Electric, Petrol or Extend

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    Topic
  • #165993 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Well I had a test drive in a Kona electric today and it has left me unsure what route to take. The test drive, which I will not go into detail here, was okay. The car drives well but the interior left me a little underwhelmed with too much hard plastics and my back was starting to ache after an hour, although the equipment levels are really high and at 5.5m/kwh that equates to a real life range of 352miles based on town and country, and yes the car accelerates rapidly. Time to reflect. I am going to test drive an ID.3 and given that I know the interior is a little lacking, perhaps I can look at the car more objectively. Probably didn´t help the dealer being way too pushy coupled with a lack of knowledge about the car. I could not see the HUD unless the car seat was set low. The manager said this cannot be adjusted but I have since discovered it can.  This  lack of knowledge does not “sit well” with me. So the ID.3 next and then it will be time to decide on Electric, Petrol or an extension. Given the AP´s on Electric and Hybrid at the moment an extension is looking the most likely option in a wait and see exercise, to see what 2022 might bring.

Viewing 21 replies - 26 through 46 (of 46 total)
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    Replies
  • #166333 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    Should mention that i say that as someone who currently can’t make his mind up between the ID3 (smart) and the GTE (fun).

    #166335 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    I hope to have a similar quandary between the Kona and ID.3. Two good options are better than one.

    #166337 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    It’s always good to have a fall-back-plan. Hence us driving the GTE even though the ID3 objectively ticks all our boxes. If either gets removed, we still have a backup.

    Certainly hope that neither gets removed though – i’ll talk to our guy at VW on monday again, see if we can get the GTE for 2 hours and drive it all the way home and back (100 miles ish). Then we can compare the consumption against our 1.5 DSG Ateca (45mpg on that journey), the ID3 (2.2ish miles/kw in worst case scenario), curious to see how that works out for us.

    If we get over 70-80mpg on that journey in the GTE assuming we’re allowed to do so, it’s probably gonna be the GTE.

    #166408 Reply
    struth
    Participant

    just filled up and i did 56mpg from about 130miles, so not too bad. hybrid does assist a bit

    #166435 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Just been out and walked past a Ferrari showroom. Was going to pop in a take a test drive just in case!!!!

    #166524 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    ID.3 test drive complete and overall a nice car. I am edging towards the Kona as it has a slightly higher driving position, a better cabin, (IMO, especially as I prefer traditional buttons) together with a better  overall spec, lower AP and shorter build time. If the Kona was the only Option, I would buy it and the same with the ID.3. In fairness the ID.3 rides a little better than the Kona, and is a little bigger in terms of interior space and boot so I think another test drive in the Kona before a final decision, and a call to Motability to make sure there is nothing imminent in the electric sector.

    #166568 Reply
    Fastbike1000
    Participant

    I managed to find time this morning to visit my local VW dealer to have a look at the id3 and id4.

    First impressions are very good, I liked the style, I preferred the look of the id3 but the lack of boot space is a big problem for me, the id4 is a lot better but AP is  far too expensive for spec you get on motability.

    I’ve booked a test drive with the id3 just to double check if I can live with the lack of space.

    #166572 Reply
    BionicRusty
    Participant

    Yes and no. The PHEV Recharge, yes. The all-electric Recharge, no.

    True, I guess, Rene, but to be honest, in mid 2020 it was the plug in hybrid we were talking/asking about. I don’t think anyone would have queried about the full electric.

    I would have definitely held off if I’d know that the plug in hybrid was coming but it was a categorical ’No’ from every corner.

    The B4 engine that I ended up with is only slightly more economical than my old V6’s.
    The ‘Mild Hybrid’ is truly a commercial gaff. Not that I expected any different, mind, but I didn’t think it would be this thirsty.

    And your comment highlights another issue for me. The fact that Volvo are confusing the market now by calling different engines the same name. Not good from Volvo.

    Thank you for the info on range. That’s really interesting. Hopefully in two years, I’ll be following that route.

    🏎 I will be remembered for nothing but had great fun doing it 🏎

    #166574 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    Yes and no. The PHEV Recharge, yes. The all-electric Recharge, no.

    True, I guess, Rene, but to be honest, in mid 2020 it was the plug in hybrid we were talking/asking about. I don’t think anyone would have queried about the full electric. I would have definitely held off if I’d know that the plug in hybrid was coming but it was a categorical ’No’ from every corner. The B4 engine that I ended up with is only slightly more economical than my old V6’s. The ‘Mild Hybrid’ is truly a commercial gaff. Not that I expected any different, mind, but I didn’t think it would be this thirsty. And your comment highlights another issue for me. The fact that Volvo are confusing the market now by calling different engines the same name. Not good from Volvo. Thank you for the info on range. That’s really interesting. Hopefully in two years, I’ll be following that route.

    We were – but if you have a “less savvy” lad/lass on the phone who just quickly checks for the “recharge”, that would’ve been the result. The EV Recharge is somewhere over £50.000 if i recall correctly, so that’s where the vehement denial would come from i suppose.

    Mild hybrids are somewhat of a joke, i agree. It’s usually an AA battery somewhere in the circuit to be able to call it “hybrid”, but the real world benefit is negligible (and on top of that, very dependant on your route). It’s FHEV or PHEV that actually do have real world benefits, with PHEVs obviously offering the most.

    On Volvo: they’re actually not. You have a Volvo XC40 B4, on the scheme is the Volvo XC40 Recharge T5, and the one we won’t get is the Volvo XC40 Recharge P8. “Recharge” is their electrified range – and i agree it’s confusing (probably deliberately so, too), but they’re not calling different engines the same name.

    Our next car in march is probably going to be a PHEV (the Golf GTE), but we did test drive the ID3 too and were set on that until we drove the GTE. I think that’s our only problem with the ID3, the fact that we drove a Golf the week after – and there it became obvious that while the ID3 is a proper good car, you can tell that it’s a “first generation” car. Getting then into an 8th generation Golf, you could tell that the ID3 was missing some of the “poise” or “refinement” that comes with generational changes. Hard to explain what i mean, it’s just “feeling” better.

    That said: they still can shove these stupid touch sensitive buttons up theirs. Just plain awful.

    #166593 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Yes and no. The PHEV Recharge, yes. The all-electric Recharge, no.

    True, I guess, Rene, but to be honest, in mid 2020 it was the plug in hybrid we were talking/asking about. I don’t think anyone would have queried about the full electric. I would have definitely held off if I’d know that the plug in hybrid was coming but it was a categorical ’No’ from every corner. The B4 engine that I ended up with is only slightly more economical than my old V6’s. The ‘Mild Hybrid’ is truly a commercial gaff. Not that I expected any different, mind, but I didn’t think it would be this thirsty. And your comment highlights another issue for me. The fact that Volvo are confusing the market now by calling different engines the same name. Not good from Volvo. Thank you for the info on range. That’s really interesting. Hopefully in two years, I’ll be following that route.

    We were – but if you have a “less savvy” lad/lass on the phone who just quickly checks for the “recharge”, that would’ve been the result. The EV Recharge is somewhere over £50.000 if i recall correctly, so that’s where the vehement denial would come from i suppose. Mild hybrids are somewhat of a joke, i agree. It’s usually an AA battery somewhere in the circuit to be able to call it “hybrid”, but the real world benefit is negligible (and on top of that, very dependant on your route). It’s FHEV or PHEV that actually do have real world benefits, with PHEVs obviously offering the most. On Volvo: they’re actually not. You have a Volvo XC40 B4, on the scheme is the Volvo XC40 Recharge T5, and the one we won’t get is the Volvo XC40 Recharge P8. “Recharge” is their electrified range – and i agree it’s confusing (probably deliberately so, too), but they’re not calling different engines the same name. Our next car in march is probably going to be a PHEV (the Golf GTE), but we did test drive the ID3 too and were set on that until we drove the GTE. I think that’s our only problem with the ID3, the fact that we drove a Golf the week after – and there it became obvious that while the ID3 is a proper good car, you can tell that it’s a “first generation” car. Getting then into an 8th generation Golf, you could tell that the ID3 was missing some of the “poise” or “refinement” that comes with generational changes. Hard to explain what i mean, it’s just “feeling” better. That said: they still can shove these stupid touch sensitive buttons up theirs. Just plain awful.

    You cannot beat a good traditional button. I do wonder with some of the more radical cabin layouts, will they alienate a sector of the buying public? Then again we could end up with the equivalent of cream interiors to match our bland properties!

    Going to take another Kona out for a test drive this week and if nothing negative becomes of it will place an order when I am able. The car has some compromises which I am willing to live with.

    #166595 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    Yes and no. The PHEV Recharge, yes. The all-electric Recharge, no.

    True, I guess, Rene, but to be honest, in mid 2020 it was the plug in hybrid we were talking/asking about. I don’t think anyone would have queried about the full electric. I would have definitely held off if I’d know that the plug in hybrid was coming but it was a categorical ’No’ from every corner. The B4 engine that I ended up with is only slightly more economical than my old V6’s. The ‘Mild Hybrid’ is truly a commercial gaff. Not that I expected any different, mind, but I didn’t think it would be this thirsty. And your comment highlights another issue for me. The fact that Volvo are confusing the market now by calling different engines the same name. Not good from Volvo. Thank you for the info on range. That’s really interesting. Hopefully in two years, I’ll be following that route.

    We were – but if you have a “less savvy” lad/lass on the phone who just quickly checks for the “recharge”, that would’ve been the result. The EV Recharge is somewhere over £50.000 if i recall correctly, so that’s where the vehement denial would come from i suppose. Mild hybrids are somewhat of a joke, i agree. It’s usually an AA battery somewhere in the circuit to be able to call it “hybrid”, but the real world benefit is negligible (and on top of that, very dependant on your route). It’s FHEV or PHEV that actually do have real world benefits, with PHEVs obviously offering the most. On Volvo: they’re actually not. You have a Volvo XC40 B4, on the scheme is the Volvo XC40 Recharge T5, and the one we won’t get is the Volvo XC40 Recharge P8. “Recharge” is their electrified range – and i agree it’s confusing (probably deliberately so, too), but they’re not calling different engines the same name. Our next car in march is probably going to be a PHEV (the Golf GTE), but we did test drive the ID3 too and were set on that until we drove the GTE. I think that’s our only problem with the ID3, the fact that we drove a Golf the week after – and there it became obvious that while the ID3 is a proper good car, you can tell that it’s a “first generation” car. Getting then into an 8th generation Golf, you could tell that the ID3 was missing some of the “poise” or “refinement” that comes with generational changes. Hard to explain what i mean, it’s just “feeling” better. That said: they still can shove these stupid touch sensitive buttons up theirs. Just plain awful.

    You cannot beat a good traditional button. I do wonder with some of the more radical cabin layouts, will they alienate a sector of the buying public? Then again we could end up with the equivalent of cream interiors to match our bland properties! Going to take another Kona out for a test drive this week and if nothing negative becomes of it will place an order when I am able. The car has some compromises which I am willing to live with.

    I’m not against “radical” redesigns of interiors, i’m against unusable ones. Well.. It’s not unusable, but it’s inconvenient and nowhere near as easy to use as normal buttons. I can “feel” on my steering wheel which button i’m gonna press, not possible on the new steering wheels. At least for me.

    We talked to our VW guy today and got our extended test drive, just waiting for a call back now. We drove our Ateca at 45mpg over that route, if the Golf is able to best that convincingly, i think we’ve found our new car. They also offered us their in-stock GTE again, i just don’t know if i want a car without reversing camera, gotta make my mind up on that one. Choice would be “no reversing camera but instant delivery” (it is “our” colour and has the correct/upgraded wheels), or “reversing camera but close to 1 year delivery time”.

    Meh. 🙁

    #166597 Reply
    ldc7080

    Dont quote me on this but….   i believe that the grants being offered from OLEV are changing from the 1st April next year.  right now any home owner who has their own parking is eligible for the grant.  from 1st april it is removed and instead the grants will be going to people in the rental market instead as well as small businesses .  do not know what that means to Motability’s offer to pay for a home charger at your property?  maybe from Q2 2022 it will cost the customer £350?

    #166598 Reply
    ldc7080

    what is should have also said is maybe this is the time to go EV.  get the charger for free and from what i have seen the EVs are still in the same ball park as Q3 maybe thats something to think about?

     

    #166618 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Rene. I will not “copy and paste” your last post as by the time I have added my comments  it will be as long as a queue at a London petrol station!!! As long as the car had reversing sensors I think I could live without the camera. I have both on the Tuscon so understand the dilema.  The Golf is a very good option and I guess is quick too. Good luck with it.

    #166620 Reply
    Rene
    Participant

    Rene. I will not “copy and paste” your last post as by the time I have added my comments it will be as long as a queue at a London petrol station!!! As long as the car had reversing sensors I think I could live without the camera. I have both on the Tuscon so understand the dilema. The Golf is a very good option and I guess is quick too. Good luck with it.

    Yeah, kinda weird that the forum doesn’t automatically add spoilers to reduce the clutter.

    We’re a bit on the fence, i obviously have driven cars before without reversing camera, but after a few years now with 360 camera, i’m not sure i’d enjoy pulling out of parking spaces “the old way” again. We’ll see, on our extended test drive i’ll do some parking etc.

    And yep, the Golf is pretty rapid (when the battery is charged lol). Hope you’re going to enjoy the Kona, we still intend to test drive it but i can’t see us enjoying it more than the Golf.

    That said.. If the Tucson PHEV Ultimate comes down a little, maybe by £1000 (it’s £4999, sigh).. That could sway us.

    #166643 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    The new Tuscon is a huge improvement on the present one especially in terms of the interior.  Whilst the extra space would be nice, at £5k it’s a step too far and once the electric only range is exceeded consumption will be high.

    #166650 Reply
    jortegaa3289

    Nice post. I was checking constantly this blog and I’m impressed! Extremely useful info specially the last part I care for such information a lot. I was seeking this certain info for a long time

    #166666 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Nice post. I was checking constantly this blog and I’m impressed! Extremely useful info specially the last part I care for such information a lot. I was seeking this certain info for a long time

    Glad you found the info useful, which parts in particular were helpful?

    #166670 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    I meant to add that I think, or it certainly feels like, the Kona seats are a little higher than in the ID.3, and with a preference for a higher driving position, this suited me better.

    #166669 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Yes and no. The PHEV Recharge, yes. The all-electric Recharge, no.

    True, I guess, Rene, but to be honest, in mid 2020 it was the plug in hybrid we were talking/asking about. I don’t think anyone would have queried about the full electric. I would have definitely held off if I’d know that the plug in hybrid was coming but it was a categorical ’No’ from every corner. The B4 engine that I ended up with is only slightly more economical than my old V6’s. The ‘Mild Hybrid’ is truly a commercial gaff. Not that I expected any different, mind, but I didn’t think it would be this thirsty. And your comment highlights another issue for me. The fact that Volvo are confusing the market now by calling different engines the same name. Not good from Volvo. Thank you for the info on range. That’s really interesting. Hopefully in two years, I’ll be following that route.

    We were – but if you have a “less savvy” lad/lass on the phone who just quickly checks for the “recharge”, that would’ve been the result. The EV Recharge is somewhere over £50.000 if i recall correctly, so that’s where the vehement denial would come from i suppose. Mild hybrids are somewhat of a joke, i agree. It’s usually an AA battery somewhere in the circuit to be able to call it “hybrid”, but the real world benefit is negligible (and on top of that, very dependant on your route). It’s FHEV or PHEV that actually do have real world benefits, with PHEVs obviously offering the most. On Volvo: they’re actually not. You have a Volvo XC40 B4, on the scheme is the Volvo XC40 Recharge T5, and the one we won’t get is the Volvo XC40 Recharge P8. “Recharge” is their electrified range – and i agree it’s confusing (probably deliberately so, too), but they’re not calling different engines the same name. Our next car in march is probably going to be a PHEV (the Golf GTE), but we did test drive the ID3 too and were set on that until we drove the GTE. I think that’s our only problem with the ID3, the fact that we drove a Golf the week after – and there it became obvious that while the ID3 is a proper good car, you can tell that it’s a “first generation” car. Getting then into an 8th generation Golf, you could tell that the ID3 was missing some of the “poise” or “refinement” that comes with generational changes. Hard to explain what i mean, it’s just “feeling” better. That said: they still can shove these stupid touch sensitive buttons up theirs. Just plain awful.

    You cannot beat a good traditional button. I do wonder with some of the more radical cabin layouts, will they alienate a sector of the buying public? Then again we could end up with the equivalent of cream interiors to match our bland properties! Going to take another Kona out for a test drive this week and if nothing negative becomes of it will place an order when I am able. The car has some compromises which I am willing to live with.

    I’m not against “radical” redesigns of interiors, i’m against unusable ones. Well.. It’s not unusable, but it’s inconvenient and nowhere near as easy to use as normal buttons. I can “feel” on my steering wheel which button i’m gonna press, not possible on the new steering wheels. At least for me. We talked to our VW guy today and got our extended test drive, just waiting for a call back now. We drove our Ateca at 45mpg over that route, if the Golf is able to best that convincingly, i think we’ve found our new car. They also offered us their in-stock GTE again, i just don’t know if i want a car without reversing camera, gotta make my mind up on that one. Choice would be “no reversing camera but instant delivery” (it is “our” colour and has the correct/upgraded wheels), or “reversing camera but close to 1 year delivery time”. Meh. 🙁

    I meant to add that I think, or it certainly feels like, the Kona seats are a little higher than in the ID.3, and with a preference for a higher driving position, this suited me better.

    #166746 Reply
    fwippers
    Participant

    Have decided on the Kona following a 2nd test drive. I could not get past the minimalist interior of the ID.3.

Viewing 21 replies - 26 through 46 (of 46 total)
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