By the end of the year, 1,000,000 BEVs will be on our roads

  • This topic has 7 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated 8 months ago by Berzerker.
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  • #243825
    MFillingham
    Participant

      EVs set to break the million barrier

       

      October 23 saw 900k Battery Electric Vehicles on the British roads and forecasts expect that to reach the one million cars within the next 3 months, so by the end of December 2023.

       

      Did someone say sales are dropping?  Seems Ok to me.

       

      Mind you, if Facebook and LinkedIn posts are to be believed, we’re soon going to be at a 1 in 20 chance of being wiped out by a spontaneously combusting BEV.

      I'm Autistic, if I say something you find offensive, please let me know, I can guarantee it was unintentional.
      I'll try to give my honest opinion but am always open to learning.

      Mark

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    • #243856
      kezo
      Participant

        As I mentioned to Roger who recently covered this topic. There are over 35 million cars on our roads, with a million of them electric ?

        >68% of  EV are lease sales 🙂

        #243886
        Callmejohn
        Participant

          I just hope they are not all queuing up at the same charging points that I need. lol.

          #243889
          Glos Guy
          Participant

            As I mentioned to Roger who recently covered this topic. There are over 35 million cars on our roads, with a million of them electric ? >68% of EV are lease sales ?

            Exactly. EV numbers are bound to be increasing and, because they are coming from such a small base, percentage increases will always be massive and far greater than other car types. However, the far more relevant and telling statistic is what percentage of the total cars on our roads do they represent. As you say, 1m EVs out of 35m cars is nothing to shout about and when you drill down to private ownership it’s miniscule. That’s why a number of us were saying well before the PM announced the pushing back of the cut off dates that you only needed to have the most basic knowledge of maths to work out that the 2030/35 dates were never remotely achievable.

            #243890
            Berty

              New rules could make ICE engines unviable by 2026.

              EU rules with Euro 7 emissions legislation implemented by 2025. Quite a difficult read.  The link is below.

              This is NOT market forces, so forget about what the customer wants or gets.  But most vehilces are leased

              and you will not find a leasing company that will let you buy an ICE vehicle after 2026.

              Simply put, the EU wishes to force everyone on to EV’s as soon as.

              https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/business-tech%2C-development-and-manufacturing/analysis-new-rules-could-make-ice-engines

              #243902
              kezo
              Participant

                New rules could make ICE engines unviable by 2026. EU rules with Euro 7 emissions legislation implemented by 2025. Quite a difficult read. The link is below. This is NOT market forces, so forget about what the customer wants or gets. But most vehilces are leased and you will not find a leasing company that will let you buy an ICE vehicle after 2026. Simply put, the EU wishes to force everyone on to EV’s as soon as. https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/business-tech%2C-development-and-manufacturing/analysis-new-rules-could-make-ice-engines

                Way out of date. It even mentions the 2030 date set by UK.

                Euro 7 has been passed as of last week by EU parliment 329 in favour 230 against and41 countries abstained (Think of the EU’s powerhouse) . The next step is to talk to EU governments. However, as with any new Euro introduction, It will only apply to new vehicle models sold from that date onwards whils’t  existing models have had a few years to meet the new standards and won’t apply to used models, so not every vehicle has to be retrospective.

                Interestingly Euro7 will also include BEV’s added weigt and aimed at microplatics from tyres and particles from brakes for all cars, along with “possibly” exhaust emissions and include requirements concerning batteries.

                Next steps – Parliament is now ready to start talks with EU governments on the final form of the law.

                It is expected to add around £150 to the cost of passenger cars. (no concrete evdence on value yet)

                Edit: New post

                 

                • This reply was modified 8 months ago by kezo.
                • This reply was modified 8 months ago by kezo.
                #243905
                kezo
                Participant

                  Auto News Eurpe (March 23)

                  Transport ministers from Germany, Italy, the Czech Republic, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Hungary and Slovakia on Monday discussed their push to change proposed European Union Euro 7 emissions limits.

                  The Euro 7 law, which EU countries and lawmakers will start negotiating this year, would tighten limits on health-harming pollutants, including nitrogen oxides. The EU has said the health benefits would far outweigh the costs.

                  But countries, including the Czech Republic, oppose the proposed rules which they say are burdensome for industry. Most have big car-making sectors.

                  An EU official said the ministers had discussed the law’s “unrealistic” deadlines and issues with equipment to enforce it.

                  “Our effort is, in the area of Euro 7, to make those conditions really realistic, to make them achievable,” Czech Transport Minister Martin Kupka said following the meeting in Strasbourg, which he convened.

                  The Czech Republic said the countries had reservations on the short period for adoption of Euro 7, which under proposals should come into force in mid-2025 for cars.

                  It has proposed a four-year period for the regulation to take effect, along with some technical changes, to give industry time to prepare and boost technological measures.

                   

                  EU Council adopts watered-down Euro 7 position  (October 23)

                  EU countries officially agreed their position on draft vehicle pollution standards, known as Euro 7, on Monday (25 September), significantly toning down the Commission’s original proposal in an apparent bid to ensure Europe’s automotive competitiveness.

                  The Spanish presidency, which was tasked with finding a compromise that the majority of member states could support, hailed the agreement as providing “realistic emissions levels for the vehicles of the next decade while helping our industry make the definitive leap towards clean cars in 2035”.

                  Throughout the debate, countries opposed to stricter measures opined that forcing car companies to retool combustion engines to meet stricter standards would draw funds away from the necessary transition to electric vehicles, while pushing up the cost of new petrol and diesel cars for consumers.

                  Martin Kupka, the transport minister of Czechia, a country in which over half a million people are employed in jobs related to the automotive sector, welcomed the Council text, arguing that the Commission’s original proposal was “unrealistic and simply not feasible for us to implement”.

                  Kupka argued that were the EU to agree to overly strong measures, it could “put the [European] automotive sector in jeopardy on the global scale”.

                  France similarly supported the text, saying that it was necessary to “strike a balance between health and competitiveness, affordability and the ability of citizens to move about”.

                  Those who rejected the Council text put an emphasis on the health impact of vehicle pollution, such as PM10, PM2.5, and NOx, citing the impact of poor air quality on urban communities.

                  Denmark called the compromise text “a wasted opportunity” to preserve the health of Europeans, adding that it was a mistake for Europe to abdicate its position in setting global standards.

                  “Let us remember that our choices today shape the future of our industry and our environment. Having said that, I will abstain,” said the Netherlands representative.

                  In a critical intervention, Irish minister Dara Calleary described the proposal as “a variant of Euro 6, rather than a brand new Euro 7”.

                  Euro 6 plus
                  Under the Council’s position, the pollution limits for cars and vans would remain essentially the same as under Euro 6, the standards currently in place. Limits for heavy-duty vehicles will be lowered and test conditions slightly adjusted.

                  However, the Council unanimously backed limits for emissions from brakes and tyres, the first instance of such rules, as well as new standards on of electric vehicle batteries.

                  As Europe transitions primarily to electric passenger cars, microparticles stemming from the friction of brake pads and tyres will continue to be released.

                  Speaking at the outset of the Council discussion Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton told delegates that the Council’s compromise position is “welcome” by the Commission, despite the deviations from the original proposal.

                  The Commissioner, who is an open critic of the decision to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2035, said that Europe’s automotive sector must work to counter competition from the United States and China.

                  He cited three key objectives for member states to keep in mind when deciding their position on Euro 7: improving air quality, preserving competitiveness, and putting clean cars on the road at affordable prices.

                  Objections.

                  Germany’s only Green member, NGO Transport & Environment (T&E), which has long pushed for a stronger Euro 7 on health grounds, was – as could be expected – disheartened by the Council’s position, calling it “a disaster for air quality” that puts “carmakers’ record profits ahead of people’s health”.

                  “Instead of reducing pollution it will greenwash today’s polluting Euro 6 cars as ‘clean’ Euro 7 vehicles,” said Anna Krajinska, vehicle emissions and air quality manager at T&E.

                  While carmakers have called for Euro 7 to be revised, those involved in the automotive supply chain have typically asked for stronger regulation.

                  In a statement, Benjamin Krieger, the secretary general of CLEPA, a trade association representing auto part makers, questioned the justification for watering down the Commission’s proposal.

                  “Regressing to Euro 6 is not needed to maintain affordable mobility and will neither support implementing stricter air quality limits nor stimulate innovation in the EU,” he said.

                  #243908
                  Berzerker

                    …love to see what all these bods who are making these rules drive…?

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