.  The IONIQ 5 after the EV £3k rebate will probably start at around £35K, so no reason it won’t appear on the scheme.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #141058 Reply
    ChrisK
    Participant

    Too high a price for the scheme, so irrelevant. It’s a £38k starter, probably more as they don’t usually come in at the prices mentioned in these initial blurbs.

    Yep same goes for the new KIA Sorento that caught my eye last week being a seven seated car that for myself would become a 5 seat car and room to get disabled things in the boot but alas, hybrid comes at a starting price of £38,000 and the EV version rolls in at £44,000.

    #141059 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    Who decides if a vehicle comes on the scheme though, is it Motability or the manufactures, I listed some vehicles above all over that price and the Toyota Proace Verso is on the scheme as well, that’s nearly £46k.  Not sure price is necessarily a limiting factor, I think often Motability take what they are offered and will go for higher priced models if the deal they are offered makes sense.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #141060 Reply
    ChrisK
    Participant

    @Intranicity

    What I think is the EV’s are not going to get the manufacturers discount to Motability that some higher priced fossil cars get, why would they when they can sale as fast as they can make them, so I don’t expect to see any £38,000 plus EV’s appearing any time soon as car makers are not mugs.

    Just my thoughts though and hope I’m wrong and your right.

     

     

    #141061 Reply
    Brydo

    Sif I only post what’s available on the “interweb” and things I find interesting, and hope others find interesting too. If I only post about things available on motability there will be very few posts indeed, also cars come off and on the scheme on a regular basis so something posted today could be off the list tomorrow.

    There are also many two car families on the forum so interest is there outside the scheme.

    As I’ve always said the key to keeping this excellent Forum successful is to keep the motability “experts” (which i am not one) on it, and engaged.

    #141062 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    @Intranicity What I think is the EV’s are not going to get the manufacturers discount to Motability that some higher priced fossil cars get, why would they when they can sale as fast as they can make them, so I don’t expect to see any £38,000 plus EV’s appearing any time soon as car makers are not mugs. Just my thoughts though and hope I’m wrong and your right.

    I see what you mean, but the Vauxhall Vivaro E Life Elite is on at £47k,  Peugeot e-2008 Premium GT is on at £39k, and Kona Premium SE Electric at £41k are already on the scheme.  Service costs are much cheaper too which might help?

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Intranicity.

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #141064 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    I may be wrong, but I seem to recall that the base price for a model of car determines if the car gets on the scheme allowing more expensive variants to also be offered.

    #141065 Reply
    DBtruth
    Participant

    New technology is always going to be expensive but cars like this won’t be this expensive forever. I think this shows another step forward in terms of charging times which is good. I doubt this particular model will make it onto the scheme but it’s interesting to see how the technology is improving. It won’t be too long before this level of charging and range is standard and the newer cars will be even better than that

    #141083 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    Currently many car manufacturers charge a premium for their BEVs, but in the UK there is a change happening, as the Pound appreciates against the US Dollar, the Tesla becomes cheaper. At what point does a Tesla become cheaper than BEVs built in the EU, & will the EU car companies drop their prices or simply go out of business in the UK?

     

    #141085 Reply
    Harry

    38k for a small Hyundai…the world has gone completely bonkers.

    “In an unusual move, the front seats can be completely reclined, allowing their occupants to, in theory, take naps while waiting for their car to recharge”

    How about we just fill up with petrol in 1 minute so no need for naps and the people of Britian could save 18k on a small Hyundai. Its lije this ev train everyone is on is going backwards rather than forwards.

    Would a small 38k Hyundai even be available on Motability? We dont get the i30 and that is far cheaper.

    #141088 Reply
    Brydo

    Harry with more manufacturers committing to go all electric by 2025, if their cars don’t appear on the scheme there will be few cars to choose from.

    We are in the “when” phase of all electric not the “if” phase so its time for everyone to accept this and demand they appear on the scheme in numbers.

    We can be at the forefront of the EV revolution creating millions of jobs or we can bury our heads in the sand and lose out.

    #141094 Reply
    Intranicity
    Participant

    38k for a small Hyundai…the world has gone completely bonkers.

    This small Hyundai has a bigger wheelbase than an Audi A6, its far from a small car!

    Previous Motability Cars
    2006 - 2009 Skoda Superb VR6 2.0tdi
    2009 - 2012 Citroen C5 2.0tdi VTR Nav
    2012 - 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.5dci tekna
    2015 - 2018 Ford Kuga 2.0tdi Titanium X
    2018 - 2021 BMW 220d X drive 2 Series Active Luxury
    2021- Hyundai Kona Electric Premium SE

    #141128 Reply
    Harry

    Having a look at Hyundai dimensions your right its not that small but again not that large. Its inbetween an i30 and i40.

    Still for me 38k for a medium sized Hyundai is far to expensive.

    You can currently get a Jaguar XE R-Dynamic currently for 32k and thats a massive step up from a Hyundai and theres no need to goto sleep while you fill it up with juice on your way from A to B.

    You can get a i30 N for 28k 10k less. Its insane.

    #141135 Reply
    Ian

    Yes initial cost of outlay for an Ev is expensive but when you consider fuel savings the gap narrows. That said 10k buys an awful lot of fuel!

    #141174 Reply
    Harry

    A Nissan Leaf has a 600 pound saving a year vs a Note diesel over 10k miles. You would need to keep your electric car an awfully long time for you to say you actually saving money.

    #141178 Reply
    Brydo

    Harry the BEV versus ICE debate is over, its a bit like Brexit there is no point in fighting it, just try and get an EV that suits your needs.

    We are heading in “one direction” did you see what I did there Harry lol, so the sooner we all get on board and accept it the better, as the Daleks said “resistance is useless”.

     

    #141180 Reply
    Wigwam
    Participant

    Brydo, it’s true of course that the direction has been determined and there’s nothing we can do about it – such is the power of the technocracy – but there’s no good reason to jump on board as you put it until EVs provide the user what ICE cars provide, and that’s not here yet.

    My ex-neighbour runs a 25 year old Peugeot Diesel Estate on used cooking oil, and says he will continue to do so until it dies.  He says he’s doing more for the planet than anyone buying a new car who will be feeding the industrial machine.

    #141181 Reply
    gothitjulie
    Participant

    A Nissan Leaf has a 600 pound saving a year vs a Note diesel over 10k miles. You would need to keep your electric car an awfully long time for you to say you actually saving money.

    You’re right of course, when I worked up the figures of my e-2008 against the fossil 2008, I’d save £2,100 on fuel cost vs electric cost (allowing 15p kWh although I usually charge cheaper), so the e-2008 had to be under £2,100 cheaper than the fossil & at the time the difference was £1,800.

    However, I’m doing way more miles in the EV than I did in my previous fossil because of that fuel price difference & don’t worry about popping down the coast for the afternoon (not during lockdown), or popping over to my sister’s for a chat & a meal (allowed during lockdown using a “bubble” but I haven’t).

    So, if an EV works out cheaper on Motability than the fossil, AND you’re not doing very long journeys all the time, AND you can charge at home, you might as well go for the EV. Long journeys are possible with an EV, you just have to plan for all the charging stops and it takes a while to learn which chargers & why (Instavolt with more than 1 charger at the site is most reliable, then any other multiple charger site except Ecotricty where they will all be out of service).

    As for the Leaf 40, most new rapid chargers at CCS so no use as the car uses CHAdeMO. (CCS has become the European standard for rapid chargers and CHAdeMO isn’t always supported by new rapid installations (Ionity are CCS only)).

     

     

    #141193 Reply
    Richard

    Wow an 18 minute 0-80%  recharge is a real killer vs petrol by the time you’ve queued for a pump, put on a glove or get a dirty hand, dispensed 50 litres of fuel, put a mask on, queue to get in the shop, queue at the till pay that can easily add up to a significant chunk of that 18 minutes anyway.

    Not to mention you drive to where you’re going, park, car charges no waiting at all. Plenty of parking spaces available to charge & park so it’s a non issue. Also the vast majority of car journeys are nowhere near the range of the battery so the only charging would take place at home anyway.

    This non stop sniping at charging “issues” by ill informed attitudes really needs to stop. Its not us versus them (I don’t have an EV BTW I drive a grand voyager) why do people feel the need to justify their position by denigrating the other option? We had it for decades with diesel vs petrol & now fossil fuels vs EV. Its completely irrational & pointless

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 34 total)
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